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This is not your normal theatrical biography, though Felicity Kendal does describe her career and its sucesses this book was written while her father lay dieing and is largely a paean to him.

 

Geoffrey Kendal was a beloved monster, charming, beguiling and utterly selfish.  He fell in love with India and the idea of setting up a touring Shakespearean troupe and that's exactly what he did, dragging his long suffering actress wife, 13 year old daughter and baby Felicity in his wake.  The story of Felicity's peripatetic childhood travelling all over India, taking her first role aged six, snatching her schooling where she could (at one school she took two exams and came top in Urdu and bottom in English) is utterly fascinating.  Her sister, one of the company's lead actresses married one of Bollywood's rising heartthrobs much to their father's rage - he wanted to keep his troop together, later on the same thing happened when  Felicity broke away and tried to launch an acting career.  She was woefully ill equipped since she knew nothing of how to behave in swinging London or even what was required for an audition since she'd never had to do one.

 

For me this latter part was less interesting than India though Felicity's charm and style of writing carried it through.  She never says anything nasty about anyone - except about herself - but the result is far from anodyne as she's a clever enough writer to let you make up your own mind about the people she's describing.

 

White Cargo is out of print but if you like to read about unusual lives I'd recommend hunting out a second hand copy.

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I think most males in the UK who were teenagers and above remember Felicity Kendal in The Good Life (apparently Good Neighbours in the US) during the late 70s to early 80s. :)

Kind of a sex symbol to most generations. Saw her recently interviewed on the BBC news and she still is a person who never "says nothing nasty about anyone" at 67.Lovely woman and actress.

Looked on Amazon Viccie and used copies are available http://www.amazon.co.uk/White-Cargo-memoir-Felicity-Kendal/dp/0140271589/ref=sr_1_cc_2?s=aps&ie=UTF8&qid=1400871973&sr=1-2-catcorr&keywords=felicity+kendal

Please click on "I'd like to read this on the Kindle" link. This should be available.

Edited by Clavain

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