Jump to content
Sign in to follow this  
tagesmann

Vote for the 3rd BGO Book Group Read of 2014

  

13 members have voted

  1. 1. Please vote

    • Me Talk Pretty One Day - David Sedaris
      3
    • Dave Barry's Greatest Hits
      1
    • something by PG Wodehouse
      0
    • The Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy - Douglas Adams
      2
    • Corridors of Death - Ruth Dudley Edwards
      2
    • Things Snowball - Rich Hall
      3
    • something by Jasper Fforde
      2
    • Fluke - Christopher Moore
      0


Recommended Posts

The nominations are:

 

Me Talk Pretty One Day by David Sedaris

David Sedaris became a star autobiographer on public radio, onstage in New York, and on bestseller lists, mostly on the strength of Santaland Diaries a scathing, hilarious account of his stint as a Christmas elf at Macy's department store. Sedaris's caustic gift has not deserted him in his fourth book, which mines poignant comedy from his peculiar childhood in North Carolina, his bizarre career path and his move with his lover to France.

Though his anarchic inclination to digress is his glory, Sedaris does have a theme in these reminiscences: the inability of humans to communicate. The title is his rendition in transliterated English of how he and his fellow students of French in Paris mangle the Gallic language. In the essay "Jesus Shaves", he and his classmates from many nations try to convey the concept of Easter to a Moroccan Muslim. "It is a party for the little boy of God", says one. "Then he be die one day on two... morsels of... lumber", says another. Sedaris muses on the disputes between his Protestant mother and his father, a Greek Orthodox man whose Easter fell on a different day. Other essays explicate his deep kinship with his eccentric mother and absurd alienation from his IBM-exec dad: "To me, the greatest mystery of science continues to be that a man could father six children who shared absolutely none of his interests".

 

Dave Barry's Greatest Hits

A Greatest Hits package to die for, in which the inimitable, Pulitzer-packing humourist applies himself to taxes, toilets, airbags, baseball, beer commercials, and numerous other American artefacts. A typical bit, from a piece on legalized gambling: "Off-Track Betting parlours are the kinds of places where you never see signs that say, 'Thank You for Not Smoking.' The best you could hope for is, 'Thank You for Not Spitting Pieces of Your Cigar on My Neck.'" Happy? There's plenty more where that came from.

 

something by PG Wodehouse (would require further nominations and voting)

An English humourist whose body of work includes novels, short stories, plays, poems, song lyrics and numerous pieces of journalism. He enjoyed enormous popular success during a career that lasted more than seventy years, and his many writings continue to be widely read. Despite the political and social upheavals that occurred during his life, much of which was spent in France and the United States, Wodehouse's main canvas remained that of a pre- and post-World War I English upper class society, reflecting his birth, education and youthful writing career.

 

The Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy by Douglas Adams

On 12 October 1979 the most remarkable book ever to come out of the great publishing corporations of Ursa Minor (and Earth) was made available to humanity – The Hitchhiker’s Guide to the Galaxy. It’s an ordinary Thursday lunchtime for Arthur Dent until his house gets demolished. The Earth follows shortly afterwards to make way for a new hyperspace bypass and his best friend has just announced that he’s an alien. At this moment, they’re hurtling through space with nothing but their towels and an innocuous-looking book inscribed with the big, friendly words: DON’T PANIC. The weekend has only just begun…

 

Corridors of Death by Ruth Dudley Edwards

Battered to death with a piece of abstract sculpture titled ‘Reconciliation,’ Whitehall departmental head Sir Nicholas Clark is claimed by his colleagues to have been a fine and respected public servant cut off in his prime. Bewildered by the labyrinthine bureaucracy of Whitehall, Scotland Yard’s Superintendent Jim Milton recognizes a potential ally in Clark’s young Private Secretary, Robert Amiss.

Milton soon learns from Amiss how Whitehall works: that it can be Machiavellian and potentially homicidal, that Sir Nicholas was obnoxious and widely loathed, that he had spent the weeks before his murder upsetting and antagonizing family and associates, and that his last morning on earth had been spent gleefully observing the success of his plan to embarrass his minister and his department publicly. And they still need to discover who wielded the blunt instrument.

This is the first of Ruth Dudley Edwards’ witty, iconoclastic but warm-hearted satires about the British Establishment.

 

Things Snowball by Rich Hall

From the similarities between US gun laws and British drinking hours, to what cryptic crosswords really tell us about the British psyche, American in London Rich Hall casts a keen eye on the lunatic contradictions and weird marvels of his native and adoptive homelands in this hilarious book.

 

Something by Jasper Fforde (would require further nominations and voting)

Fforde's first novel, The Eyre Affair, was published in 2001. Fforde is mainly known for his Thursday Next novels, although he has written several books in the loosely connected Nursery Crime series and has begun two more independent series, The Last Dragonslayer and Shades of Grey.

 

Fluke by Christopher Moore

Just why do humpback whales sing? That's the question that has marine behavioural biologist Nate Quinn and his crew poking, charting, recording, and photographing very big, wet, grey marine mammals. Until the extraordinary day when a whale lifts its tail into the air to display a cryptic message spelled out in foot-high letters: Bite me.

Trouble is, Nate's beginning to wonder if he hasn't spent just a little too much time in the sun. 'Cause no one else on his team saw a thing -- not his long-time partner, Clay Demodocus; not their saucy young research assistant; not even the spliff-puffing white-boy Rastaman Kona (né Preston Applebaum). But later, when a roll of film returns from the lab missing the crucial tail.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hmm, someone's changed his/her mind!

There was a winner with three votes this morning - and now it is down to two.

That makes it a five-way draw, unless someone else adds a quick vote to one of them before tagesmann closes the poll tonight.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I tried to vote to break the tie, but didn't think about the time difference. Now what?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Well we still have a tie. But a two-way tie has been acceptable in the past.

I'll create threads for both books.

Read one or both, it's up to you. :yup:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Guest
This topic is now closed to further replies.
Sign in to follow this  

×
×
  • Create New...