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A Little Larger Than the Entire Universe: Selected Poems


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Saw this in a list on Amazon - referring to the above book - and was wondering if it actually meant anything or if, as I suspect, it's the list author trying to look clever.

 

The list author says:

"Against the stereotype that poetry is hypersubjectivezed feeling stands the poetry of pessoa."

 

Hypersubjectivezed?

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Beats me Luna :)

 

I googled the word and it came up with four links - one for this thread here on BGO (top of the links by the way!) two for Amazon and one for a site called gourmetpopcorn. Both the Amazon and the gourmet were just reviews of the book.

 

But Google did ask me if I meant hyper subjectivized which still doesn't mean a lot to me.

 

Hopefully some learned BGO person will enlighten.

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Beats me Luna :)

 

I googled the word and it came up with four links - one for this thread here on BGO (top of the links by the way!) two for Amazon and one for a site called gourmetpopcorn. Both the Amazon and the gourmet were just reviews of the book.

 

But Google did ask me if I meant hyper subjectivized which still doesn't mean a lot to me.

 

Hopefully some learned BGO person will enlighten.

I'm hoping so, too, Tay. Thanks for the attempt, though. When I stuck it into Bing all I got was the list that it orginally came from, hence the request. I also put hypersubjectivezed into an online dictionary and it didn't come up so I'm increasingly leaning towards the sentence being completely meaningless (however the word is supposed to be spelled!).
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Whilst it's not a word, I think the writer is simply trying to refer to the notion that poetry is extremely subjectivised - in other words rooted intensely in the ideas and outlook of an individual and lacking true objectivity. I have no idea why this particular poet might be considered more objective than many others.

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I followed the same google links last night, and was equally unenlightened.

I also looked up Pessoa on Wikipedia, and decided that he was, to say the least odd, intense and pretentious. Or possibly had Dissociative Identity Disorder.

I think luna is right, the list writer is trying to impress.

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