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Getting permission to re-publish out of print books


biblionaut
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Hi, I'm interested in learning how to obtain permission to re-publish out of print books.   Don't know the first thing about it.

In particular I'm looking for how to contact Parker Publishing Company Inc, which formerly had addresses in Englewood Cliffs NJ (1970's) and West Nyack, NY.

Any guidance on this would be appreciated. 

Thanks!

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Can't offer any advice.  Except this, which took me 5 minutes via Google.

Although you can't contact the publisher via their website http://www.parker-publishing.com/home/ it does list their aquisitions editor Kymberlyn Reed who has a twitter https://twitter.com/FountainPenDiva and LikedIn https://www.linkedin.com/in/kymberlyn-reed-18718010 presence.

Whith a bit of digging you could probably find the details for the comany directors.

 

If that's not the right Parker Publishing; quite a few other entries came up including a fan club.

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Thanks for the input.   Parker Publishing LLC is a newer company, unrelated. 

 

I googled around quite a bit for the "Parker Publishing Company Inc." as shown in the front matter of the books I'm thinking about for and so far it's all historical at best.  I suspect they dissolved or were acquired, and it's going to take some deeper dives... 

Edited by biblionaut
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I saw something that said Parker operated from the 60s to the 80s. In your searches, did you come across anything about Parker being bought by Prentice Hall? Prentice Hall was later sold to Simon & Schuster, and it now seems that parts of it may be with Pearson. 

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It may be just a wild goose chase. I did notice that some of Parker's books and authors were being published by Prentice now. Scott Witt was the author that I zoned in on. Also, Prentice publishes a few books with the titles of Parker Publishing Editorial Staff...yada, yada, yada. The two, combined together, make me think there may have been a wholesale purchase of Parker by Prentice. 

 

The real leg work begins to see if Prentice Hall and Simon & Schuster have the copyrights or if Pearson does. 

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Thanks for the suggestion.  Yes, it's an interesting challenge, too.  The Simon & Schuster web sites don't seem to offer email addresses for contact, and the telephone options are all about ordering books.  Probably have to try a bookstore affiliate first.  And based on the amount of effort time this looks like it will take, I'm going to have to put this on slow march for now.  There is some really good information in out-of-print books, which I would hate to see get lost, but, priorities, prlorities...plus they've been out of print for 40 years, so few more probably won't make much difference.

Edited by biblionaut
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Well...the books I'm interested in are by Frank Rudolph Young.  I actually was in contact with Young back in about 1987, and he said, no, the copyrights belonged to the publisher.  My interest, which I would call "hobby", didn't take me any further in pursuit at that time.    Young would be about 106 now, and I wouldn't put it past him to still be alive.  However, he hasn't left much of a trail as to how to locate him or his heirs.  His books contain wonderful material, some of it definitely bordering on (or fully crossing into) the very strange.  And most of his books were written in the 1960's-70's when he as in his late fifties-early sixties, and written primarily for people in their 40's and 50's.  So not at all a contemporary style.  Still, wonderful, actionable material, full of insights, highly prescriptive, and at least some parts very effective.  I would like to see it preserved.   Some of it is on Scribd, some in Google books.   So there's hope.

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Obviously I'm much more familiar with UK publishing law than the US but basically unless you sell the copyright of your work to someone (which rarely happens these days) a publisher only buys the right to use the work for a certain amount of time. This usually means while the publisher continues to keep the book in print - once it has gone out of print the rights revert back to the original author. Would your author really have sold the copyright? He probably just eant the rights?

 

In the UK copyright of any work remains the property of an author's heirs for 70 years after ther death - thus my brother and I have the rights to any royalties from the 30 or so biographies that my grandfather wrote as he died in 1970 (not that in practice we get anything!). I know the law in some parts of the US is different and that books go out of copyright a certain time after they were published.

 

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