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I have fond memories of the programmes tht Grammath has listed..because I watched them all with my children!:rolleyes:

 

I am of the generation whose parents bought a TV to watch the Coronation! (Sorry, forgetting my roots here. Not bought, but rented... from 'Radio Rentals!) :D

 

Which makes William Hartnell my 'Dr Who' :eek:

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Yes Blakes 7, absolutely brilliant and the source of another crush. Avon was wonderful!! Mind you I also had a soft spot for Manolito in High Chapparal :o

 

my Doctor would probably be Tom Baker although Jon Pertwee comes a close second.

 

Sponge Bob Squarepants does NOT impress me at all. Thankfully my lot prefer the Simpsons :rolleyes:

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Dangermouse was excellent, there was a fantastic line in one of them about being "attacked by kamizake twin-tubs" :D. Other things I remember as a child were Bagpuss - probably my favourite, the Clangers, fingermouse, Mr Ben, Trumpton, the Magic Roundabout and Morph on Take Hart, I used to think that was so clever.

 

Blake's 7, best TV sci-fi programme ever, started when I was about 9. The sets wobbled, the special effects were anything but special and they simply could not light the Liberator properly, but it was wonderful nonetheless.

 

Dangermouse was so cool!!!!!!! There was some other programme with puppet mice too, in the 80s (i don't know if someone my age should really be on this thread), and you could send off for your own puppet mouse. Anyway, by the time mine arrived I had already forgotten I ever liked the puppet mice programme! Children are soooo fickle!!! Was that Fingermouse?

 

Spongebob is quite cool in my books, I have my very own Spongebob which sings the theme tune and sneezes and stuff. It was a very cool gift.

 

Edited to say: But then I do find Tellytubbies quite watchable :o

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"Spongebob Squarepants" is absolute tripe.

 

Have you ever seen things like "Cow and Chicken" and "Dexter's Laboratory" and all these Japanese rubbishy things born out of that ridiculous card game?

 

It might make me sound old but the poor children of today have a really raw deal when it comes to contemporary cartoons.

 

Bit too old to have seen it first time around but "Dangermouse" is indeed excellent, as is "Count Duckula". A lot of the humour goes way over a child's head.

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I rarely watched "Dr Who" as my Father ruled the TV on/off button and if he didn't fancy it we didn't watch it!

 

Mrs RR bought me some videos of "Blakes 7" a few years ago and it was pretty good, although I would rather see "Survivors" released on DVD.

 

What do the 3 aforementioned progs have in common?

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What do the 3 aforementioned progs have in common?

 

That would be the late lamented Terry Nation, pioneering screenwriter who was instrumental in the early creation of Dr Who and was the originator of Blake's Seven and Survivors.

 

Most iconically, he was the man who brought us the Daleks, diabolical pepperpot scourges of the universe.

 

He also hopped across the pond and gave us MacGyver, but we'll forgive him that!

 

Nice bit of trivia, RR. Are you a quizzer?

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Well, my specialist subjects are Sport and Entertainment (like many) but not good enough General Knowledge to be a decent quizzer.

 

Pretty strong on music but I know there are other BGO-ers with far better knowledge than mine - and I don't know much from the mid 80s onwards actually, but stick to my era and I'm fine!

 

I didn't know Terry Nation did MacGyver!! And I din't know he was dead!

 

Didn't he also write for The Protectors or Persuaders and The Saint and The Avengers?

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Didn't he also write for The Protectors or Persuaders and The Saint and The Avengers?

 

Yep, the last three. I think he simply wrote for MacGyver rather than having a hand in its creation, to be fair. He'd moved to America by then so I suppose he was simply doing local work.

 

I forget the illness that overtook him, but like the wonderful Douglas Adams - another Who contributor - he departed well before his time.

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Hey! Survivors IS on DVD! I check for so many things and I can't believe I haven't seen that it's available now. I wonder how its stands up 30 years on...?

 

£45 for each series is a bit steep, but it's gotta be done (via the BGO Amazon link of course!).

 

Terry Nation died aged 66 from Empphysema in 1996/7. (Googled that up.)

 

During the last year I read George R Stewart's classic from 1930s (I believe) called "Earth Abides" - if you liked "Survivors" I urge you to read it - a superb book, a hugely thought provoking and ultimately optimistic look at recovery from worldwide plague. Not much action but lots of stuff about what might happen, how the old ways, cities, roads etc. which the survivors clung to initially as the way forward for civilisation, gradually become a decaying irrelevance.

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Let's not forget the shows that originated from beyond these fair shores. Heidi appeared with depressing regularity (everything was repeated ad nauseum in those days, wasn't it, which is why we are so surprised when we learn how few episodes of Mr Benn, Trumpton etc. were ever made). A more welcome repeater for me, though, was The Adventures of Robinson Crusoe. This was real boys' own stuff (as opposed to the vomit-inducing alpine girlie) with a fantastic score that lived with me so much that I bought a CD of it several years ago. It's well worth it!

 

I'm too young for Singing Ringing Trees, I'm afraid, but perhaps someone else can wax lyrical about that.

 

King of them all, though, was Monkey. This was the most outrageous stuff, a Japanese show based on Chinese legends of the Monkey King combining martial arts with mystical monsters, mythology, magic (monkey magic, no less) and humour. I've bought some of the episodes recently and they certainly stand up to the nostalgic viewing test. This series also features iconic music. I suppose translation didn't help, but if you've been looking out for great poetry, it's all in the title theme:

 

What a cocky saucy monkey this one is,

All the gods were ang-ery and they punished him,

Until he was saved by a kindly priest

And that was the start of their pilgrimage quest.

 

Wordsworth needs to get his act together, eh?

 

Monkey was a fantastic character, but I loved Pigsy too, whose mindset I was unfortunately more in tune with. As a ten year-old I was always a little confused by Tripitaka, who did indeed turn out to be a girl (in real life).

 

Just as a side note for real geeks, do you remember Star Fleet? A Japanese puppet show that I think was pretty revolutionary in having an arc plot over the entire series as opposed to stand-alone episodes. This was really exceptional in my memory (Saturday morning slot) and yet again had a fantastic theme tune (covered by Brian May, no less!). It featured the X-Bomber, a prototype spaceship that took on an invasionary force of aliens. It took another hugely unusual move in killing off a major character about a third of the way into its run, which really shocked me as a boy, but was very powerful. It was also a forerunner of Transformers, featuring three small ships that joined together to form a fighting 'robot'.

 

Well, I'll never be able to pretend to be cool in BGO again, but it was fun sharing! :cool:;)

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da da di dum di dum

da da di dum di dum di dum dum

da da di dum di dum

da da di dum di dum di dum dummmm

 

Ah yes, I remember it well!

 

Mrs RR just told me that the name Dalek supposedly came from the Index on a set of encylopaedia that Terry Nation was gazing at looking for inspiration. You know, this book covers words beginning dal - ek.

 

Sounds like an urban myth to me but quite a nice one....

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Dying in two consecutive years? That's quite a feat! I'd expect nothing less of the master of fantasy TV drama! ;)

 

Yes well, I saw some conflicting info. :) One said he was born in 1930, another said 1931, and one said he was 66 when he died another said 67, so I thought I'd cover some of the various bases!!

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Fascinating to read this thread and to be able to "date" people by it. I think I'm closest in age to Grammath, judging by the overlap!

 

Does anyone remember a bizarre cartoon called "Undercover Elephant" - he used to hide in filing cabinets and other unlikely places, I think. I used to love it, but no-one else ever seems to have heard of it.

 

King of them all, though, was Monkey. This was the most outrageous stuff, a Japanese show based on Chinese legends of the Monkey King combining martial arts with mystical monsters, mythology, magic (monkey magic, no less) and humour. I've bought some of the episodes recently and they certainly stand up to the nostalgic viewing test. This series also features iconic music.

 

Monkey was a fantastic character, but I loved Pigsy too, whose mindset I was unfortunately more in tune with. As a ten year-old I was always a little confused by Tripitaka, who did indeed turn out to be a girl (in real life).

 

 

Monkey was one of the first DVDs I rented from the Amazon rental scheme. I had such confused memories of it I wanted to check what on earth had been going on. It was just WIERD!! Husband and I had a very happy nostalgia evening. How did it all end? Did they ever find whatever it was they were looking for????

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Monkey was one of the first DVDs I rented from the Amazon rental scheme. I had such confused memories of it I wanted to check what on earth had been going on. It was just WIERD!! Husband and I had a very happy nostalgia evening. How did it all end? Did they ever find whatever it was they were looking for????

 

Don't think so. I'm not sure it ever actually ended, but like old soldiers just faded away. Presumably not re-commissioned after the final run. Probably not a bad decision either since it had gone downhill a lot. The original Pigsy was replaced by a new actor who wasn't nearly so good and the horse (who by that point we'd all forgotten was originally a dragon) began turning into a comic relief man. I wasn't impressed.

 

They also messed around with the classic music and titles. I wasn't impressed by that either.

 

So, the holy scriptures appear to remain in India, although frankly after all that time they could have circumnavigated the planet.

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What a lovely thread! I was lucky that we received the UK channels in my house as well as the Irish ones during my eminently eighties childhood.

 

I loved Mr Benn and the Trumpton et al stuff. Bagpuss was my favourite but I also liked;

 

Let's Pretend

Why Don't You (I can still sing the "rap" on the opening credits and hum the one for Heidi)

Jackanory (sp?) (Was that the one with opening song with John in different langauges; Johann and Ivan etc)

The Famous Five

Postman Pat

Super Gran

Gran

Pigeon Street

You and Me (or Me and You)

Byker Grove

Grange Hill

Fingermouse

HartBeat (or anything Tony Hart related)

Thunder (thunder thunder thunder!) cats

Dungeons and Dragons (There was a cartoon but also a kind of virtual reality board game one with a Dungeon Master - would have killed to be on it)

Roland Rat (for shame)

Wide Awake Club/Wacaday with Timmy Mallett (Mallet's mallet, word association game, mustn't pause or hesitate or get a bash on the head like this or like this). I think the liverpudlian Art Attack! guy did WAC before Mr. Mallett was unleashed.

Number 73 (and I vaguely remember other stuff with Sandy Torksvig-something-Scandanavian in )

TV AM (Wincy Willis, Rusty Lee, Lizzie the exercise woman, Ann and Nick - ah those were the days)

The Mr Men

Jamie and his Magic Torch

David and the Gnomes

Philip Scholfied and Gordon the Gopher and then Andy Peters

Live and Kicking (I really loved Philip :) )

The Care Bears

The Smurfs

Bananaman

Jimbo and the Jet Set

The Jetsons

Dogtanion and the Muskahounds

Poll Position (and LOADS of Japanese (?) imported cartoons like The Cities of Gold and The Story of Life).

 

Can't think of the name of the robot guy who used to trace the letters on the screen to teach you to right a la "up down around and over".

 

I was a bit scared of Dr Who and hated Dangermouse, Willow the Wisp, The Moomins (grrrr), The Magic Roundabout and The Pink Panther

 

There was a great drama series about a girl who used to go down to a Moon/Sun Dial in the middle of the night (reminiscent of Narnia or the Secret Garden) and also another one which was about a boy called Silas and now reminds me of Thomas Hardy novels.

 

I actually found time to read a lot as a kid - how did I fit it all in! I think it must have rained a lot in the summer before they invented all these camps the kids go to now.

 

Rebecca

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Sapphire and Steel - loved the episode on the spooky station

 

"All irregularities will be handled by the forces controlling each dimension. Transuranic heavy elements may not be used where there is life. Medium atomic weights are available: Gold, Lead, Copper, Jet, Diamond, Radium, Sapphire, Silver and Steel. Sapphire and Steel have been assigned." Ah, bliss.

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Sapphire and Steel - loved the episode on the spooky station

 

"All irregularities will be handled by the forces controlling each dimension. Transuranic heavy elements may not be used where there is life. Medium atomic weights are available: Gold, Lead, Copper, Jet, Diamond, Radium, Sapphire, Silver and Steel. Sapphire and Steel have been assigned." Ah, bliss.

 

I'm impressed you remember the entire opening voiceover, although the fact you do is at least as scary as the episode at the station! ;)

 

Even spookier is that whilst dropping off to sleep last night I'd thought I must post about Sapphire and Steel on this thread - log on today and lo! There it is already! (Cue Twighlight Zone twanging chords)

 

It was excellent. I was a huge Dr Who fan, but I found Sapphire and Steel to be far more consistently scary. I still remember vividly the character that turned round to reveal no face. Aaaarrgh!

 

I hated the ending though, when they were marooned in a cafe floating through eternity. That was a bit of a downer. :(

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Couldn't remember all of it so I did have to go and check. I used to watch it on an old black and white tv most time which made the effects far more, er,effective, really.

 

I've just gone back over one of your earlier posts and have to say...

STAAAAAAR FLEEEEEEET! an absolute sunday morning (auwww mum, can't I set the table later?) classic.

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I've just gone back over one of your earlier posts and have to say...

STAAAAAAR FLEEEEEEET! an absolute sunday morning (auwww mum, can't I set the table later?) classic.

 

Wha-haaay! Someone else does remember it! (Although I'm pretty sure it was Saturday morning - just before No. 73? Sunday mornings were pretty God-slotty/adult-education back then. Was it On The Move? A guy in a truck learning about things? I digress.)

 

If you fancy a heavy nostalgia dose, try out:

 

http://www.sfxb.co.uk/ivs/stftvideos.html

 

This is a Star Fleet site with video clips from the show, including the excellent closing titles song. I wish to point out I am not a sad anorak-wearing obsessive who lives on such sites. I was just surfing idly one night and found it. I wasn't even on the site for long after my anorak toggle got tangled in the... ahem...yes, well...

 

Anyway, enjoy! ;)

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hee hee - I'd completely forgotten 'The Skull'. Are you sure it wasn't sunday mornings? Or am I mixing it up with the annoying round and square things that used to play noughts and crosses at the end of the program? A gold star for anyone who can remember what they were called... :)

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Ah yes, Terrahawks - Gerry Anderson had been on the duff pills when he came up with that one. Thunderbirds it ain't! Do you remember Windsor Davies did the voice for one of the annoying round things? I also remember the lead character, Dr Tiger Ninestein, who had nine clones of himself. You see, 'Ninestein'. Nine clones of himself. Brilliant! :rolleyes:

 

There was also a hag-like crone for the ememy (Zelda?) and I seem to remember a villainous teddy bear. You see teddy bears are supposed to be good. But this one was evil. Brilliant! :rolleyes:

 

Thank God it's Captain Scarlet they've decided to revive in recent times!

 

I'm pretty sure it was Saturday mornings, but of course you've got me wondering now! Does anyone else remember?

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