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Hazel

Knitting

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Right, I have been teaching myself to knit and have been knitting a long scarf - this is my first effort, and I think I have cocked up. I knitted right to the end of the wool instead of leaving a length to cast off. Now, if I take apart the last few rows to get a length then I lose my stitches and can't then cast off. How on earth do I fix this?

 

megustaleer - I am looking at you...

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You laugh...but I considered tying on another bit to finish, but I don't have any of the same wool - it's lilac tweed and the only other wool I have in the house is dark turquoise.

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Now we all know that Meg is the expert knitter here, as well as others I have probably forgotten about.  However, I have some experience of knitting over the years.

 

Hazel, I am assuming that by saying if you 'take apart the last few rows' you mean taking all the stitches off one of the needles and just unravelling it.  I think what you need to do is undo the last row one stitch at a time.  That way you will keep stitches on the needle all the time.  Then when you think after one row or two you have enough thread to cast off, you just do that.

 

If this does not make sense, have you tried looking up YouTube for instructional videos?  I have found some great techniques there.

 

Good luck!  And welcome to the world of knitting.

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Hi Hazel, so glad to hear that you're learning to knit, it's a brilliant thing to do.  Sign up to Ravelry and dive in to an alternative universe!

 

But first, Google "youtube how to tink" and watch one of the videos - tinking is knitting backwards (see what they did  there?!) which as Barblue says is the best thing to do.  Ripping your knitting out is much more risky, it's worth taking the time for a couple of rows.

 

Hope you enjoy your finished scarf.

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Hazel, so sorry that I haven't been around to help you with your dilemma.

Jen and Barblue have given sound advice - unpicking one stitch at a time is the best way to go if you've only a couple of rows to undo (probably 3rows in your case).

Taking the whole lot off the needles and ripping back is only to be attempted if you have made a dreadfully obvious mistake at least a dozen rows back, and you just can't hide it or live with it  :naughty:

 

As suggested by Barblue and Jen (who is a much more "expert" than I am, I didn't even know that "tink" was knit, backwards), YouTube is the way to go.

 

I hope your scarf is now finished, and that you are pleased with it.

A hat next?

 

Oh, and do follow Jen's suggestion re signing up to Ravelry - lots of advice and support available there.

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I didn't even know that "tink" was knit, backwards),

 

I didn't know that either - but very witty! I love knitting, but haven't done any for quite a while.  Glad you're back, Meg! :)

 

Right, I have been teaching myself to knit and have been knitting a long scarf

 

I hope you managed to finish your scarf, Hazel?

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I hope you managed to finish your scarf, Hazel?

 

I have.  Remember that I knitted almost to the end of the wool so I used Youtube to show me how to unknit then cast off. Once that was done I noticed that the beginning of the scarf was a normal width but towards the end it was almost double width. I must have been adding on stitches by splitting the wool as I went! It's ridiculous. I now have a lovely lilac tweed scarf that is both huge in length (it wraps around me about 5 times) and oddly wide at one end (it could almost be a shawl). But I am deeply proud of it and can't wait till winter so I can cosy down with it on the sofa!

 

My next project is a baby blanket. My sister gave me the lovely news that she is expecting again in October. I did a cross stitch for her first baby and I'd like to do a patchwork knitted blanket for this baby. How hard can it be to do squares and knit them altogether?!

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My next project is a baby blanket. My sister gave me the lovely news that she is expecting again in October. I did a cross stitch for her first baby and I'd like to do a patchwork knitted blanket for this baby. How hard can it be to do squares and knit them altogether?!

 

Indeed, how bad can it be? Umm - you want the bad news? Or the good?  The bad news is that it could end up being rather 'abstract'. The good news is that she'll love it anyway. :love:

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Indeed, how bad can it be? Umm - you want the bad news? Or the good?  The bad news is that it could end up being rather 'abstract'. The good news is that she'll love it anyway. :love:

 

:D Abstract is probably the word for it!

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Wouldn't mind seeing a picture of the scarf, it sounds ideal to me!

I will do that luna as soon as poss. Alas I don't think a picture will do the ridiculousness of it justice.

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Picture now up on the BGO FB page. As you look at it, the normal width is on the left and the ridiculous width on the right. Please ignore my bright green T-shirt.

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That looks really cosy - and I'd have no concerns about wearing it in public. It's just the thing to keep you warm when there's an east wind blowing.

I admire your patience knitting that amount without any change of stitch or (legitimate) shaping.

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I am pretty good at repetitive task especially if I take ages and get to watch TV while I am doing it! And to be fair meg, I am not confident enough yet to do anything different other than straight knitting.

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Picture now up on the BGO FB page. As you look at it, the normal width is on the left and the ridiculous width on the right. Please ignore my bright green T-shirt.

Not managed to find the FB page...please put me out my misery and let me see :)

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Not managed to find the FB page...please put me out my misery and let me see :)

Clavain, the FB page is in the Book Group Online section of the FB, the picture of Hazel with her marvellous scarf is in that section.

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Neither RG or I have ever joined FB as we have never felt the need but hearing that BGO has a page I think that I might have to sign up after all. I did not know that members of BGO post photos in that way.

 

As to the knitting, I think that I did so much when the kids were small and my cousins had babies that I got to the stage that I could not face knitting another thing. I took up crocheting instead and have made many blankets. The kids nicknamed them mum's "not well blankets" and still have at least one each. I find it very therapeutic. Like Hazel I can do it while watching TV. In fact last night I crocheted throughout the Eurovisio Song Contest and actually managed to stay awake for the whole thing! Quite a feat for me!

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Hazel, I'm afraid I won't be able to see the pic of the scarf, as I don't 'do' Facebook; but from all reaction so far, it's gone down a treat. Well done. :clap:

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I am pretty good at repetitive task especially if I take ages and get to watch TV while I am doing it! And to be fair meg, I am not confident enough yet to do anything different other than straight knitting.

The sheer repetitiveness of knitting makes it therapeutic - ideal for switching off all the stresses encountered at work. It can relax the mind on the easy bits and then distract it when it becomes more mathematical.

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The sheer repetitiveness of knitting makes it therapeutic - ideal for switching off all the stresses encountered at work. It can relax the mind on the easy bits and then distract it when it becomes more mathematical.

But does anyone else find that their state of mind affects their knitting - or crochet?  With knitting, personally, I don't have much of a problem, but in the past I have found that if I am stressed my crochet tension can become very erratic. 

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