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The Gender Games

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Review of The Gender Games: The Problem with Men and Women from Someone who has been both by Juno Dawson.

 

It is very simple how this book had came onto my radar, I was looking for a dvd of a movie Juno at home but couldn't find it (I think someone borrowed it) so obviously as this is one of my favourite movies of all time (I have a thing for quirky comedies). So when ordering a new one on amazon, the second result was this book, intrigued by it. I did some due diligence on it and decided, "why not?", I needed to get the order up to £25 anyway.

 

Part biography and part social commentary, I really enjoyed reading Juno Dawson's book. I found it to be extremely funny at times but also she makes really good arguments and points on subjects. There are a fair amount of pop culture references and it goes from her early life to when she was writing this book, most of which I can relate to or get (for example, many mentions of Neighbours on the pages). She puts forward excellent arguments against those that try to deny transgender individuals and the passages in the book about her own life were really good and interesting. I found myself just really enjoying her writing style as it was a pleasure to read her point of views.

 

Maybe if the person that borrowed my Juno dvd ever returns it, I could thank them twice, one for returning the dvd and two for the happy accident that I had stumbled on this terrific book, brimming with humour but also very heart felt, she has such a compelling voice and this was a terrific red that I would never have heard of probably if it wasn't for whoever borrowed my Juno dvd.

 

Superb, enjoyable read but also one I agreed a lot with and thought overall this was a fantastic book.

 

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