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This little booklet on spaceflight history is selling so well, to my surprise, that I decided it would be the first one that would be available not only in ebook formats ( http://www.xinxii.de/the-forgotten-astronauts-p-350121.html ) but also on paper ( http://www.amazon.co.uk/The-Forgotten-Astronauts-chapter-spaceflight/dp/149597362X/ref=sr_1_2/280-9050416-0862956?ie=UTF8&qid=1392997612&sr=8-2&keywords=The+Forgotten+Astronauts ).

 

 

The Forgotten Astronauts - A rarely told chapter of spaceflight history

Author: Codex Regius

Pages: 44 page(s)
Language: English
Published: Jan. 2014

 

Tragical or tragicomical - the fate of the failed American astronauts

Our shelves contain countless books on the history of space travel, illustrated with colourful images of the moon and names we have frequently read: Alan Shepard, first American in space, John Glenn who orbited earth, Neil Armstrong, first man on the moon, Elliot See …

Wait a minute. Who is Elliot See?

Then we discover that most books on the history of space travel do not mention his name at all. And closer examination reveals more unknown faces on NASA's group photos. Their accounts, told in this book, reveal the darker side of the American moon-landing myth. These men are the Forgotten Astronauts, those who failed and were erased from history - sometimes tragically, sometimes tragicomically - and who were for a long time hushed up about, not to cloud the worship of the heroes of the Space Age.

 

Edited by Romanike
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Just a bit of a question Romanike - was reading your intro and wondered about 'the moon landing myth' - and assuming you are the author of this booklet, are you suggesting that the moon landing was not as it appeared?

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Just a bit of a question Romanike - was reading your intro and wondered about 'the moon landing myth' - and assuming you are the author of this booklet, are you suggesting that the moon landing was not as it appeared?

Just to clarify it seems that the conspiracy theories were simply that and were debunked .

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Just a bit of a question Romanike - was reading your intro and wondered about 'the moon landing myth' - and assuming you are the author of this booklet, are you suggesting that the moon landing was not as it appeared?

 

Uh, no! Not at all! The myth I had in mind is that the moon-landing was accomplished by flawless superheroes, as the astronauts had been promoted in the 1970s. It is this myth that I was debunking a little after I discovered some unfamiliar faces in my collection of spaceflight literature and wondered why hardly any of the 150 books I have on that topic refers to these men. Their fates began to interest me, and the results are presented here. This was originally an article I published in a German pulp-SF magazine (it was reprinted in Switzerland shortly after), and I expanded and translated it as an ebook. Currently this little thing is our prime bestseller, so to speak; my daughter thinks it is because of the title. :wonder:

 

Frankly, I was not aware that my intro might support this association, since the "moon-landing hoax" had never been a topic here anyone took serious at all. I think I should better change the text then.

Edited by Romanike
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  • 1 month later...

The printed issue is selling remarkably well, too. The edition I have ordered for myself from Amazon looked quite convincing to me. The paper is solid, the printing quality agreeable. Can't tell about the long-term sustainability of the binding, of course. I have therefore decided to extend the double ebook/paper supply to several others of my non-fiction titles :

 

http://www.amazon.de/s/ref=ntt_athr_dp_sr_1?_encoding=UTF8&field-author=Codex%20Regius&search-alias=books-de-intl-us&sort=relevancerank

Edited by Romanike
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Only free shipping on orders over $35  and even though it is only AU$4.91 the shipping would overload it and not speed it up, as I think they still bring print in from US.  Just at present with so many paper TBR I didn't want to get more to top up my order as turning to audible. Yes the ebook is here for AU$3.61, but I can't use that medium.

Edited by grasshopper
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I see. Strangely, I can get it for 4 € within two days, since they have set up a printing agency somewhere in Eastern Europe. Time will show whether that will one day be true for the Australian market, too.

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Hi Romanike: Have read your "The Forgotten Astronauts" - interesting how many people were involved in the space program but were never known to the general public. Seemed like a really dangerous adventure with no lack of men wanting to be involved, also test crashes nearer the ground with the daredevils who loved pushing the envelope or simply misjudging. Sounded quite like the ones on the movie "The Right Stuff". As long as there are boundaries to challenge there will be people who are anxious to give it a try.

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  • 1 month later...

Romanike, I received your booklet a while back but only got the chance to read it properly last weekend. Thank you, it was interesting, but also rather sad that there were all those other astronauts unacknowledged for so long. I'm glad you have written about it and I shall pass the booklet around my friends and family. Was intrigued and pleased to learn about the plaque and the little statuette on the moon.

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Thank you! When I discovered those men in a few images I felt they had not been properly treated by history, that is why I dedicated this booklet to them. Even a professional astronomer who is active in current lunar research projects confessed that he had not known about most of them before.

 

Did you notice any spelling or grammar errors? I intend to update the file with a few corrections, so, if you have discovered any others, I would very much like to know about them! Remember, please, that I am not a native speaker, so some Germanisms are inevitable.

Edited by Romanike
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Hi Romanike: Have read your "The Forgotten Astronauts" - interesting how many people were involved in the space program but were never known to the general public. Seemed like a really dangerous adventure with no lack of men wanting to be involved, also test crashes nearer the ground with the daredevils who loved pushing the envelope or simply misjudging. Sounded quite like the ones on the movie "The Right Stuff". As long as there are boundaries to challenge there will be people who are anxious to give it a try.

 

I think the age of space heroes is over, though. Aren't we watching a paradigm shift towards a society which prefers to "play safe" and avoid any risks even if they are calculable? Look at what happened after Fukushima! In "Horseman of Mars" we have argued that any failure of a manned Mars mission would mean the certain end of the entire programme, with the public crying out, "How could you dare to expose people to such hazards?" True, the Mars One programme boasts several tens of thousands of registrations for their one-way ticket, but I doubt that many of the volunteers have any reasonable idea of what it is they are signing up to. Add to it that the Forgotten Astronauts were samples from a very rare species: trained test pilots who were wont to take risks and play with their lifes, and some of them lost the game prematurely. Nowadays, with "normal" scientists and technicians on-board, I doubt that any space agency would dare to expose itself to a public discussion about sending people on a mission with potentially fatal results.

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Romanike, you're probably right about more caution nowadays.  Besides, I imagine the budget for space age investigation is probably really tight even if there are people who still want to keep probing the final frontier.

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OTOH, the calculation presented by above-mentioned astronomer that the USA are wasting the funding of an entire manned Moon landing project in Iraq every week makes me really think that some people in this world are setting wrong priorities.

 

And if I was going to die, I would rather end with a look on Earth from afar than into the front end of some Schiite crackpot's gun.

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  • 2 weeks later...

The continuing good sales inspired me to upload a full-colour edition of this booklet as well, with a different layout and some minor amendments and corrections.

 

In the sands of the Moon, at a place called the Marsh of Decay, there lies an item which should not have been there. It is a tiny figurine, shaped to look like a man, and he is dead. Behind him, a plaque is set in the soil, bearing fourteen names. Some are American, some Russian.
This figurine was called the Fallen Astronaut. The crew of Apollo 15 took it there, without knowledge of their superiors, and they placed it at this site to commemorate their colleagues from two countries whom doom had struck before men landed on the Moon. But there are more names than these, others which are not even mentioned on that plaque, and knowledge of their unhappy fates was lost.
These men are the Forgotten Astronauts, who were chosen to write history, but then history passed over them, sometimes tragically, sometimes tragicomically. Their stories tell a darker chapter of the American moon-landing myth.
It is recounted in this book.



https://www.createspace.com/4814745

BookCoverImage.jpg

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  • 6 months later...

We have improved some of our older titles. The preprints have been imported into InDesign because LibreOffice ultimately did not have the capacity to process our complex formats. Both books now have improved layouts, known typos have been corrected and the image resolution was generally upgraded.

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