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This book was on the bookshelf at my daughter's boyfriend's parents' house in Houston where we had Christmas.  My tablet was being uncooperative on charging, so I had to raid their bookshelves.  I started in the bookshelf in the room where I was staying and after finding a lot of things not to my liking, I happened on this book.  It was one of the best books I read this year.

 

It focuses tightly on the years 1925-1927, when the whole idea of an approach to quantum physics was begun and refined.  it's very clear how much the scientists at the time were groping in the dark (and apparently, still are, with lots of quotes from current scientists about spending their whole careers working in an area that doesn't make any sense).  Einstein figures, but this wasn't his top area of interest, so there are lots of other scientists (about 10, not surprisingly) who are profiled, with details about the differences among them as people and as scientists.  I loved it and couldn't wait to get back to reading it.

 

I came downstairs at one point and asked if anyone wanted to hear the funniest line from the book I was reading on quantum physics.  After my daughter announced that that was undoubtedly a very low bar, I was allowed to read the following quote about the writing style of Neils Bohr:

 

"Bohr seemed to fear oversimplification more than anything else, and exerted all his efforts to avoid giving the illusion of clarity."

 

Ha!  Apparently that's how he spoke, too.  

 

If you are at all interested in science--not just quantum physics--I highly recommend this book.

 

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Yes, Luna.  You can tell it has been a while since I posted a review.  I have fixed it, but couldn't find the button that said to list the first one as the author.  Will see if I can figure it out.

 

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This does seem like a fascinating book. Unfortunately it doesn't seem to be available to borrow from any library in the U.S. I may just have to buy it. 

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I had no idea I was reading a  hard-to-find book.  I hope you get your hands on it somehow and enjoy it.

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Apparently I missed some of the additional editions of this. Received a copy yesterday through interlibrary loan. Will be starting this today. Looking forward to to it!

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I'm glad both of you were able to get your hands on it.  I hope you like it as much as I did.

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This was a good book, for what it was. There were some interesting parts about the development of Quantum physics, and some fun details about the people involved; Who knew Einstein was a horndog😂😏 But I wish it would've been more about ideas and less about personalities, especially since the author didn't delve deeply into those personalities. As non-fiction I wish this had been written by Sarah Bakewell instead of Sheilla Jones. 

But that is the reason why I don't read non-fiction very much. I really wanted someone who understood the people and the concepts so well that they could write dialogue between Einstein and Bohr, for example. I wanted interactions that felt true, even though they were imagined. I wanted depth that is simply not possible at this remove without moving away from dry 'facts' and into speculation and imagination. 
But I am glad I read it and I thank you for the recommendation, Binker!

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I thoroughly enjoyed this book.  It was detailed and a lot to take in and I was surprised by two things.  One was that even super intelligent people like the quantum ten sometimes have trouble understanding each other's work and that super intelligent people like the quantum ten could have self-doubt.

 

A great read and well worth the effort, I'm glad that made that effort.

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