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Clavain

2014 FIFA World Cup - Brazil

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You may have noticed that the greatest sporting competition in the World is on your tv,internet,radio,newspapers etc :)

Passions will run high. National honour is at stake.

But the sport promotes fairness, sporting excellence and equality.

Trouble and controversy in Brazil but I'm sure we will have a great tournament

 

Ingerlaaaannnnnddddddd :D

Will be our year.

Edited by Clavain

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At school I entered 2 sweepstakes. In the first in the science dept I got Iran and Italy. Not bad - probably got a chance with Italy. The second I got Croatia and England - which places me in a very difficult position. For the first time in my life, I may have to want England to win. £16 is at stake.

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At school I entered 2 sweepstakes. In the first in the science dept I got Iran and Italy. Not bad - probably got a chance with Italy. The second I got Croatia and England - which places me in a very difficult position. For the first time in my life, I may have to want England to win. £16 is at stake.

I have France and England (lucky draw :) ) in sweepstakes. You cannot believe how hard it will be for me to want the French to win :D

Edited by Clavain

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I am entirely oblivious to football, but I do enter the school World Cup sweepstake: a complicated affair involving points for correct scores, correct results etc, run by the jannies and the head of ICT.

I do it completely randomly, except that I try to predict wins for obviously good teams, like Spain. Other people take it way more seriously.

 

The last time, I was second or third all the way through, until the very end when I just lost out. Today, after one game, I am second!!

(The Headteacher is first. Hmmm...)

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I'm screaming for the Orange - 1 - 1 . Awesome goal :D

Mars bar bet on this :)

Great game.

Edited by Clavain

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Not interested in the World Cup but understand the passions involved. For me it's Wimbledon.

Totally understand.

I feel the same about Wimbledon :)

But this a World Cup thread?

 

2 1  and you  Nederland ...yo :D

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The dutch are heroes

Would love to be in the Nederlands tonight :D

Edited by Clavain

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Nederland you have amazed me.

Spain ?

This is the wonder and brilliance of the world cup

This game will go down in history

Edited by Clavain

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Took me a while to figure out which team was which but then the Dutch came on like gangbusters in the second half and Spain didn't have a look-in so no problem identifying the teams. I thought the Spanish team was supposed to be really strong? I like the way Google is showing the scoring, kinda neat.

 

One thing that puzzled me just before half time when a goal was scored and the attacker was way out in front of the defender when he received the ball - I thought that was offside. Must have the wrong take on the offside rule.

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Took me a while to figure out which team was which but then the Dutch came on like gangbusters in the second half and Spain didn't have a look-in so no problem identifying the teams. I thought the Spanish team was supposed to be really strong? I like the way Google is showing the scoring, kinda neat.

 

One thing that puzzled me just before half time when a goal was scored and the attacker was way out in front of the defender when he received the ball - I thought that was offside. Must have the wrong take on the offside rule.

Spanish are the the defending World and European Champions.

Defeat tonight was strange  and awesome to that scale;

Offside rule lol - must admit it can be so complex everybody including the ref and linesmen struggle :D

Edited by Clavain

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Thanks Clavain. Had asked my neighbour who watches football all the time but he was taping it as he was looking after his granddaughter who was watching cartoons, he was worried that I was going to tell him the score but I didn't do a spoiler. :)

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I'm at an agony point, which wont be the last 

I'm shouting for Australia ^^ 

Edited by Clavain

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Yes, GH, they are good and Google keeps updating the scores, very clever. Sorry that Australia didn't win against Chile.

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Yes, GH, they are good and Google keeps updating the scores, very clever. Sorry that Australia didn't win against Chile.

It is a shame, momac, but it doesn't get so much support in this country as most of the other countries competing, so I'm not really surprised.  It's not a national game here as such, Rugby and Australian Football League are the popular team sports.  AFL is played with an oval ball and has scrums etc.so is still rugby to me and I don't follow it at allas it seems more brute force than skill, but then I'm biased as I grew up with soccer which is real football. ;)

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We have soccer (football) leagues in Canada and they are beginning to pick up more supporters, mostly from people who have arrived from countries where football is THE sport.  Maybe at some time Canada will have a national team, would be nice.  I've noticed that cricket is beginning to catch on a bit too - I think that's mostly been started by immigrants from India , I quite like cricket, reminds me of my long ago home.  

Edited by momac

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That Spain v Holland match was fantastic i.e. if you were shouting for the Orange like we were.  Great goals.  Poor Spanish defending.  Who could have predicted this result.

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Before the Spain/Netherlands game last night all the pre-match hype suggested that it would almost certainly finish 0-0!!!  What a match, and not just the unexpected score but the manner in which the Spanish side was dismantled.  The two centre backs didn't know what had hit them.  Some classic goals and counter-attacking of the highest order. 

 

Could do with the England game being the 8.00 tonight as I was up at 3.30 this morning for work, but throwing coffee and Red Bull down my neck by the gallon to make it through to the final whistle (only joking, can't stand either!)  It had better be worth it.  Come on England!!!!

 

Belgium in the works sweepstake......mmmmm  not bad.

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We are Spainophiles and my daughter was in Spain, watching the finals, when they won it all a few years ago.  We ate dinner last night at the restaurant where she worked during high school and college and one of the young men there is from Chile and he was beyond excited about the match.  So we agreed to cheer for Chile, although we don't actually have very strong emotions about any of it.  Soccer is pretty much inscrutable for us.  

 

I don't know if any of you watch The IT Crowd, but this clip has been making the rounds on FB in the U.S., particularly Moss's "Hooray, he's kicked the ball.  Now the ball's over there.  That man has it now.  That's an interesting development.  Maybe he'll kick the ball.  He has indeed and apparently, that deserves a round of applause."  

 

 

It's meant to show how completely clueless we are when we are watching something that has the rest of the world so very excited.

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Always wondered why the Americans are so slow to pick up football. They have American football, and baseball which equally are a mystery to the rest of the world A World Series where no one is invited?

Don't forget the USA are in the world cup. They have the great Jurgen Klinsman as head coach, and may qualify out of the group, but will be difficult with Germany and Portugal in their group. The first match for the USA is on Monday against Ghana - Good Luck :)

 

Going out soon to watch England v Italy with a late kick off of 11pm UK time. Expecting to probably lose my voice but fall contentedly to bed in the early hours of the morning.

 

Come on Ingerllaaannnddd :D

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Watched Greece playing Colombia this morning and Colombia seemed a much faster team - didn't do that kicking back and forth between the keeper and the defenders while they looked for a good place to send the ball. Colombia just got the ball and moved it up the field quickly. It also could be that they had younger players, they were certainly fast on their feet. It was strange what got called and what got ignored, seemed like some chippy play at times but maybe that's modern football. Watching Uruguay and Costa Rica now, seem pretty evenly matched so far. Looking forward to the the English match - not so late here.:)

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My husband, a sports fanatic, dislikes soccer and hockey for the same reason, which will undoubtedly infuriate the soccer-lovers among you:  he thinks they are both way too sloppy.  I'm not sure that's the common objection in the U.S. I think the common objection is that it's slow and nothing happens.  However, that's so very excruciatingly true about baseball and many, including my husband, just love baseball.  So I don't think that's it.  Really, I think it's what you watched growing up, which means that no one will every develop a love for it in the U.S.

 

We have the World Cup on at home if there's no baseball or basketball to watch (because we have sports on at home all the time), but it's sort of background noise.  

 

I like attending basketball games, although I don't love watching it on TV.  I love watching college football on TV and in person, but don't care for pro football.  And I find baseball unbearable.  I won't go with the family to games and I won't watch it on TV.  I've tried to quit talking about how awful it is in front of my daughter's boyfriend, who was the catcher on his college team and thought about going pro, but everyone knows how I feel.  

 

Once, early in our marriage, my husband was riveted to the TV and when I asked him something, he said:

 

"I can't talk now.  This is just too exciting."  

 

"Really," I asked, "what's going on?"  

 

"This pitcher is about to pitch a perfect game."  

 

"What's that?" I asked, in all innocence.  

 

"It's a game where no one gets on base."  

 

I was shocked. "You mean, the most exciting thing that can happen in baseball is nothing?" When he acknowledged that that was one way of describing it, I said, "Baseball is a stupid sport."  

 

Ugh.

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"This pitcher is about to pitch a perfect game."  

 

I was shocked. "You mean, the most exciting thing that can happen in baseball is nothing?" When he acknowledged that that was one way of describing it, I said, "Baseball is a stupid sport."  

 

Random baseball trivia fact: more men have orbited the moon [24] than have thrown a perfect game in major league baseball [23]...

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