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Never read the comic, but I saw the first episode. Not really sure what all was happening, but it was highly entertaining!

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Just saw episode 2 and the only problem I had was that there wasn't enough Cassidy! That character is funny!

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As a huge fan of the comics I was pretty sure that the tv show was not going to live up to my love for them but I think the makers have done a fantastic job in taking the spirit of the comics and making them watchable. There are many elements of the comics that are frankly unfilmable and the approach Seth Rogen et al have taken will allow them a little artistic licence with the troublesome areas.

 

I agree, Cassidy is fantastic. In the comics, he and Preacher knew each other before Jesse got the word of God - they were in a little criminal crew with Tulip - but I like the approach the show has taken.

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I loved it, I think the makers did a great job bringing it to the screen and Seth Rogen did it proud. All the casting was excellent, I think I prefer TV Tulip to book Tulip.

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I get the feeling that Season 1 was back story and we will start the comics properly in season 2. Rogen and Apatow did say before the first season was aired that they were playing a long game and the show wouldn't really kick in along with the comics until the second season, and having watched the first season now I would agree with that. I liked TV Tulip better too. Tulip in the comics was always the weakest link and felt a little tokenistic but the TV one is pretty badass.

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