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Eurovision Song Contest


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Just sat reading with this on as background - with the occasional look at the screen because of Tel's intriguing commentary which penetrated my concentration on my book. Some of the acts are laughable and ridiculous, but if you don't watch the screen some of the music is quite lyrical. As to a winner - well I expect the silliest costume will win again!

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Well, it's over. What did you think? My husband said, maybe we are getting too old for this. Who on earth would have voted for this ridiculous person from the Ukraine who could only utter a couple of words and thought that was international? Must be lots of teens just using up their mobile credit.

There were some nice songs there but what with all those former Soviet Republic and Yugoslavian countries voting for each other, most of the songs didn't stand a chance. If they divided Germany into their 16 states and they would all vote for each other - or the UK into the amount of counties there are - they would win, as well. No wonder they are talking about changing the voting mode.

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I watched most of the voting, I think that`s the best part, made funnier by Terry Wogan`s comments.

It`s the same every year, the same countries vote for each other, we`re billy no mates so no chance for us. However it would be better for our self esteem if we could at least pick a song with some credibility.

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However it would be better for our self esteem if we could at least pick a song with some credibility.
Don't worry, sometimes it's you, sometimes it's the others. (And I still considered your song better than the Ukrainian one - though only slightly. ;)) Germany has had some pretty bad ones in the past. I quite liked this year's entry but it only reached number 19.
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I understand that the reason we don't have to qualify through the semi-final stage is that the BBC (along with its counter-parts in France and Germany) meet the bulk of the funding cost. Could that money not have been better spent on, say, more football coverage or getting Andrew Lloyd Webber a facelift?

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I understand that the reason we don't have to qualify through the semi-final stage is that the BBC (along with its counter-parts in France and Germany) meet the bulk of the funding cost. Could that money not have been better spent on, say, more football coverage or getting Andrew Lloyd Webber a facelift?

:lmao::lmao::lmao: I totally agree MFJ

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I understand that the reason we don't have to qualify through the semi-final stage is that the BBC (along with its counter-parts in France and Germany) meet the bulk of the funding cost. Could that money not have been better spent on, say, more football coverage or getting Andrew Lloyd Webber a facelift?

 

If this is the case, lets pay less and take our chances in the semi-final or maybe not bother at all.

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Could that money not have been better spent on, say, more football coverage ...?

Ah, you're a tease, MFJ! ;)

 

Yes, it was pants, clearly, though unfortunately since over 10 million people tuned in it's likely to be considered a rip-roaring success by the Beeb.

 

I can't describe how embarrassed I was to be associated with our drivellous entry. It was like a plasticised Barbie family possessed by the spirit of Benny Hill. Awful. Dismal. Shameful.

 

I won't go on about the voting system, but really, what's the point?

 

was the singer of the winning group male or female?

I believe there is an official enquiry about that ongoing at the present time...

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My parents in law were with us this weekend and so I was outvoted on watching the Eurovision 3-1 (we watched a Danny Kaye film “The court jester” instead, very good). However, watching it on video afterwards does have the huge advantage that you can skip all the waffle and skip songs once you’ve heard enough (about 30 seconds in most cases). I couldn’t FF through the voting which is the best bit. The voting was outrageous this year - surely it can’t be that difficult to devise a scheme where countries are banned from voting for their nearest neighbours? However, I suppose on the bright side, it’s nice to see people like Croatia, Bosnia, Serbia, Macedonia all voting for each other. It wasn’t that long ago that they were fighting a nasty war against each other. Maybe that’s the solution to world conflict - set up a tacky song contest!

 

On the subject of the contest itself, I don’t think it was anything like as good as last year. Lordi’s song was a great piece of rock even without the costumes; Russia’s effort last year was as good as any boy band in the charts, and who can forget the magnificent work of genius, namely, Lithuania’s “we are the winners of eurovision?”. In contrast, this year I would say that only Hungary’s song (the bluesy number) and maybe Germany’s nice Sinatra-esque effort were in any way memorable.

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Undeniably one of the best bits of the Eurovision is Tel's wickedly disrespectful commentary - it certainly got me chuckling, especially when that dreadful woman doing the backstage interviewing was on.

 

Of course, though, the most salient part was when the anodyne hosts declared the great thing about Eurovision was that it showed how united we all are.

 

"No it doesn't!" Terry declared straight away. And of course, it doesn't. It shows, actually, how Europe works in manifold enclaves and exercises both positive and negative discrimination (e.g. for their close neighbours and against the UK after Iraq). Ultimately it seems to show what folly it would be to attempt to impose any further movement towards a federal-style Europe. Balkan countries couldn't maintain unity; former Soviet countries all went their own way and even here in Britain the old union has been eroded with assemblies to work with the specific interests of each nation. Nationalistic identities are too strong and too diverse to be forced into a common mould. We can all work together, but we have to accept there are differences that mean we can never be one.

 

Anyway, it's all reached Parliament now with a call for reform on voting or withdrawal from the competition. You can read about it here.

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I don't think that something like Eurovision fosters unity as such. However I think it does (at the risk of using 1950s euro-speak) foster understanding. For Serbia to vote for Croatia last year and vice-versa this year must foster some good feeling between these peoples. Similarly there's not much love lost between the governments of Russia and the Ukraine and the latter and Poland have along history of enmity. If their populations come out and vote for each other, they are telling their governments that they don't regard the other countries people as enemies. Football can have a similar effect. Decades of the European cup hasn't brought unity but it has certainly at the very least improved the average person's knowledge of the geography of Europe. Having so many foreign players at English clubs has also helped break down barriers. Remember how Man Utd fans used to sing the Marseilleise to give Cantona a boost?

 

 

In a similar vein, I don't know if anyone noticed Turkey's strange voting pattern - both last year and this year, they gave 12 points to Armenia. Now everyone knows that there is nothing but hatred between Turkey and Armenia over the 1914-16 genocide. Similarly Turkey made a point of giving Greece some points. I think this is very suspicious - I wonder if their votes are being manipulated by the Turkish government to create a favourable impression in EU circles?

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I wonder if their votes are being manipulated by the Turkish government to create a favourable impression in EU circles?

In the article I link to above Malta claims that in several countries the result was not based solely on the public vote and that it all needs to be monitored much more closely, so you may be right.

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However, I suppose on the bright side, it’s nice to see people like Croatia, Bosnia, Serbia, Macedonia all voting for each other. It wasn’t that long ago that they were fighting a nasty war against each other. Maybe that’s the solution to world conflict - set up a tacky song contest!
Those were exactly my thoughts when I followed the voting. However, we must consider that a lot of the voting is also done by people who simply vote for what they like and they only like what they know and understand. So, Scandinavians vote for Scandinavians since they have a similar taste in music, Balkan countries vote for themselves for the same reason. Did you know that Germany gave their twelve points to Turkey for the last couple of years? Guess why, there is a huge Turkish population in Germany. On the other hand, Germany gets a lot of points from Spain - mainly because a lot of Germans spend their holiday in Mallorca and similar places and vote from there.
It quoted singer Nicole, Germany's sole Eurovision winner, as saying: "It is obvious that Eastern European countries engage in dirty trade with points every year.

 

"Germany should withdraw from the competition."

BBC News

Note that "Bild" is the German equivalent to "Sun" and shouldn't be quoted in any serious article!
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I'm sure you watched it tonight :) Over 200 million did.

Grats to Sweden:

I preferred  it when it was traditionally so bad it was good. Now getting very worryingly polished.

Hard luck Russia, you should have won but Europe and additions don't like you. Second

Edited by Clavain
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Haven't watched it for years - not since we stopped taking it as seriously as the rest of Europe.

Our entry will never be given a decent score until we stop taking the p*** out of the whole thing. Not that I disagree with the criticisms about political voting etc, but it's our own fault that we've got no friends to vote for us out there.

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I used to follow the Eurovision religiously but hadn't bothered since coming to Australia. But the idea of an Australian entry was too much to resist. I watched last night in an "as-live" broadcast.

 

And for the first eight songs, it was great.

 

But then I remembered why I had stopped watching it. With 27 songs, there were simply too many to remember, and they all just blurred into one. Almost all of them started out as quiet, almost folksy things before reaching a crashing crescendo within a minute and a half. With lots of lights, fireworks, orchestration and crazy dancers. It was so boring.

 

Then, after dozing through most of the songs, we got the voting. Initially, it was amusing to try to predict who would get the top vote for each country. But after getting this right for a dozen countries, this got boring too. After an hour, they announced that they had got half way through the voting. Russia (again) and Sweden (again) seemed to be fighting it out. I couldn't remember either song so I didn't care. I went to bed and checked online to see who had won. It was Sweden. I went to sleep. 

 

I know a lot of people watch the Eurovision Song Contest, but it seems to me that it is a victim of its own success. By identifying which bits people liked, and doing them over and over again, every three minutes for several hours, it just becomes boring. It kills the life and the spontenaity from everything; it is just formulaic.

 

How I wish we could go back to 12-15 countries and a broadly open contest that anyone could win.

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Europe loves British music and can't understand why we don't enter any of our good music for the contest.

 

That was exactly what the German commentator said.

 

But, come on, predictable? Who would have guessed that, for the first time ever, Greece would not get 12 points from Cyprus? What the heck has happened there? Did the Turks overrun Cyprus?

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The best way to view Eurovision (and for some reason I can't QUITE put my finger on I really do quite like it every year) is to factor in some drinking games as we did with our two grown-up kids and their other halves last year.  A quick swig or shot for example when:

 

Any of the host presenters attempt inpromptu comedy (never works, never funny)

 

Any of the contestants make the peace V sign when the cameras go into the green room area

 

Any key change in a song

 

Any use of a wind machine to blow the singer's locks all over the place

 

Any use of the phrase "to our good neighbours" when awarding 12 points during the voting (possibly to avoid being invaded or having the gas turned off)

 

Any sudden and unexpected removal of items of clothing during a song

 

the list can continue ad nauseum, there are just SO many possibilities.

 

But I wouldn't get rid of it, oh no!  This could form the whole basis of my decision in Mr Cameron's in or out of Europe referendum that we have been promised.

WOT, NO EUROVISION?? :yikes:  

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