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tagesmann

The Noise of Time

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In May 1937 a man in his early thirties waits by the lift of a Leningrad apartment block. He waits all through the night, expecting to be taken away to the Big House. Any celebrity he has known in the previous decade is no use to him now. And few who are taken to the Big House ever return.

So, you are so worried that the KGB will come calling one night that you can't sleep. And because you can't sleep, neither can your wife.  So you pack a small suitcase with a change of underwear, pyjamas and some cigarettes.  Then you stand on the landing, by the lift, waiting... And thinking.

 

An involving account of what it might have been like for an artist to live under Soviet rule. Was Shostakovich a coward as he thought? Or just a survivor?

 

Whatever; this is an involving book.  Highly recommended.

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