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lunababymoonchild

Dracula, book, TV series

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Here's an idea - not necessarily a good one - for those of us lucky enough to have access to Sky TV, Sky Living is broadcasting a series called Dracula starting on All Hallow's Eve (31 October). I have not read the book and wondered if anybody would like to join me in a 'flash' group read of the novel in time for the start of the series?

Edited by lunababymoonchild

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I'd be glad to - I think I've read it before when I was in highschool, but don't have Sky TV so wouldn't be able to discuss the book vs the series.  

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I'd be glad to - I think I've read it before when I was in highschool, but don't have Sky TV so wouldn't be able to discuss the book vs the series.  

 

In that case we can discuss the book.  It might be online in some sort of catch up thingy (for want of a better expression!) but just the book is fine.  We'll need to be fast!

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Just got my copy on Kindle - will get started on it this evening. Good suggestion Luna.

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Have been reading Dracula for the past couple of hours and the creepiness is getting to me. So I think I'll leave it until tomorrow (and daylight) to continue. Am downstairs by myself as h has gone to bed - it's amazing how much horror can be generated just by suggestion - hope I can sleep o.k. (I wonder what that creaking is that I heard coming from the basement!!! :)

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Great idea,  Luna, no TV series but will re- listen to audio book as much as I can. I think this is the best vamp story of all - soooooooooooo evil :yikes:

Great stuff, Grasshopper

 

Have been reading Dracula for the past couple of hours and the creepiness is getting to me. So I think I'll leave it until tomorrow (and daylight) to continue. Am downstairs by myself as h has gone to bed - it's amazing how much horror can be generated just by suggestion - hope I can sleep o.k. (I wonder what that creaking is that I heard coming from the basement!!! :)

Yes, my father suggested reading only in the daylight and during the summer months! I'll get started this morning, when the sun eventually comes up and see how I get on.

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Yes, best to wait until the vampires are safely encased in their coffins!   :)

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I'm on chapter three! Nothing scary yet.

 

 

Not even a hint of the evil that is lurking?   

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Have finished Dracula (11:30 p.m.) - quite an adventure.  Will wait until others have finished for discussion.  Bram Stoker's writing is very readable and I guess the word I'm looking for is gentlemanly, very Victorian.   :)

Edited by momac

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I am rather behind but enjoying this enormously, I love the literary style but I want to kick that silly young man who wouldn't even get anyone to tell him what the lady with the crucifix was trying to say :banghead:   Have got to Whitstable and like the crusty old man on the seat and his conversations with Mina. 

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I'm quite a bit further on than that and still enjoying it enormously. It doesn't feel like horror to me though but I'm sure that if I was experiencing it it would be horrific.

 

I have read The Historian which is about vampires and the first two in Anne Rice's series about vampires (The Vampire Chronicles) - Interview with the Vampire and The Vampire Lestat - which I loved. I have the third, Queen of the Damned, to look forward to. All very different styles to Stoker's and just as fascinating.

 

I also love the quaintness of the Victorian novels, the manners are different and there's no tech. I also love the concept of sending wires and writing letters, travelling by horse and carriage or train and am much intrigued by the diary style of the prose of Dracula. Two chapters a day, however is more than enough for me so I'm glad that that's enough to finish the book before the TV series, not that that's really important.

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Last 67 pages to go and I find myself so involved with the book that I've decided who I want to play Dracula in the film of the book that I'm going to make.

I guess it won't be one of the current hunks. :)

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I guess it won't be one of the current hunks. :)

Nicely put, Momac. I decided on Peter Capaldi, a Glaswegian actor of much experience. I'll put a link in later Edited by lunababymoonchild

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Nicely put, Momac. I decided on Peter Capaldi, a Glaswegian actor of much experience. I'll put a link in later

 

Will look forward to the production.  :)

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Will look forward to the production.   :)

 

 

It will, of course, be spectacular ;)

 

Here is a link to Peter Capaldi (just on the off-chance that you've never heard of him)  : Peter Capaldi

 

There are various sites claiming to have his height so I'm not sure but he looks tall and I decided that Dracula would need to be tall, and bony.  And I'm sure that you can easily see his aquiline nose.  He has also been chosen as the next Doctor Who so not at the forefront of my mind then   :P 

 

As for Professor Van Helsing, I thought Robert Carlyle  :  Robert Carlyle

 

Another Glaswegian - I can't help it we're just so talented!  He'd have to age around 20 years and put on a german-like accent, but a man of his talent could do it.  He's not tall so would suit my vision of Van Helsing.  He is a fabulous actor and I'm not just saying that because he's Glaswegian.

 

I haven't cast the rest yet but I daresay I'l get there.

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:) 

It will, of course, be spectacular ;)

 

Here is a link to Peter Capaldi (just on the off-chance that you've never heard of him)  : Peter Capaldi

 

As for Professor Van Helsing, I thought Robert Carlyle  :  Robert Carlyle

 

I haven't cast the rest yet but I daresay I'l get there.

Love the idea luna, keep going - who on this site is going to dare argue with Glaswegians?

 

Of course we've heard of Peter Capaldi, if only lately, as he's the NEW Dr Who - do you think he could be evil enough? Need someone like the late Ian Richardson, do you remember the brilliant British version of House of Cards?

Like your van Helsing though must admit I'd never heard of him before. Please keep us updated as to the start of the UK TV series.

 

OK, so I've got as far as Mina nursing the amnesiac Jonathan and also finding the Renfield episodes suitably ghastly. Do start discussing with Momac if you want, I have read it before so you will not be spoiling. :)

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    • By grasshopper
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    • By David
      Restored Thread
       
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      #2 18th November 2006, 11:27 AM
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      #3 18th November 2006, 07:39 PM
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