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Nominations for the 2nd 2014 BGO Book Group Read

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I am kicking off two BGO Book Group Reads today. They will start concurrently but it will take longer to decide on the second read...

 

Please can we have your nominations for the Second BGO Book Group read of 2014?

 

The subject of this read is An Author.

 

The nominations will have two stages.

1. Pick an author

2. Pick a book.

 

So please nominate an author that you think we should read.

 

Please post your nominations here. It is always a good idea to give a reason for your nomination. You don't need to post much, a couple of lines will do.

 

If you like a nomination please second it.

 

All nominations that are seconded will go forward to a vote.

 

Once we have agreed an author we will nominate books by that author. So nominating authors who have only published one book may not be a good idea (but it is up to you). This one is a bit of an experiment...

 

If you are new to BGO or have not been involved in a BGO read before, please see this thread  http://www.bookgroup...-bgo-bookgroup/ for some background.

 

And if you have any questions please post them.    

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I would like to nominate Wallace Stegner and the book I would like to nominate is Crossing to Safety.

 

Dan and I recently read (and commented as we were reading) another of Stegner's books, Angle of Repose, and we both just loved it.  It was by far my best read of 2013.  I noticed that grasshopper had read another of his books The Spectator Bird and said she would be glad to read more of his books.  And cherrypie has already purchased a copy of Crossing to Safety (as have I) in the hope that it would be a group read.  

 

From Publisher's Weekly:

Adding to a distinguished body of work that already has earned him a Pulitzer Prize and the National Book Awardand on the 50th anniversary of the publication of his first novelStegner's new book is an eloquent, wise and immensely moving narrative. It is a meditation on the idealism and spirit of youth, when the world is full of promise, and on the blows and compromises life inevitably inflicts. Two couples meet during the Depression years in Madison, Wis., and become devoted friends despite vast differences in upbringing and social status. Hard work, hope and the will to succeed as a writer motivate the penurious narrator Larry Morgan and his wife Sally as he begins a term teaching at the university. Equally excited by their opportunities are Sid Lang, another junior man in the English department, and his wife Charity. They are fortune's children, favored with intelligence, breeding and money. Taken into the Langs' nourishing and generous embrace, the Morgans have many reasons for gratitude over the years, especially when Sally is afflicted with polio and the Langs provide financial as well as moral support. During visits at the Langs' summer home on Battell Pond in Vermont and later sharing a year in Florence, the couples feel that they are "four in Eden." Yet the Morgans observe the stresses in their friends' marriage as headstrong, insufferably well-organized Charity tries to bully the passive Sid into a more aggressive mold. Charity is one of the most vivid characters in fiction; if she is arrogant, she is also kindhearted, enthusiastic, stalwart and bravean ardent liver of life. Her incandescent personality is both the dominant force and the source of strain in the enduring friendship Stegner conveys with brilliant artistry. He is also superb at expressing a sense of place, and his intelligent voice makes cogent observations on American society in the decades of his setting. But most importantly, he speaks to us of universal questions, reflecting on "the miserable failure of the law of nature to conform to the dream of man." In doing so, he has created a believable human drama the dimensions of which reach out beyond the story's end and resonate in the reader's heart.

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I'd second this nomination, Binker has mentioned Stenger a couple of times and not having read any of his books I'd be interested in reading this one.

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:)Perfect happenstance - I downloaded audible Crossing to Safety by Wallace Stegner last night, as I really look forward to reading  it,  and now read this post early today.  I 'm not sure if you need another second, but will happily do so for this author and book and glad to join in if it is chosen as the Group Read.

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I just read the directions more carefully (bad sign in a newly-minted moderator) and I was only supposed to nominate Wallace Stegner.  So, consider him nominated and everyone knows which book grasshopper, momac, and I want to read when it comes to the next step.

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William Boyd.

 

I think the first book I read by William Boyd was sent to me through one of the postal bookgroups I used to belong to. I certainly wouldn't have picked it up of my own volition, but surprisingly I enjoyed it.

I have read several of his other books, and approached all of them with the same wariness, but have enjoyed every one.

 These days, if I can't decide what I want to read next, I feel that I probably won't go wrong if i pick up one by Boyd.

I have yet to be disappointed.

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I've never read anything by William Boyd, so I would second that. Although I'm good with Stegner as well.

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I recently bought Crossing to Safety by Wallace Stegner so would agree with that one.

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I recently bought Crossing to Safety by Wallace Stegner so would agree with that one.

And I have a library copy sitting at the side of the bed ready to read...

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Whilst I find both the above nominations intriguing, I would like to nominate Jim Crace.  I have noted that he was nominated for, short-listed and has won many literary prizes over the years.  But I was drawn to him because he was brought up in my home town of Enfield around the same time as I lived there.  A bit tenuous I know, but I already have two of his books and would love to try one of them and get freed-back from others here.

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I thought that I had no-one to nominate and then three came along at once! 

 

I'd like to nominate one of my very favourite authors, Raymond Chandler.  Read a few of his and just love the way the prose reads. Apparently - I looked it up on the internet - he's considered to be one of the founders of the Hard-Boiled school of detective fiction.  Philip Marlowe is in a series of his as a private detective and I don't think that the opportunity of reading Chandler should be missed, he's absolutely marvellous.

 

I'd also like to nominate China Mielville.  I've read one of his and currently reading another and they are absolutely marvellous.  It's more difficult to pin him down to a genre and I don't really think that it matters but If you've never heard of him you need an idea.  I read The City and The City, which is classed as an existential thriller and is very surreal, it could also be thought of as contemporary fantasy.  If that's not to your taste - and there is a lot of profanity in it - I'm currently reading Perdido Street Station which is classed as fantasy also but has mutants and all sorts of weird things in it (I'm only on chapter 6).  Mielville is considered as part of the "new weird" type of writing (I don't think that it's even a sub-genre).  I'll grant you that he's not to everybody's taste, which is a shame so I'm not expecting it to be seconded but I'd like to nominate anyway because sci-fi/fantasy/new weird is not usually represented and I like it! :naughty:

 

Stephen King. 'Nuff said.

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I'd certainly second all of lbmc's nominations, but particularly Mieville.

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I will be closing part one of  this nomination process on Monday.

 

Nominations so far:

Wallace Stegner

William Boyd

Raymond Chandler

Jim Crace

China Mielville

Stephen King

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As Binker mentioned I am a huge Stegner fan. But I like, or would like to read, all of the authors mentioned, although I'm pretty sure I've read all the Chandler and King I need to in this short lifetime :-)

Edited by Dan

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