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I read the first book (The Emperor's Blades) a few months ago and I just could not put it down, I have to know what happened next and I was so disappointed when I realized that I would need to wait to read the next one, now while roming goodreads I see that the next one in the series, The Providence of Fire has been published and I am off to see if I can get my hands on a copy.

Has anyone else read the first one? Wasn't it great?

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Sounds like a good series, Rincewind, just read summary elsewhere.  Good to have you around again, tempting us with new fantasy.  Think Ting might like the thought of riding around on big hawks, as she is an Avatar devotee.

 

Yes please!!!! :yup:

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The summary for The Emperors Blades the first book in the series from goodreads,

 

"The circle is closing. The stakes are high. And old truths will live again . . .

 

The Emperor has been murdered, leaving the Annurian Empire in turmoil. Now his progeny must bury their grief and prepare to unmask a conspiracy.

 

His son Valyn, training for the empire’s deadliest fighting force, hears the news an ocean away. He expected a challenge, but after several ‘accidents’ and a dying soldier’s warning, he realizes his life is also in danger. Yet before Valyn can take action, he must survive the mercenaries’ brutal final initiation.

 

Meanwhile, the Emperor’s daughter, Minister Adare, hunts her father’s murderer in the capital itself. Court politics can be fatal, but she needs justice. And Kaden, heir to an empire, studies in a remote monastery. Here, the Blank God’s disciples teach their harsh ways – which Kaden must master to unlock their ancient powers. When an imperial delegation arrives, he’s learnt enough to perceive evil intent. But will this keep him alive, as long-hidden powers make their move?"

 

And the link to the book :-)

 

https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/17910124.The_Emperor_s_Blades

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