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Minxminnie

Where The World Ends

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In the windswept Outer Hebrides, islanders have always relied on seabirds as a source of food, and there has been the tradition of the guga hunt: men and boys spend a couple of weeks on a remote sea stack, killing and gathering fulmars and other birds for fuel, food and other purposes. One of Peter May's Lewis trilogy is based on the guga hunt, and there is a recent NF book about the tradition, by, I think, Donald Murray. It persists in the Western Isles and is part initiation rite into manhood.

Geraldine McCaughrean's Carnegie medal winning novel is an imagined version of a St Kilda guga hunt from 1727 when the boat didn't return for the hunting party, and they were stranded on the rock. It's very compelling. Obviously we see different personalities emerge as they face the fact that they're not going to be rescued soon. It is done so well. I barely noticed that I was reading a book aimed at children. It brings the environment to life very vividly, and the interaction of the characters is unsentimental and real. I won't say any more about how it develops so as not to spoil it, but it is well worth a read, and I think it's only a couple of pounds on UK Kindle just now.

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1 hour ago, Minxminnie said:

In the windswept Outer Hebrides, islanders have always relied on seabirds as a source of food, and there has been the tradition of the guga hunt: men and boys spend a couple of weeks on a remote sea stack, killing and gathering fulmars and other birds for fuel, food and other purposes. One of Peter May's Lewis trilogy is based on the guga hunt, and there is a recent NF book about the tradition, by, I think, Donald Murray. It persists in the Western Isles and is part initiation rite into manhood.

Geraldine McCaughrean's Carnegie medal winning novel is an imagined version of a St Kilda guga hunt from 1727 when the boat didn't return for the hunting party, and they were stranded on the rock. It's very compelling. Obviously we see different personalities emerge as they face the fact that they're not going to be rescued soon. It is done so well. I barely noticed that I was reading a book aimed at children. It brings the environment to life very vividly, and the interaction of the characters is unsentimental and real. I won't say any more about how it develops so as not to spoil it, but it is well worth a read, and I think it's only a couple of pounds on UK Kindle just now.

Looks like a good one MM - I read about the guga hunt in one of Peter May's books, different time period though but a good read nevertheless.

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