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lunababymoonchild

How Reading Changes Your Brain

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Interesting article, right now I could use a book where the character is enjoying being in a hot sunny country so that maybe I could 'get into the character' -.I'm really cold! :scratchhe

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4 minutes ago, momac said:

Interesting article, right now I could use a book where the character is enjoying being in a hot sunny country so that maybe I could 'get into the character' -.I'm really cold! :scratchhe

 

We are cold too, Momac but probably not as cold as you

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I can probably get some cold prizes...  Our heating broke down two weeks ago (green technology is wonderful when it works but the fundamental problem with heat pumps is that they stop operating efficiently when the temperature goes below 2°, which it does a lot in Europe, and frequently seizes up when it goes below freezing, which it also does a lot!) We're currently waiting for a spare part, 10 more days, and I though the kitchen felt really nice when I got up because it was all of 15° (two days ago it was 13).

 

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Well...

I've read a lot. Not much quality, quite a quantity.

But I'm not convinced I'm a better person... and I know I'm not a more positive person.

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I think that reading helps your imagination, helps the way you express yourself, you learn new words and also they might improve your writing as well. However, I am wondering what are the positives from listening to audiobooks, what do you think?

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Maybe a bit better weather today Luna, temp to go up above zero.

 

Poison I, have never listened to an audiobook but I agree that books do help with your imagination. It would be an added help if you are listening to someone with a really expressive voice I would think. :hmm:

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Yeah, I agree. However, I am not sure whether it is as helpful as the actual reading. I mean, it kind of steals the magic from the whole process. It might be easier for people who enjoy listening to audiobooks while doing other activities, but I don't know. I guess I have to try it for myself and see.

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4 hours ago, poison_ivy said:

Yeah, I agree. However, I am not sure whether it is as helpful as the actual reading. I mean, it kind of steals the magic from the whole process. It might be easier for people who enjoy listening to audiobooks while doing other activities, but I don't know. I guess I have to try it for myself and see.

 

If you are paritally sighted/blind then you have no option.  I still think that you can imagine what's happening if someone is reading to you.  I had no problem with that as a child when being read to.

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I didn't mean that! Of course, if you have some kind of disability you don't have a choice, and yeah, the imagination is still working, even better than before.  I was talking about my personal experience as a person who prefers to read rather be read to. My imagination works better that way. I can't talk from anyone else's view since I am not in their shoes, everyone has a different approach and I totally support that!

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I'm thinking that the books would have to be quite challenging to offer these benefits; so Jane Austen seemed to be a great choice for this study. I do, however, question if many of the books written these days would have such an effect—many being written to accommodate the lazy reader who prefers short sentences, primary vocab, and little detail, so they might read it faster and not have to do a little research of their own and learn something.

 

Books like:

 

Moby Dick

Decline and Fall of the Roman Empire (Best book ever! I shall bite anyone who disagrees!)

Anything written by Winston Churchill

 

... would likely elicit such benefits if they do in fact exist, do to their extensive vocab, deep and complicated sentence structure, and insight.

 

Also, I believe this might have a lot to do with how we choose to process that information we've read—especially the things that we don't understand. Many people skip looking up words they don't know, so they can continue reading at a fast pace and get to the end; or they just assume such is such without verifying. Focusing on grammar of a book can help to get one deeper within it as well.

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