Jump to content
Sign in to follow this  
megustaleer

The Adventure of The Speckled Band

Recommended Posts

"The Adventure of the Speckled Band" is one of the 56 short Sherlock Holmes stories written by Scottish author Sir Arthur Conan Doyle. It is the eighth of the twelve stories collected in The Adventures of Sherlock Holmes. It is one of four Sherlock Holmes stories that can be classified as a locked room mystery. The story was first published in Strand Magazine in February 1892, with illustrations by Sidney Paget. It was published under the different title "The Spotted Band" in New York World in August 1905. Doyle later revealed that he thought this was his best Holmes story. (Wikipedia)

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

This is probably my favorite of these stories.  I'm not all the way done, but I think it'll hold on to it's status even after I finish.  I remember reading it for the first time because I was a little scared.  I couldn't figure out the solution and the addition of the baboon and cheetah to the story just made it more hair-raising.  Plus, both Holmes and Watson had moments of fear.  If they were scared, I knew I should be.  I felt sorry for the main character and was glad that the villain got the comeuppance that he did.  It just seemed the perfect story.  It also ended well, much better than some of the other stories, some of which I have found to be frustratingly truncated.    

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

This was possibly the first Sherlock Holmes story I read when i discovered a couple of volumes of The Strand Magazine in a cupboard at home when I was about 11. It has always been my favourite, so I was pleased to see that Doyle thought it was his best Holmes Story.

I'm looking forward to reading it again.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I thoroughly enjoyed this story.  Certainly one of the best so far although I still think that The Scandal in Bohemia is my favourite.  I felt that this story was unlike any of the others and certainly bought new ideas forward.  I did not guess the end of this one which was also a bonus as although I do not think that a surprise at the end is necessary for my enjoyment of a story it did add to my enjoyment.  I liked the victim and thoroughly disliked the villain which is also good.  As stated on a previous post I would agree that I also cared that Holmes and Watson were in real danger.  I am not surprised that it seems to be one of Conan Doyle's more popular stories.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Anyone else find this story brings to mind Edgar Allan Poe's  Murder on the Rue Morgue?

Must confess not to have read "Murder on the Rue Morgue" yet Meg, but do agree that this is a real humdinger of a story. Full of very exciting characters on two legs, four legs, and no legs at all! I can see why it is so popular.  As Binker pointed out, this story has time to reach its conclusion without the shortcuts of some of the previous ones, and that adds to the satisfaction. All in all an excellent tale.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I enjoyed this story - it was a bit more involved with a really evil man which led to more suspense. Had no idea that another exotic animal would be added to the mix. More danger to Holmes and Watson in this one and a narrow escape for Miss Stoner from Dr. Roylott's dastardly plan. Only three more to go before the book is due back at the library.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I enjoyed this story - it was a bit more involved with a really evil man which led to more suspense. Had no idea that another exotic animal would be added to the mix. More danger to Holmes and Watson in this one and a narrow escape for Miss Stoner from Dr. Roylott's dastardly plan. Only three more to go before the book is due back at the library.

RG and I have recently watched the Jeremy Brett episode of this story and thoroughly enjoyed it. It really is portrayed in a very sinister fashion. As RG has not been reading the stories I have been interested to see his reactions to the TV series. He really did seem to be drawn into this story which seems to suggest that the writing style and imagination of CD holds the test of time

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Great story, probably my favourite so far, for lots of the reasons already mentioned. Yet another conundrum for Victorian women and their forced dependance!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Great story, probably my favourite so far, for lots of the reasons already mentioned. Yet another conundrum for Victorian women and their forced dependance!

Yes Conan Doyle does seem to like basing stories around the lack of independence available to women of the time.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Just finished this and enjoyed it. As comments above the story felt as though it had come to it's own conclusion and not brought to an abrupt end. Having seen the Jeremy Brett episode I knew what was going to happen but enjoyed the story none-the-less.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
Sign in to follow this  

  • Similar Content

    • By canongatebooks
      Hello! The next book up for grabs is The Complete Brigadier Gerard, a rousing tale of heroism and gallantry (tongue firmly in cheek) from the author of the Sherlock Holmes mysteries, Arthur Conan Doyle:



      Mon Dieu! The extraordinary, sabre-rattling adventures of Gerard, a young French cavalry officer in the time of the Napoleonic wars, introduce a hero who will be adored by fans of Flashman and Sherlock Holmes alike. Gathered here in one edition are both volumes of Conan Doyle's much loved tales, which will delight modern readers with their absurdist humour, infectious warmth and swash-buckling energy.

      We've got ten copies to give away to BGO subscribers who are based in UK/Europe. Please claim your copy by (1) posting a reply in this thread and (2) sending me a PM. The giveaway closes 27 June 2010!
    • By Adrian
      This is for people who have read just the first few chapters. If you haven't yet, reading the following will be a spoiler.





      I watched the R&J review and have bought the book. So far I'm maybe a dozen pages into it.

      I'm not loving the double first-person narrative. It reminds me of Kevin Sampson's Outlaws, where the same story is told from multiple viewpoints. I find it just detracts from the story, and makes the book feel a bit gimmicky. Maybe it'll grow on me as I read more, and it certainly won't stop me reading it.

      Secondly, I'm not yet buying into this "Chrono-Displacement Disorder" plot device. It's too Sci-Fi for my liking, and just too "handy" for the author: "I need to have the guy time travel, so here's how I've made it happen." I'm hoping it's resolved later on. If it's a premise I have to swallow just so the book could be written I'll be disappointed.

      As you might have guessed, I'm not wholly convinced just yet.

      What's your first impressions of the book?
    • By Adrian
      I'm about halfway through (he's spending Christmas with her family and has just found out her Mum's a manic depressive - and after reading this book, love, so am I), and unless I get I get some positive feedback here, I'm giving up.

      I posted my first impressions earlier, and I'm afraid it's getting worse.

      Firstly it didn't grab me from the start and I read other books inbetween - always a bad sign. Still, I vowed to stick with it, and once I got past the awkward narrative structure it improved. The enforced double-narrative seemed a little contrived, and I felt whenever the authour switched voices in mid-scene Niffenegger was really forcing the change of voice to make it obvious it was now the other person narrating. Seemed a bit like Kevin Samson writing in Outlaws, where each narrator gets his own unique voice.

      Secondly, the basic premise of the novel, time travel, is mishandled and cack-handedly written. Two versions of himself in the same time frame? (Believe me ladies, if we could do that to ourselves the human race would be extinct). Some evolutionary mishap in the human genome being allowed to rewrite the laws of physics? Those I could live with, but TTW is just an affront to basic common sense. I keep asking myself questions instead of losing myself in the book. Why just appear now? Why just disappear now? More important is the where? How does he go to a particular place as well a particular time?

      Also, the nastiness of the bloke: "I can't help myself so I can do whatever I like." Beat people up? Sure! Rob and steal? Why not! Buy stocks cheap? Who wouldn't! Run naked through the neighbourhood? Well, I tried this, and the police would just not believe my story!

      Most importantly, I don't care about the love story. So he loves her and they love each other, and so forth. I find both of them so insufferable that I don't care about their relationship(s).

      I'm half-heartedly interested in the secondary goings on. I like Kimy, and I like Clare's room-mate, but can't stand the room-mate's boyfriend.

      My current thinking is, "This is not a book to tossed away lightly. It is to hurled with great force."

      I'd like either an incentive to finish it (bearing in mind I have a long list of others waiting on my TBR pile) or, preferably, a precis of the ending. I'm guessing she dies of some disease he can't prevent, and he knows it (of course he knows it, he just can't get involved in any ethical situation that would ruin the house-of-cards plot), but doesn't tell her.

      God, I hate them both. Hey Audrey, try going back in time before Stephen Fry wrote Making History.
    • By Mad Dog & Glory
      Having finally finished The Time Traveler's Wife last night (yes, I know, I'm a bit behind), I was left feeling a little dissatisfied. I loved it for around 200 pages, but then I thought it tailed off badly and left a lot of unanswered questions. Not only the time travel - I had no problems with suspending disbelief, although the most unbelievable part was that they were allowed to lead a 'normal' life, rather than Henry being captured and studied by the US government.

      It's the so-called 'normal' life that concerns me. It seems incredible that I could read a 500+ page novel centring almost exclusively on two characters, and at the end not really have much of an idea of each other's personalities or how they went about their daily lives. At one point, Henry buys a lottery ticket knowing the result and wins several million dollars, so Clare can have a studio. No other mention is made of this. So are they millionaires? They seem to live in normal-sized house, in a normal street. So what do they do with themselves when Henry isn't time travelling? They're not watching TV, as Henry can't. They can't spend all of their time in bed.

      The other huge problem with the novel is lack of conflict, which is essential to all drama. Henry and Clare have this 'perfect' relationship, and are only unhappy with each other over the miscarriages. There were all sorts of potential themes and conflicts that Niffenegger shied away from. Why does Clare never question the fact that this man came into her life at the age of 5 and, as they say, ruined her for other men?
      Niffenegger seems so intent on making this the perfect love story that she misses a lot of tricks.

      My guess is that Audrey Niffenegger will be a one-hit wonder. She came up with a brilliant idea, and also came up with a good structure (although some disagree), and played out every permutation of time travelling possible. But in the end a great idea can get you only so far, and I don't feel she has the skills as a novelist to get as much out of the story as was potentially there.
×