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Jeremy DEagle

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My colleague, not a teacher, spoke to a teacher and called him by his first name to which he made a flippant comment making it clear that he should be referred to as Mr X rather than his first name. This was in a private conversation, not a classroom full of pupils. 2 adults in the same workplace and because one is a teacher he demands the formality. Some people need to get a grip of themselves.

 

Some pupils call me by my first name, I don't get bent out of shape about it. Respect is earned not demanded.

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We are currently looking round secondary schools for my daughter. There are two schools up for grabs really and they are both really good schools and I wouldn't have any concerns whichever one she ended up at.

 

However, I was wondering if there is anywhere online that we can look at the kind of jobs she'd be interested in doing in the future and seeing based on that what kind of things to study to line her up best for those as the two schools seem to have different areas in which they specialise and we could perhaps use that to decide on the best one?

*Cough*

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We are currently looking round secondary schools for my daughter. There are two schools up for grabs really and they are both really good schools and I wouldn't have any concerns whichever one she ended up at.

 

Over here it is usual for secondary  schools to have Open Days where the child can go and see around with their parents, or if they have missed that to make an appointment and have a look around together.  If academic offerings are equally  acceptable then they can  decide together which one the child is most comfortable with and which the child finds most welcoming.  . 

Edited by grasshopper

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We are currently looking round secondary schools for my daughter. There are two schools up for grabs really and they are both really good schools and I wouldn't have any concerns whichever one she ended up at.

 

However, I was wondering if there is anywhere online that we can look at the kind of jobs she'd be interested in doing in the future and seeing based on that what kind of things to study to line her up best for those as the two schools seem to have different areas in which they specialise and we could perhaps use that to decide on the best one?

Of hand I don't know about online sites for this purpose JdE, but when our sons were in this position I found a book that listed career titles and the subjects required to achieve that end.  It was useful because my youngest wanted to be an architect and we discovered he needed Art as an essential rather than Technical Drawing, which was what we assumed he needed.  He was not good at art so turned his mind to something else - Economics! I don't have the book now so cannot quote the exact title but it was something like "What does your child want to be".  Hope that's of help.

 

Edit:  Having just browsed Amazon I find that there is a book entitled Career Choices: for teens and young adults, which may help.

Edited by Barblue

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I didn't have to make any subject choices until the start of the 4th form, for 'O' levels.  In the two years prior to that we had some "careers" consultation where the requirements for particular jobs or pre-requisites for university entrance were outlined.

 

It wasn't even thought about when I selected which secondary school I wanted to attend, should I pass the 12 plus.  I guess things must have changed a lot.  Actually, before I started secondary school my parents still believed that their sons would leave school and get a job at 16 like they did.  'A' levels and university were definitely not in their thought process!

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I didn't have to make any subject choices until the start of the 4th form, for 'O' levels. 

 

Same here, which is a very good thing, because at age eleven I was definitely planning to go to Harwell and be an atomic scientist.  I soon realised I had neither the ability or the desire.  

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Does anyone have a recommendation for a book or books on Roman England - ones that are readable, not just historical dates? History teacher in high school would just parade a bunch of dates and history was forty minutes of boredom - I know there must have been teachers who could make history come alive but this teacher didn't.

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Hope you'll pardon my next question as it is something that puzzles me.  Readers mention symbolism in books they read and I wonder if the symbolism is sometimes in the reader's mind rather than that of the author - maybe the author has no intention of dropping a mystical hint that what they are writing is really about something else.  It seems it usually applies to 'good' books where a reviewer is explaining at length what the author really meant.  Something like modern art where people gather around and 'explain' what the artist is trying to portray.  Am I missing something?   :thinking:

Edited by momac

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I would definitely say that symbolism is in the mind of the beholder Momac. Unless the author explicitly states what their intentions are we can never really be certain, pedants and critics be damned. For me that is one of the great things about books, in fact about art in general; it can have deep and personal meanings for the author and each of the readers, and none of them be the same thing! It all depends on how each mind works and how many levels you wish to perceive it on.

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I would definitely say that symbolism is in the mind of the beholder Momac. Unless the author explicitly states what their intentions are we can never really be certain, pedants and critics be damned. For me that is one of the great things about books, in fact about art in general; it can have deep and personal meanings for the author and each of the readers, and none of them be the same thing! It all depends on how each mind works and how many levels you wish to perceive it on.

 

This is true, although in my day it seemed like school syllabuses wanted students all to see the same symbolism in the novels they taught. 

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Hope you'll pardon my next question as it is something that puzzles me.  Readers mention symbolism in books they read and I wonder if the symbolism is sometimes in the reader's mind rather than that of the author - maybe the author has no intention of dropping a mystical hint that what they are writing is really about something else.  It seems it usually applies to 'good' books where a reviewer is explaining at length what the author really meant.  Something like modern art where people gather around and 'explain' what the artist is trying to portray.  Am I missing something?   :thinking:

Once upon a time I discovered the word "chiaroscuro" and liked it so much I wrote a very short story about a person walking through a landscape of shadows and staircases and cats. Bad things happen to a cat.  I had no idea what it was all about!  Anyway, "Chiaroscuro" was published in a national writers' magazine and the editor wrote a three page discourse on the symbolism.  :huh:  I had no idea I was so clever.  :D

 

... in my day it seemed like school syllabuses wanted students all to see the same symbolism in the novels they taught. 

Yeah ... reminds me of when I got into trouble at uni.  In a class about the symbolism of Robert Frost, I suggested that maybe Robert Frost really did like writing about woodlands and pathways. It didn't go down very well.

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Once upon a time I discovered the word "chiaroscuro" and liked it so much I wrote a very short story about a person walking through a landscape of shadows and staircases and cats. Bad things happen to a cat.  I had no idea what it was all about!  Anyway, "Chiaroscuro" was published in a national writers' magazine and the editor wrote a three page discourse on the symbolism.  :huh:  I had no idea I was so clever.  :D

 

Yeah ... reminds me of when I got into trouble at uni.  In a class about the symbolism of Robert Frost, I suggested that maybe Robert Frost really did like writing about woodlands and pathways. It didn't go down very well.

That made me laugh!

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Once upon a time I discovered the word "chiaroscuro" and liked it so much I wrote a very short story about a person walking through a landscape of shadows and staircases and cats. Bad things happen to a cat.  I had no idea what it was all about!  Anyway, "Chiaroscuro" was published in a national writers' magazine and the editor wrote a three page discourse on the symbolism.  :huh:  I had no idea I was so clever.  :D

 

Yeah ... reminds me of when I got into trouble at uni.  In a class about the symbolism of Robert Frost, I suggested that maybe Robert Frost really did like writing about woodlands and pathways. It didn't go down very well.

 

 

Isn't is great when other people tell you what you really were saying!   :)

 

I have a book of Robert Frost poems and have read a lot of them with pleasure just imagining the landscape and circumstances, never once did I stop to ponder what he really might be trying to say.  I do remember one incident in a spy film where Donald Pleasance was a 'sleeper' agent and the words 'miles to go before I sleep' were the code words which triggered his 'awakening' as a spy.  Which is a bit off topic but just popped into my mind about Robert Frost.

Edited by momac

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Does anyone have a recommendation for a book or books on Roman England - ones that are readable, not just historical dates? History teacher in high school would just parade a bunch of dates and history was forty minutes of boredom - I know there must have been teachers who could make history come alive but this teacher didn't.

Assuming you are looking for novels on the subject, one book I particularly liked, momac, was Cast Not The Day by Paul Waters.  This Roman England is around 300AD.  There is an Authors Note that is at the end of the book but I've always thought it ought to be at the beginning. 

 

I'm sure I've read other authors on this subject but at the moment their name(s) escape me.   

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Assuming you are looking for novels on the subject, one book I particularly liked, momac, was Cast Not The Day by Paul Waters.  This Roman England is around 300AD.  There is an Authors Note that is at the end of the book but I've always thought it ought to be at the beginning. 

 

I'm sure I've read other authors on this subject but at the moment their name(s) escape me.

 

Thanks BB - sounds just like what I'm looking for.:)

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Thanks BB - sounds just like what I'm looking for. :)

BB - got the book on Kindle and when I was looking around Kindle e-books found 'a newly discovered novel'  The Eternal Wonder, by Pearl S. Buck - I loved her writing so I now have two more interesting books to look forward to.  :)

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Rosemary Sutcliffe wrote a series for children set in Roman Britain, the first and most famous being The Eagle of The Ninth. The review linked to was prompted by the release in 2011 of the film The Eagle, which is based on the book.

That would probably be a nice & easy introduction to the subject

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Rosemary Sutcliffe wrote a series for children set in Roman Britain, the first and most famous being The Eagle of The Ninth. The review linked to was prompted by the release in 2011 of the film The Eagle, which is based on the book.

That would probably be a nice & easy introduction to the subject

 

 

Thanks Meg, will have a look for that one too.  

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This may be something many people know but I don't - if Homer's Odyssey was originally pieced together from various scrolls in the Greek language why is it that the English translation rhymes? My apologies if this is a really dumb question.

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I think it is very common for translated poems to be revised (reworded) to ensure they remain poems. That includes both metre and rhyme. Which I guess means they are not exact literal translations. But then again prose has to be adjusted by the translator to make it work and not seem stilted. Poetry translation is just more "adapted".

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I appreciate that this website is sponsored by Amazon and have always found their service excellent and I want to support BGO. Sadly, for the last few years Amazon  book delivery charges to Australia of ( pounds sterling ) 5.49 basic  plus 2.99 per item is very high and often more than the cost of the  book , which makes it useless for me as it is then cheaper here, where books are comparatively expensive.   There is another international book supplier based in Gloucestershire  which does world wide delivery free and is equally prompt and efficient.

 

Is there anyone on the Forum who is in the industry, so-to-speak, and can suggest why Amazon can't do the same at least for books? Or do I have to ask Amazon?

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I appreciate that this website is sponsored by Amazon and have always found their service excellent and I want to support BGO. Sadly, for the last few years Amazon book delivery charges to Australia of ( pounds sterling ) 5.49 basic plus 2.99 per item is very high and often more than the cost of the book , which makes it useless for me as it is then cheaper here, where books are comparatively expensive. There is another international book supplier based in Gloucestershire which does world wide delivery free and is equally prompt and efficient.

 

Is there anyone on the Forum who is in the industry, so-to-speak, and can suggest why Amazon can't do the same at least for books? Or do I have to ask Amazon?

Amazon seem to have an Australian site : http://www.amazon.com.au, if that's any help and Binker managed to get a deal with Amazon US for our American members, as far as I recall. Edited by lunababymoonchild

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 Binker managed to get a deal with Amazon US for our American members, as far as I recall.

Binker set up, and manages, a similar arrangement with Amazon.com as we have with Amazon.uk  for a 'commission' for BGO on every Amazon purchase made via the BGO link.

This does not give any advantage to members when it comes to postage costs

 

Grasshopper, I'm afraid it would probably take some serious lobbying by Aussie readers to get Amazon.au to change its policy on postage.

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I'm having a tidy up, and I wondered: what do BGOers do to identify all those cables we all have for various devices?

 

I have a new sideboard, and I now have a drawer full of cables. I tend to tie them up loosely so they don't get tangled up, but I can really only figure out their function by looking at the connections, and I often find these hard to identify. If there's a plug, I often put on a sticky label, but what can you do to identify a cable??

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