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I actually joined the forum in December but, despite good intentions, this is my first post !

I enjoy reading just about anything - will sit and read the cereal packet at breakfast if there are no other options !

Of late I've been enjoying lots of music related stuff (Chronicles by Bob Dylan, Complicated Shadows about Elvis Costello, Isis and Telegraph anthologies about Dylan with Christy Moore's book lined up on the shelf and awaiting the new book about Van Morrison with interest).

I tend towards more non fiction - a favourite is to drop into a bookshop and browse a section for something I know nothing about and then go away and find out about it. Found out about all sorts of historical events, places, science, religion as a result. My dream present is a large value book token so I can go and indulge in semi random book buying !!

I look forward to picking up good tips on new areas to explore.....

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hello everyone

 

I found this forum after searching through Yahoo & thought I should introduce myself to all you good people. I'm female (seemings as you can't tell by my username) & I am mainly into non-fiction books, though I'm also currently going through a bit of a thriller phase.

 

I'm not really sure what else to say, so if there's anything else you want to know just ask.

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Hello!

 

I'm a journalist, I live in London, and I got into the site because I play cricket with Bill.

 

My literary tastes are somewhat acquired:

 

William Cobbett, Christopher Logue, P.J. O'Rourke, Martin Amis, Dickens, Evelyn Waugh, Wodehouse, Nabokov.

 

Spot the connection, if you can. I can't.

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Hi I'm sunny,

 

Bookworm reading everything from fantasy to biography, crime to paleo-anthropology, westerns to reference books. Fave authors incude Terry Pratchett, Jeffrey Deaver, and Jim Butcher (posted about him in the fantasy section).

 

My husband keeps threatening to have a bonfire of my books if I buy any more. But he has recently started to read a bit himself so there's hope for him yet.

 

Living in Wales, but travelled a bit, both online and off.

 

Niced to be here,

 

~ sunny

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Hi, I'm Mungus, just joined up.

 

I read a lot but fairly indiscriminately. I am guilty of being seduced by the 'three for two' offers in you-know-where and I would like to get more personal recommendations to broaden my horizons.

 

I buy quite a lot of 'popular science' books, but don't finish many of them because my attention drifts. If anyone else has a similar habit, perhaps we could help each other.

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Hi everyone

 

I'm Zafar from Yorkshire, I found the website following links on http://www.bookgroup.info

 

I'm pleased I did.

 

I think its great sharing good books with others and learning what others are reading.

 

I think three on my best would be

3) Emile Zola 'Germinal'

2) Thomas Mann 'Buddenbrooks'

1) Richard Wright 'Native Son'

 

Currently I'm reading Miriam Toews's 'a complicated kindness' I haven't read anything as original and intelligent as this for a long time. It's a story of family life in a Canadian mennonite community.

 

If anybody would like to recommend a book please let me know.

 

Cheers

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Hello there! Just registered today after trying to find a decent web site for book lovers for some time! I am currently reading Jude The Obscure by Thomas Hardy, one of my all time favourite books, in between trying to work my way down the BBC's Top 100 reads! I will read almost anything (although I draw the line at Mills and Boons!) and I'm looking forward to getting recommendations from all you lovely book worms out there! :)

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I think three on my best would be

3) Emile Zola 'Germinal'

2) Thomas Mann 'Buddenbrooks'

1) Richard Wright 'Native Son'

 

 

I have never encountered anyone else who has read Mann's 'Buddenbrooks', let alone put it as one of their favourites. I agree, Three Mangos - it's also one of my favourites (and I would also place the Zola and Wright high on that list too, though I think I prefer Ellison's 'Invisible Man' to Wright's 'Native Son' - what do you think of the Ellison?)

 

Have you thought about starting a discussion thread under International on Buddenbrooks? I would certainly join in! :)

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Ade

 

I agree Ellision's 'Invisable Man' is a great book.

 

You know an interesting thing, it was It was Richard Wright who encouraged Ellison to write as he originally trained as a musician. Wright provided him with regular feedback and criticism. When 'Invisable Man' was published Wright said to Ellison "Welcome grand man of letters". Ellison paid compliment to Wright after is death- tragically in exile in France- in his essay 'Remembering Richard Wright'.

 

Richard Wright was unique in the sense that he was entirely self taught, never had a full year education. It is astonishing that he would eventually become friends with such greats as de Beauvoir, Satre and Camus.

 

I'm delighted you enjoyed 'Buddenbrooks' it had a profound effect on me. When little Hano Buddenbrook dies in the end and is visited by his little friend, it was heart breaking. I thought its books like this that remind me why I bother reading in the first place and more importantly whats at stake if great fiction stops.

 

If you haven't read Halldor Laxness independent People, you might enjoy it!

 

please feel free to suggest something.

 

Cheers

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Thanks for all the interesting info on Richard Wright - I didn't know this. And I agree that Hanno's death in 'Buddenbrooks' is incredibly moving - in fact, all the episodes where he appears and the description of his short, unhappy life, so at odds with the business world around him. (It always reminds me of Paul Dombey in 'Dombey and Son' by Dickens - there are lots of parallels between the two books.) I also find the death of Thomas Buddenbrooks moving too - the way he dies in such an undignified way in the public street and the fact that Mann describes it using such cold, dispassionate language. I do think you should start a new thread for this.

 

Thanks for the recommendation on Halldor Laxness - I've ordered this from Amazon and the reviews there make me even more anxious to read it. It will take me some time to do so, but I'll post some comments as soon as I have under the thread you've started.

 

Have you tried Zadie Smith's 'White Teeth'? I've started a thread on this under 21st century fiction and I'd be interested in your thoughts on this book.

 

Welcome to the forum! :)

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We are welcoming a lot of new members at the moment, so if you have just joined, why not introduce yourself here? Tell us a little bit about yourself, what you like reading, and if you have any questions about the site, ask away.

 

I'm sure our existing members will want to wish you all a warm welcome, and will be happy to answer any queries. Yes, it is a large site, with lots of forums, but it doesn't take long to find your way around. And it means there's a lot there to get your teeth into.

 

 

Hi my name is Hazel and I am a full-time mum of 2 boys and am currently half way through a BA (Hons) English Language and Literature. I love reading, guess we all do or we wouldn't be here, and I also love music and films. I heard about this site from either The Guardian or The Observer this weekend and thought i would procrastinate further about studying and fill up even more of my spare time by joining in! Even though I am a prolific reader, I recently realized that I had no decent structure to my reading so have embarked on a alternating contemporary then classics rota. So, currently reading Little Women and enjoying it. Look forward to meeting you all and reading some good books and hopefully having good discussions.

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Hi, I’m Angel, married to Angle, also a new member. I read about BGO following links from ‘English Teaching Online’ (http://www.teachit.co.uk), an article called ‘Bookish Websites worth a look’, by Rhiannon Glover.

 

When I read, I like to savour every word at spoken pace and I flick to and fro to confirm hints and links, but time is prohibitive and all too often I have to speed. My reading time is split three ways: curriculum study and preparation, working my way through school library books so that I can recommend appropriately and, most importantly, personal indulgence. Fortunately the boundaries often blend unexpectedly, bringing their own delights.

 

I teach 11 to 18 year olds in a Mental Hospital, (from foundation level to A Level) and my biggest problem at the moment is finding exciting books for streetwise 16 to 18 year old boys, that do not include inappropriate, over-stimulating bad language and violence. Suggestions welcome.

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Is that with the OU? How's it going?

 

Hi Claire

 

It's going just fine, the OU really suits me and I can tailor my studying around my children (4 year old and 7 month old). It's a good way to keep my brain from turning to mush, and when I started it I never thought I would get to halfway through year 3 and still be enjoying it and have the same enthusiasm. I am a little proud of myself, having left school with a few mediocre qualifications under my belt, got a boring office job and now I am getting good marks for my essays that I never knew I had in me!

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I teach 11 to 18 year olds in a Mental Hospital, (from foundation level to A Level) and my biggest problem at the moment is finding exciting books for streetwise 16 to 18 year old boys, that do not include inappropriate, over-stimulating bad language and violence. Suggestions welcome.

 

 

I don't know if this will help, but my sister is a psychiatrist and worked with teenage boys with learning difficulties and she found alot of Augusten Burroughs' work and Melvin Burgess's Doing It held their attentions, though have a little explicit in places. I remember Doing It got some really bad press when it came out, but I liked it and found it amusing and pretty realistic in terms of streetwise teenage boys. And from memory of being in school, boys seemed to enjoy Catcher in the Rye and Of Mice and Men. Hope this helps.

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Hi Hazel,

Thank you for your helpful suggestions.

 

I’ve not come across Augusten Burroughs, but have looked him up now up am ordering my copies. The crits sound intriguing.

 

I do know much of Melvin Burgess’ work and how popular he is, particularly with brighter kids even though the reading level is not difficult. I remember reading about ‘Doing it’ and thinking it could be appropriate for some boys, but I had forgotten about it. Thanks for reminding me. ‘Junk’ was quite controversial but in the end had a moral theme and it sounds as if ‘Doing it’ is the same.

 

‘Catcher in the Rye’ and ‘Of Mice and Men’ are still as popular as ever, but you made me realise how often I think of them as GCSE texts and forget to recommend them to other pupils.

 

Thanks again Hazel.

 

 

PS - To the admininistrators. Thanks for your work; I am enjoying the site very much - mainly browsing so far. I am aware that I probably asked for suggestions in the wrong forum. Is there a more appropriate one?

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Hi Hazel,

Thank you for your helpful suggestions.

 

I’ve not come across Augusten Burroughs, but have looked him up now up am ordering my copies. The crits sound intriguing.

 

I do know much of Melvin Burgess’ work and how popular he is, particularly with brighter kids even though the reading level is not difficult. I remember reading about ‘Doing it’ and thinking it could be appropriate for some boys, but I had forgotten about it. Thanks for reminding me. ‘Junk’ was quite controversial but in the end had a moral theme and it sounds as if ‘Doing it’ is the same.

 

‘Catcher in the Rye’ and ‘Of Mice and Men’ are still as popular as ever, but you made me realise how often I think of them as GCSE texts and forget to recommend them to other pupils.

 

Thanks again Hazel.

 

 

PS - To the admininistrators. Thanks for your work; I am enjoying the site very much - mainly browsing so far. I am aware that I probably asked for suggestions in the wrong forum. Is there a more appropriate one?

 

No problem - another author, Chuck Palahnuik, comes to mind, boys/men seem to enjoy them alot but I don't know how moralistic his books are, but I do know that they can be fairly explicit.

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