Jump to content
tagesmann

Nominations for the 1st 2014 BGO Book Group Read

Recommended Posts

I don't think I'll be participating in this particular book read as I think the less time I spend in the kitchen the less I will be thinking about food.  Neither one of us is sylph like and we could do with eating less rather than trying recipes which look really tantalizing.  I like the idea of Healing Foods and may just try to get a copy of that and maybe that will provide a guide to healthier eating habits - we do eat lots of salads but somehow salads in extremely cold weather aren't very appealing.  I bake but don't do much in the way of fancy meals and as we don't entertain any more I don't have any call to attempt fancy cooking.

I'm feeling the same as momac with this one. At the moment I'm not doing a lot of cookbook cooking.Trying to eat simply to maintain my fitness. The kitchen is a danger zone! Although once it gets a bit warmer I will resume making my usual sourdough bread which will be safely frozen and only taken out as needed. I may be up for some interesting fiction though. Grasshopper,s suggestion sounds interesting, an insight into bizarre French mannerisms!

Edited by Cassie

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I like the sound of home baked sourdough bread Cassie.  Hubby used to bake bread, however, we found that everyone was waiting with a knife and butter for it to come out of the oven and be cool enough to eat!  Shouldn't be a problem now though as there are only the three of us in the house - might suggest he might like to bake some bread but it's been a while since he did it.  The smell of bread baking is wonderful.  We do use low calorie margarine now though so it may not be quite as tasty!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I absolutely detest cooking and, as a result, I'm not very good at it.  I do have two cook books of my own and never use them but being vegetarian seems to make me the enemy in some quarters!

 

I'm following this discussion with interest, however.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I should like to recommend this:-

 

Curry: A Tale of Cooks and Conquerors by Lizzie Collingham

 

Our son recommended it to me and I found it engrossing.  Here's a paragraph from Amazon -

 

"There has certainly been a seismic change in recent writing on food, as Lizzie Collingham's Curry: The Biography divertingly proves. The subject here is nothing less than the history of India and its rulers, as told through the history of their signature food. Of course, the national food of India is now (by default) one of the national foods of the United Kingdom, and its all-conquering progress from the gilded palaces of Delhi to the curry houses of Brick Lane and Birmingham makes for highly entertaining reading.

We have had many cookery books before on how to prepare the mouth-watering Indian delights described here, but few have taken such a broad view as Collingham, who (while telling us how to prepare Dhansak or Lamb Korma), also apprises the reader of the individuals who discovered, cooked and presented these dishes originally (along with the lucky recipients, often in the upper echelons of Indian society).

In many ways, the rich host of anecdotes here is the single factor that distinguishes the book from so many similar titles. Collingham is a historian of some reputation, but her love of this food fairly leaps from the page. Be warned, however: you may begin this book in a spirit of historical curiosity, but by the end of it, you'll either be making your way to the local curry house, or to the nearest supermarket to stock up on turmeric, coriander and mango chutney."

 

It's available as an e-book and in paperback and on both sides of the pond..

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I should like to recommend this:-

 

Curry: A Tale of Cooks and Conquerors by Lizzie Collingham

 

Our son recommended it to me and I found it engrossing.  Here's a paragraph from Amazon -

 

"There has certainly been a seismic change in recent writing on food, as Lizzie Collingham's Curry: The Biography divertingly proves. The subject here is nothing less than the history of India and its rulers, as told through the history of their signature food. Of course, the national food of India is now (by default) one of the national foods of the United Kingdom, and its all-conquering progress from the gilded palaces of Delhi to the curry houses of Brick Lane and Birmingham makes for highly entertaining reading.

We have had many cookery books before on how to prepare the mouth-watering Indian delights described here, but few have taken such a broad view as Collingham, who (while telling us how to prepare Dhansak or Lamb Korma), also apprises the reader of the individuals who discovered, cooked and presented these dishes originally (along with the lucky recipients, often in the upper echelons of Indian society).

In many ways, the rich host of anecdotes here is the single factor that distinguishes the book from so many similar titles. Collingham is a historian of some reputation, but her love of this food fairly leaps from the page. Be warned, however: you may begin this book in a spirit of historical curiosity, but by the end of it, you'll either be making your way to the local curry house, or to the nearest supermarket to stock up on turmeric, coriander and mango chutney."

 

It's available as an e-book and in paperback and on both sides of the pond..

Sounds interesting, Chuntzy, I'll second the nomination.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

If nothing else, this has generated a fair deal of discussion.

 

We only have two books formally nominated and seconded.

 

Healing Foods by Miriam Polunin

Curry: A Tale of Cooks and Conquerors by Lizzie Collingham.

 

The nominations will close (sometime) on Monday but it looks likes we may not bother going forward with this one.  :)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I think Omnivore's dilemma received a second. Also I'd nominate Devils Larder by Jim Crace, to go with Barblue's nomination of him on the 2nd group read page.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Guest AvidReader

Mistress of Spices - Divakaruni, Chitra Banerjee

 

To those customers who visit her Indian spice shop in Oakland, California, Tilo dispenses wisdom and the appropriate spice; fenugreek makes a rejected wife desirable again. But her powers are limited, for they vanish the moment she falls in love.

 

 

Like Water for Chocolate - Laura Esquivel

 

Earthy, magical, and utterly charming, this tale of family life in tum-of-the-century Mexico became a best-selling phenomenon with its winning blend of poignant romance and bittersweet wit.

 

 

Chocolat - Joanne Harris

 

 

Greeted as "an amazement of riches ... few readers will be able to resist" by The New York Times, Chocolat is an enchanting novel about a small French town turned upside down by the arrival of a bewitching chocolate confectioner, Vianne Rocher, and her spirited young daughter.

 

 

Fried Green Tomatoes at the Whistle Stop Cafe - Fannie Flag

 

Folksy and fresh, endearing and affecting, Fried Green Tomatoes at the Whistle Stop Cafe is thenow-classic novel of two women in the 1980s; of gray-headed Mrs. Threadgoode telling her life story toEvelyn, who is in the sad slump of middle age. The tale she tells is also of two women--of theirrepressibly daredevilish tomboy Idgie and her friend Ruth--who back in the thirties ran a little place inWhistle Stop, Alabama, a Southern kind of Cafe Wobegon offering good barbecue and good coffee and all kinds of love and laughter, even an occasional murder. And as the past unfolds, the present--for Evelyn and for us--will never be quite the same again... Airplanes and television have removed the Threadgoodes from the Southern scene. Happily for us, Fannie Flagg has preserved a whole community of them in a richly comic, poignant narrative that records the exuberance of their lives, the sadness of their departure.

 

The Last Chinese Chef - Nicole Mones

 

Struggling to get back on her feet in the wake of her husband's premature death and stunned by a paternity suit against her husband's estate, food writer Maggie McElroy plans a trip to China to investigate the claim and to profile rising chef Sam Liang, who introduces her to the Chinese concept of food, while drawing her into his extended family and helping her come to terms with her life.

 

 

 

Pomegranate Soup - Marsha Mehran

 

Three Iranian sisters--Marjan, Layla, and Bahar Aminpour--flee the turmoil of the Islamic Revolution in their native country to seek refuge in Ireland, where they open the exotic Babylon Café amongst the quirky inhabitants of a colorful Irish town, in a debut novel that comes complete with original Persian recipes.

 

 

Bone in the Throat - Anthony Bourdain

 

 

A wildly funny, irreverent tale of murder, mayhem, and the mob.

When up-and-coming chef Tommy Pagana settles for a less than glamorous stint at his uncle's restaurant in Manhattan's Little Italy, he unwittingly finds himself a partner in big-time crime. And when the mob decides to use the kitchen for a murder, nothing Tommy learned in cooking school has prepared him for what happens next. With the FBI on one side, and his eccentric wise guy superiors on the other, Tommy has to struggle to do right by his conscience, and to avoid getting killed in the meantime.

In the vein of Prizzi's Honor , Bone in the Throat is a thrilling Mafia caper laced with entertaining characters and wry humor. This first novel is a must-have for fans of Anthony Bourdain's nonfiction.

 

 

Secrets of the Tsil Cafe - Thomas Fox Averill

 

Wes Hingler lives in the shadow of his eccentric, fiercely opinionated cook parents, whose separate kitchens and shared bedroom spontaneously combust into battlegrounds at the flip of a spatula. Argument and habanero chile are the dominant spices of Wes's life, permeating the ever-tense atmosphere of Kansas City's Tsil Café (his father's Southwestern/Native American restaurant) and the kitchen of Buen AppeTito (his mother's eclectic catering business). Professional rivalries, romantic triangles, and assorted betrayals all make for a volatile upbringing

 

The Book of Salt - Monique Truong

 

Considering whether he will accompany his employers, Gertrude Stein and Alice B. Toklas, to America, a personal cook remembers his youth in French-colonial Vietnam, his years as a galley hand at sea, and his days cooking for the doyennes of the Lost Generation.

 

 

Crescent - Diana Abu-Jaber

 

Thirty-nine-year-old Sirine, never married, lives with a devoted Iraqi-immigrant uncle and an adoring dog named King Babar. She works as a chef in a Lebanese restaurant, her passions aroused only by the preparation of food—until an unbearably handsome Arabic literature professor starts dropping by for a little home cooking. Falling in love brings Sirene's whole heart to a boil—stirring up memories of her parents and questions about her identity as an Arab American.

 

 

The Language of Baklava - Diana Abu-Jaber

 

Diana Abu-Jabers vibrant, humorous memoir weaves together stories of being raised by a food-obsessed Jordanian father with tales of Lake Ontario shish kabob cookouts and goat stew feasts under Bedouin tents in the desert. These sensuously evoked repasts, complete with recipes, in turn illuminate the two cultures of Diana's childhood - American and Jordanian - while helping to paint a loving and complex portrait of her impractical, displaced immigrant father who, like many an immigrant before him, cooked to remember the place he came from and to pass that connection on to his children. The Language of Baklava irresistably invites us to sit down at the table with Diana's family, sharing unforgettable meals that turn out to be as much about grace, difference, faith, love as they are about food.

Edited by AvidReader

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Nominations closed on Monday.

We are just waiting for tagesman to put up the poll - if there's enough people sufficiently interested to continue with the subject

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Guest AvidReader

I think that although 'cookery' immediately conjours cooking books - there is neither much to read or discuss about a book of recipes - other than to get into a discussion of which was your favourite.  However if you think of books with chefs, food, cooking, restaurants etc as an integral part of the theme there are many out there.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

If I can second more than one book I would like to second these three. :)

 

Bone in the Throat - Anthony

Bourdain

 

Chocolat - Joanne Harris

 

Mistress of Spices - Divakaruni,

Chitra Banerjee

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I think maybe what Meg was saying that nominations for the Book Group Read for this particular read had already closed on Monday and just awaiting the poll post so that voting can be done on the ones already nominated.  That was my understanding of her post. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Guest AvidReader

I think maybe what Meg was saying that nominations for the Book Group Read for this particular read had already closed on Monday and just awaiting the poll post so that voting can be done on the ones already nominated.  That was my understanding of her post. 

 

well there was no notice to that effect so one can be excused for not knowing that

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Nominations closed on Monday.

We are just waiting for tagesman to put up the poll - if there's enough people sufficiently interested to continue with the subject

Hello AvidReader - this is the post I referred to. You put together a good selection and maybe it can be used at another time - it's up to the Mods whether they want to do anything about your suggestions, was just trying to clarify for your information as this is maybe new to you. :)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Guest AvidReader

Hello AvidReader - this is the post I referred to. You put together a good selection and maybe it can be used at another time - it's up to the Mods whether they want to do anything about your suggestions, was just trying to clarify for your information as this is maybe new to you. :)

 

yes that was after my post not before :)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Guest AvidReader

Hi AvidReader - it did say further up the thread that nominations closed on Monday, but it was easy to miss. Don't worry about it: I'm sure it will get sorted out!

 

aah well yes I did miss it ... never mind ... makes little or no difference to me, thanks.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

well there was no notice to that effect so one can be excused for not knowing that

Sorry everyone. I've been horribly busy and so neglected the site. Nominations are now closed. And so is this thread.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Guest
This topic is now closed to further replies.

  • Similar Content

    • By tagesmann
      Hello everyone,
       
      The them for the next BGO Book Group read is... Humour.
       
      I think that is a pretty open subject so please nominate a book and explain why you think it makes a good group read.
       
       
    • By tagesmann
      The nominations are:
       
      Healing Foods by Miriam Polunin
       
       
       
      The Omnivore's Dilemma by Michael Pollan
       
       
       
      Curry: A Tale of Cooks and Conquerors by Lizzie Collingham
       
       
       
      Bone in the Throat by Anthony Bourdain
       
       
       
      Chocolat by Joanne Harris
       
       
       
      Mistress of Spices by Chitra Divakaruni
       
       
    • By tagesmann
      The nominations are:
       
      The Adventures of Sherlock Holmes (1892)
       
       
      The Adventure of the Speckled Band (1892)
       
       
      The Hound of the Baskervilles (1901-2)
       
       
      The House of Silk (2012)
    • By tagesmann
      Please can we have your nominations for the next BGO Book Group read.
       
      The subject of this read is Sherlock Holmes. But what you choose to nominate is up to you. You might choose one of the Sherlock Holmes novels, or one of the short stories. Perhaps a collection of the short stories or something about Sherlock Holmes, fiction or non-fiction. It's up to you.
       
      Please post your nominations here. It is always a good idea to give a reason for your nomination. You don't need to post much, a couple of lines will do.
       
      If you fancy reading something, then please second it.
       
      All nominations that are seconded will go forward to a vote.
       
      If you are new to BGO or have not been involved in a BGO read before, please see this thread  http://www.bookgrouponline.com/topic/5788-introduction-to-the-bgo-bookgroup/ for some background.
       
      And if you have any questions please post them.  
×