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Paper books vs. eBooks


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What are you saying Clavain, you prefer paper books to e-books?

 

I have found that if I read a book on Kindle which I think our son may find interesting I end up buying a paperback copy of the book for him, so Amazon does quite well with my purchases.  I find being an impatient person the immediacy of buying for my Kindle is great whereas if I order a paper book I have to wait plus there's the cost of the postage.  The hard backs I can't handle too well because of some arthritis in my hands, so for me it's e-books.

 

Changed my mind :)

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I had a Kindle problem at lunchtime. The book I was reading froze and I got a message telling me to delete it from the device and reload from the cloud. Fortunately I was in the State Library at the time and could use the free wifi to do this, but it would have been mightily annoying if it had happened on a station platform just before my hour's train ride home in the dark.

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  • 2 weeks later...

I have taken the first step towards owning a kindle, this is a huge thing for me, I have resisted for years and swore I would never buy one, but after playing with the one we bought for my son at Christmas my resolve was wilting somewhat.  I have recently (and reluctantly) bought a new phone a touchscreen windows phone when my trusty old Blackberry finally gave up the ghost, and I have downloaded the Kindle App for it, and I have to say, from what I have seen so far I am pretty impressed with it, Not saying I will stop buying books, as I still prefer an actual book to an e reader but I am slowly being converted.

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I am slowly being converted.

Me too, Apple. 

I got a Kindle at Christmas, but mainly used it for bargain buys, embarrassing ones that I wouldn't want to be seen reading, like chick-lit stuff, and things which lent themselves to being read in small chunks. It was my emergency handbag reading.

Before I went on holiday, though, I bought some Kindle books which I would probably have normally bought on paper, including Steven Pinker's new one, which is a doorstopper. I wanted to read it but didn't want to carry it.

I have also just bought We Are All Completely Beside Ourselves, which is a "real" book. But it was cheap. I'm not giving up on having real books on paper. I'm not ...

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I almost always read on my tablet these days.  It's easier with a big book.  It allows me to experience instant gratification with books, a state greatly to be desired.  And it's very easy to mark a specific sentence, write a note, etc., which is helpful when writing reviews.

 

I do still buy some actual books.  If I'm travelling, I take a mixture in case I'm somewhere where the light or my charging abilities make it difficult for me to use my tablet.  If I'm going to read something that I think I will want to share with someone else, I often buy it as a book.  This usually means my husband (although he has a tablet, too, he has not adapted to it as well as I have) and, for murder mysteries, my mother and her blood-thirsty friends.  Another category of exceptions is books that are beautiful (Miss Peregrine) or have a lot of photographs (Five Days at Memorial, which I wish I had read in book form).

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  • 2 weeks later...

Here's an interesting article I read in The Daily Telegraph (UK) today that's pertinent to our discussion.  I can't do clever links, so I'll type out the small piece for those without access to said daily newspaper.

 

WHY A PAPERBACK STICKS IN THE MEMORY

Readers of paperback books are more likely to recall the storyline than those who use electronic devices such as a Kindle, a study has suggested.

Researchers gave 50 people a 28-page story to read.  Half read it on a Kindle, and half in paperback form.  Those who had read the ebook found it much harder to remember its events in the right order than those who had read it in paperback.

The team, of Stavanger University, Norway, say that the "tactile feedback" of a Kindle might not support the mental recall of a story in the same way as feeling and smelling a print book would.

 

Obviously this is a very small research sample and, of course, there are so many other reasons why individuals might not find reading from a Kindle comfortable, especially IMO if they had not handled one before.  However, I thought it was an interesting bit of research.  As far as I'm concerned, it's still a matter of 'books are better'.

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Obviously this is a very small research sample and, of course, there are so many other reasons why individuals might not find reading from a Kindle comfortable, especially IMO if they had not handled one before.  However, I thought it was an interesting bit of research.  As far as I'm concerned, it's still a matter of 'books are better'.

 

I remember that the first couple of books I read on Kindle were a struggle. They didn't feel like books and I had trouble with retention. But now I am used to Kindles, I find it just like reading a book, but more convenient.

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Here's an interesting article I read in The Daily Telegraph (UK) today that's pertinent to our discussion.  I can't do clever links, so I'll type out the small piece for those without access to said daily newspaper.

 

WHY A PAPERBACK STICKS IN THE MEMORY

Readers of paperback books are more likely to recall the storyline than those who use electronic devices such as a Kindle, a study has suggested.

Researchers gave 50 people a 28-page story to read.  Half read it on a Kindle, and half in paperback form.  Those who had read the ebook found it much harder to remember its events in the right order than those who had read it in paperback.

The team, of Stavanger University, Norway, say that the "tactile feedback" of a Kindle might not support the mental recall of a story in the same way as feeling and smelling a print book would.

 

Obviously this is a very small research sample and, of course, there are so many other reasons why individuals might not find reading from a Kindle comfortable, especially IMO if they had not handled one before.  However, I thought it was an interesting bit of research.  As far as I'm concerned, it's still a matter of 'books are better'.

That is interesting BB, thanks for posting.
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Here is the link to Barblue's article in the Daily Telegraph : http://www.telegraph.co.uk/culture/books/booknews/11048431/Kindles-inferior-to-paperbacks-for-memorable-stories.html

 

I liked this bit the best : "When you read on paper you can sense with your fingers a pile of pages on the left growing, and shrinking on the right," said Mangen. "Perhaps this somehow aids the reader, providing more fixity and solidity to the reader's sense of unfolding and progress of the text, and hence the story."

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One advantage to me with a paper book is that I can riffle the pages if I quickly want to check back on a bit of information whereas with my ordinary Kindle with no fancy features I have to click away until I reach what I'm looking for, however it's not a big enough inconvenience to prefer paper books. I have, however, pre-ordered Ken Follett's upcoming new book in paper form so that I can pass it along to our son, it completes the trilogy.

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Here is the link to Barblue's article in the Daily Telegraph : http://www.telegraph.co.uk/culture/books/booknews/11048431/Kindles-inferior-to-paperbacks-for-memorable-stories.html

 

I liked this bit the best : "When you read on paper you can sense with your fingers a pile of pages on the left growing, and shrinking on the right," said Mangen. "Perhaps this somehow aids the reader, providing more fixity and solidity to the reader's sense of unfolding and progress of the text, and hence the story."

 

I agree.

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I have recently read quite a lot on the Kindle because it was the summer holidays and I was either away from home or out and about a lot. I have started craving real books, particularly for that feeling of getting somewhere.

I expect this might be different for digital natives, who have grown up with ebooks. But then, everyone starts off with paper books: I can't imagine reading "The Gruffalo" on a Kindle! So maybe generations to come will retain a love for real books.

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I liked this bit the best : "When you read on paper you can sense with your fingers a pile of pages on the left growing, and shrinking on the right," said Mangen. "Perhaps this somehow aids the reader, providing more fixity and solidity to the reader's sense of unfolding and progress of the text, and hence the story."

This I can relate to 100%! The only upside of ebooks that I covet is the ability to cross-reference easily.

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