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Paper books vs. eBooks

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Thank you for those comments,  MrHG, it is encouraging  to hear from a someone who clearly uses his Paperwhite a great deal.    I did not know about the illuminated screen  or the ability to swap between kindle and phone all of which would be most useful .  It sounds as though it would provide all my basic reading needs well. Getting tempted again.

 

I just wanted to make it clear that if you have a smartphone - and I'm not asking because it's none of my business - you can download the Kindle app for it without buying a Kindle e-reader.

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Thank goodness I have the original Kindle, it is not one of the ones that the article says can cause sleep disturbance. :rolleyes:

Me too. Although I would like the some of the features of a newer Kindle; a lit screen isn't one of them.

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I can see why you wouldn't want to upgrade your Kindle, tag. I got through two of them and when I broke the screen on the latter, Amazon were unable to replace it with an exact replica, so I opted to get a Paperwhite. I actually find it less intuitive than my original Kindle, and I make little use of the option to read in a darkened room.  

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The screens are the most vulnerable bit, Luna, and if significant pressure is applied to them they will crack. I trod on my first one whilst wearing shoes, but then I am not a very light chap.  

 

A lot of people buy cases for them;  I had a case for my Kindle keyboard with a built in light which ran off the Kindle's battery. The screen on the Paperwhite means the external light source isn't necessary, however.  

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Thank goodness I have the original Kindle, it is not one of the ones that the article says can cause sleep disturbance. :rolleyes:

 

The implication in the article is that later Kindles use back lighting, and are thus likely to cause sleep problems.  The fact is that they don't use back lighting: the lighting is in front of the screen, and is thus reflected off the screen to the eyes, just like light from the original Kindles and paper books. There are e-readers that use back lighting, but the Kindle is not one of them, and will thus, shouldn't affect sleep in the way described. 

 

When you dig into the paper itself, the actual reading devices used were:

iPad

iPad2

iPod Touch

iPhone

Kindle

Kindle Fire

Nook Color

paper book

 

Of these, the Kindle and book were listed as non-light emitters.

 

So, what is actually being tested here, aside from the Kindle and the book, are not lit e-ink readers, like the Kindle Paperwhite, but a range of devices all relying on backlit LCD displays, only one of which is advertised as an e-reader (the Nook Color)  A very different proposition to that described in the article.

 

In addition, I understand (but haven't been able to access the meat of the article) that the sample size tested was 12; a bit low (understatement)!  All in all, this cannot be described as conclusive.  Nor can the article be described as accurate reporting!

 

I used to have a Kindle 3 (keyboard), and changed to a Paperwhite last year, mainly because I wanted the lit screen (bedside light disturbing sleeping partner!).  I'm really pleased - the Paperwhite is a much easier read: lighter, easier to handle, greater range of fonts (the serifed fonts are far better than those on the 3), all round better experience.  As a result, as much as I adore paper books (and have a collection to prove it!), I find myself reading my Kindle more and more.

Edited by willoyd

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Hello willoyd and welcome - you know a lot about Kindles. I'm really satisfied with my plain Kindle and since I don't read in bed the Kindle I have works just fine for me. The weight of it is easy on my wrist and I hardly ever read paper books any more. Buying this little device has added a lot to my reading pleasure. Hope to meet up with you again on the forum. :)

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Thank you for all the earlier comments when I was considering a Kindle. They were all helpful and I finally went ahead and now have a Paperwhite. I am very pleased with it and found it easy to use. It is still heavier than I expected, but much easier than a book and excellent for reading in bed. I also appreciate the ability to change typeface and size of print.  The surface is not as smooth for swiping as the phone and I understand better the warnings about  how it could get broken.

 

It is very useful now as I can  easily replace all my printed classics, as they are so cheap on Kindle and leave more space at home, also not buy many printed books any more. I still love print books but ease of use and storage space now means they must be limited.

 

Once I stop trying to go back  by pressing the lower right hand corner like the phone and remember where Home and  < is I'll be fine.  I do have one problem and have been all through the Settings and looked elsewhere but cannot turn off the dictionary. Whenever I go to turn to next page and accidentally press where there is a word this great box of explanation pops up and I have to delete it and turn again.  Any advice on stopping that would be appreciated.

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My Kindle keyboard has died. Some software/firmware fault means it will only do two pages turns before freezing. The last time I had yo remove the battery to unfreeze and it still went wrong. So I've bought a 7th edition Kindle. No frills, mo back/front light, no clever buttons, etc. But an improvement on my old Kindle. The screen resolution means I can use a smaller font

And £59 was nice and affordable.

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I have just heard an argument on TV that I haven't thought about yet. Your children may inherit your library of paper books but not your ebooks. It's excluded by the terms of use. Ironically, your kids will legitimately inherit the hardware: your readers, tablets and other devices. But all the legally downloaded content on them will become illegal by the moment you pass away. There is no legal stipulation yet of what shall happen to it, so, by all likelihood, Amazon and consorts will just be happy to wipe out the collection of your life next time your kids go online with their digital heirloom.

 

Ray Bradbury, are you still there? What about writing an update of "Fahrenheit 451"? 

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I have just heard an argument on TV that I haven't thought about yet. Your children may inherit your library of paper books but not your ebooks. It's excluded by the terms of use. Ironically, your kids will legitimately inherit the hardware: your readers, tablets and other devices. But all the legally downloaded content on them will become illegal by the moment you pass away. There is no legal stipulation yet of what shall happen to it, so, by all likelihood, Amazon and consorts will just be happy to wipe out the collection of your life next time your kids go online with their digital heirloom.

 

Ray Bradbury, are you still there? What about writing an update of "Fahrenheit 451"? 

 

You are technically correct but Amazon and other suppliers of digital media do not know whether account holders are alive or dead. The basic rule is that any device must have a single account associated with it - although one account may be used on multiple devices. Provided the family members have access to passwords and any other log-in details, they can access the accounts of their dead relatives almost indefinitely - at least as long as the digital provider continues to exist. 

 

But the basic point is that digital supply has turned a product such as a novel away from being a physical artefact and made it into a licence. Hence, multiple copies but not transferable and liable to be withdrawn if the provider ceases to trade. In a way, it is much more in line with the theory of copyright where every individual who accesses a product should pay a royalty for doing so. Maybe the next logical step would be to pay a royalty for each occasion a product is accessed?

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But the basic point is that digital supply has turned a product such as a novel away from being a physical artefact and made it into a licence. Hence, multiple copies but not transferable and liable to be withdrawn if the provider ceases to trade. In a way, it is much more in line with the theory of copyright where every individual who accesses a product should pay a royalty for doing so. Maybe the next logical step would be to pay a royalty for each occasion a product is accessed?

 

Food for thought.

Digital copyright laws are so outdated.

I think this is a line drawn between Corporations and laws of Nations.

Close fight :)

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The digital copyright laws will have to adapt. But I wonder whether repeat licensing is the way. It is an interesting concept.

 

In the meantime, I will continue to remove the DRM from my purchased ebooks and then back-up the DRM free copy.

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What did you just say Tag and how do you remove the DRM (do not remove?) - are you saying that no one can get your e-book away from you?

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Oh, it's very easy. That's why it's illegal.

Oh dear!

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Oh, it's very easy. That's why it's illegal.

Well...

 

In the UK.

"The personal copying exception" [to copyright law] "permits you to make copies of media (CDs, ebooks etc) you have bought, for private purposes such as format shifting or backup without infringing copyright. For example the exception would allow you to copy content that you have bought on a CD onto your MP3 player, provided it is for your own private use.

"You are permitted to make personal copies to any device that you own, or a personal online storage medium, such as a private cloud. However, it is unlawful to give other people access to the copies you have made, including, for example, by allowing a friend to access your personal cloud storage."

 

But you are not allowed to circumvent DRM...

"EU and UK law protects the right of copyright owners and creators to use Technological Protection Measures (TPMs) (also known as copy protection measures or DRM) to protect their copyright works, for example, through encryption on DVDs. TPMs can have a key role in enabling copyright owners (rightsholders) to offer content to consumers in different ways, as well as protecting against unlawful copying (piracy). Although TPMs have a vital role to play, their use could potentially prevent activities that are permitted by copyright exceptions.  In most cases, the Government would expect the user to try to negotiate a solution with the copyright owner before seeking assistance from Government."

 

In other words you are allowed to make a back-up, you are not allowed to circumvent DRM, the copyright owner is supposed to work with you to enable you to make a copy... I'm sure Amazon, Apple, etc. will argue that keeping copies stored on the cloud on your behalf (which can be downloaded numerous times) satisfies the requirement for a back-up solution but it wouldn't satisfy the format shifting where I might want to move a Kindle ebook to a Kobo or Nook e-reader.

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As the author I think that ebooks are better, you can correct and reload it anytime you'd like.

Yes, I like the fact that Amazon will update my copy when changes are made.  I guess I should be worried that this could allow for editing or even censorship of content.

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Just an observation about e-books or maybe books that haven't been thoroughly edited - I've noticed on a few occasions that the author has used a cliche or jargon that is not applicable to the time period. For instance, a book where events are happening in the 1940's has someone referring to a person who is not too bright as 'not being the sharpest knife in the drawer', it just jumped off the page at me. I've seen this happen a few times and it's amazing how jarring it is. It was one of the mistakes we were told to avoid in a creative writing class I took - don't use cliches or current popular jargon unless it's how that character would normally speak. It was an interesting class, however, no great novel from me was forthcoming, would rather read than write. :)

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