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jondah63

Bill Bryson style travel books?

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Hello, jondah63, and welcome to BGO. Why not tell us more about yourself on the "Please Introduce Yourself" thread?

 

I suggest you have a rummage around in the Travel section of the Forum, where you should find some recommendations for books in a similar vein.

 

As for my own preferences when it comes to humourous travel writing, I like Pete McCarthy, Dave Gorman and the entirely unrelated to each other Peter Moore and Tim Moore.

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In the humourous travel category Tony Hawks - Round Ireland With A Fridge is laugh out loud. His other books are in a similar vein and well worth a read.

 

As already suggested by Grammath the Pete McCarthy books are also good.

 

Bill Bryson was asked by the Folio Society for his favourite travel book. He said it was In Trouble Again by Redmond O'Hanlon. I tried to read this but couldn't finish it. Did not find it funny at all, and yet the humour was one of the things Bryson liked about it.

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I second Tony Hawks, and Dave Gorman's "America Unchained".

 

I also like Will Ferguson. "Beauty Tips from Moose Jaw" and "Why I Hate Canadians" are very Bryson-esque (Ferguson is Canadian, so the second one is affectionate and tongue-in-cheek, not a massive ranty insult to Canada!). "Hokkaido Highway Blues" is also good, although, personally, I enjoyed it less because I have never spent time in Japan as I have in Canada, and I like to read about places I know or am going to.

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I'm going backpacking this summer and would appreciate some fun travel reading to get me in the mood. I'm going to Italy and Greece, and I love Bill Bryson, so any books about those places written in his style would be perfect.

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Hello, SunnyD, and welcome to BGO.

 

I have merged your request with another, similar one from several years ago, please see a few responses above to give you some pointers.

 

I hope you will come back to the site and tell us what you thought about the books you chose once you've read them.

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Hi SunnyD, welcome to BGO.

 

Like yourself I am a fan of Bill Bryson's scribblings (although not all of them).  As others have offered, I have also enjoyed Tony Hawks, although my recollection of his books is that they tend to revolve more around some outrageous challenge he has either been set, or has set himself, rather than an out and out travelogue, but they are funny. I enjoyed "Playing The Moldovans At Tennis", "Round Ireland With A Fridge" and "One Hit Wonderland".

 

Similar for Dave Gorman, where his travels are again linked to a challenge of some sort, but funny nevertheless. Try "Are You Dave Gorman", "Googlewhack" or "America Unchained"

 

Read most of Peter Moore's and enjoyed those a lot.  Wrong Way Home was very good, and for the part of the world you are travelling to I would suggest Vroom With A View, in which he tours around Italy on a Vespa scooter.  That is funny and charming.

 

Another I picked up quite a few years back was by an Aussie called Brian Thacker, called "Rule No.5, No Sex On the Bus", recounting his experiences as a European coach tour leader.  He also has some other books based on travel, all in a humourous vein.

 

Hope this helps.

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Stuart Maconie has carved something of a niche for himself, travelling around Britain and trying to make sense of the similarities and differences.  He has a nice chatty writing style.

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Some of Tim Moore's books are priceless and very funny (not the one about the Eurovision Song Contest though).  French Revolutions, about the Tour de France, and Spanish Steps, the pilgrimage to St Jaques de Compostella, are particularly good.

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