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Guest AvidReader

I read books set in Asia, books about Asia, books by Asians (regardless of where in the world they may reside), books about the immigrant experience, and basically anything that can by any definition broad or narrow be called 'Asian'.  I have deliberately made this broad, broad, broad because I don't want to get bogged down in discussion ending arguments about who or who isn't Asian and if a book is or is not 'Asian'. If it is about Asia, Asians, an Asian experience or written by some one who is Asian - its in! 

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Some great books there, I loved a wild sheep chase and have read all but one of the Chen books. I loved how Qiu Xiaolong wove bit of Chinese history and culture as well as quiet a bit of the Chinese classics into the story.

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Wow.  Someone with a longer TBR than me! 

 

I have read (in paper, should that make a difference): 

 

Jung Chang

Wild Swans: Three Daughters of China

James Clavell

Shogun with Tai Pan on the TBR

Anita Diamant

The Red Tent

 

Must confess I had no idea that Anita Diamant/The Red Tent is Asian.

 

Have you read

 

Gavin Menzies

            1421:The Year China Discovered The World ?

 

I realise that you have more than enough to be going on with but this book fascinated me and is well worth considering, imho.

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Guest AvidReader

I manfully struggled through half of it thinking it should be fascinating but I could not struggle through the awful writing any further, not to mention the constant "references" to his website . Bought the book, but I must go read the website for free to know what you're trying to say? uhuhhh

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really "the tigers wife" by tea obreht on the list of asian related? i am interested as to how. i thought it was excellent but the asian connection i've missed.

 

i've read on asian books have been by mohsin hamid, khaled hosseini, jeet thayil, yiyun li, the wonderful "blind mans garden" by nadeem aslam and one from salman rushdie (midnight's children). on the topic of books related to asia, "life of pi" by yan martel and "the thousand of jacob de zoet" by david mitchell and "empire of the sun" by jg ballard

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Guest AvidReader

Possession by A.S. Byatt is one of my favorite books, but I can't remember anything about Asia in it. Maybe I've just forgotten?

 

That shows what happens when you work from memory with a book list of 2356 books :P. All I can say is oops. 

 

 

really "the tigers wife" by tea obreht on the list of asian related? i am interested as to how. i thought it was excellent but the asian connection i've missed.

 

See my reasoning above -- oops.  LOL

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Asia is such a vast and diverse place. From Siberian steppes to Papuan rainforests to Arabian deserts to Indian market stalls.We have Chinese, Japanese, Thais, Tamils, Turks, Georgians, Lebanese, Mongols, Uzbeks and so many more nationalities. And increasingly, you have Australia seeking to stake a claim to a place in Asia.

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Asia is such a vast and diverse place. From Siberian steppes to Papuan rainforests to Arabian deserts to Indian market stalls.We have Chinese, Japanese, Thais, Tamils, Turks, Georgians, Lebanese, Mongols, Uzbeks and so many more nationalities. And increasingly, you have Australia seeking to stake a claim to a place in Asia.

 

That is one of the many reasons that it is so fascinating. 

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I am busy reading the Genhis Khan series by Conn Iggulden and I am thoroughly enjoying them, it is so interesting to see what life was like back then and learning a bit more of the culture as this was a pivotal point in their history and culture. And just learning a bit more about him is interesting as I am interested in that time in history.

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I'm hesitant to add to your impressive list, AvidReader, but have you also considered reading Ma Jian (UK based Chinese exile, particularly noted for his travelogue Red Dust), Vikram Seth (A Suitable Boy may be epic in scale but worth every page) or the Booker winning Sri Lankan Michael Ondaatje? 

 

If you like psychological thrillers I'd point you in the direction of Natsuo Kirino's excellent Out. 

 

J G Ballard's magnificent Empire of the Sun is missing too, as is  the early work of Kazuo Ishiguro, such as A Pale View of Hills and An Artist of the Floating World. Like the Ballard book, his later When We Were Orphans is also set in mid-20th century Shanghai, but immediately before rather than during the Second World War. 

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Guest AvidReader

Hey I take any and all suggestions. I have read Michael Ondaantje (The English Patient) but only just learned that he was born in Sri Lanka - only just in that it was after I did the list LOL.

 

I don't have a copy of An Artist of the Floating World but I may have read it. I sometimes need to have the book to refresh my memory.  Ditto for A Suitable Boy. I have read a number of other Indian authors over the years but ... um A House for Mr Biswas (unsure of the author off the top of my head) springs to mind. And I know I read more than one book by that same author. And there was another by a female author about the Neem tree in their backyard. Ok it wasn't about the tree as such, but the tree was the focus of the family relationships, or something like that. 

 

I have also read E. M. Forster's A Passage to India, Kipling of course and a host of other books, so this list is by no means exhaustive. It is just the books I have on my reader at present. As I've said elsewhere I'm slowly trying to build up a comprehensive library with all the books I have read over the years, as well as all the yummy new books I still have to read :) So yeah bring the suggestions on - even if I have read them, seeing the title again reminds me I've read them and it goes on the 'to be bought' list.

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If you haven't read them, I highly recommend The Girl Who Played Go by Shan Sa and In the Shadow of the Banyan by Vaddy Ratner. Also, if you don't mind a little bit of fantasy, Under Heaven by Guy Gavriel Kay is set in a sort of alternative Tang Dynasty China and is fabulous.

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Timothy Mo's books about Hong Kong are wonderful.

 

Have you tried Rohinton Mistry? 

Animal's People by Indra Sinhla (close contender for the Booker and written by the ex fiancé of a friend of mine).

The White Tiger - Aravind Adiga

books by Amitav Gosh

The Namesake - Jhumpa Lahri

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Guest AvidReader

If you haven't read them, I highly recommend The Girl Who Played Go by Shan Sa and In the Shadow of the Banyan by Vaddy Ratner. Also, if you don't mind a little bit of fantasy, Under Heaven by Guy Gavriel Kay is set in a sort of alternative Tang Dynasty China and is fabulous.

 

I will look those up thanks and I have a bunch Guy Gavriel Kay I need to read, including that one. My acquisitions are a bit ahead of my reading at the moment. 

 

 

Timothy Mo's books about Hong Kong are wonderful.

 

Have you tried Rohinton Mistry? 

Animal's People by Indra Sinhla (close contender for the Booker and written by the ex fiancé of a friend of mine).

The White Tiger - Aravind Adiga

books by Amitav Gosh

The Namesake - Jhumpa Lahri

 

Another group I will look up. I think I read some of Timothy Mo's books a year or 3 ago. Ah yes I did - I read Sour Sweet and The Monkey King. 

 

I just read The Lowland by Jhumpa Lahiri and loved it.

 

Ditto on the look up.

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