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Vuvuzelas


hannibalheyes
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Loathe. Apparently they are "ethnic" and "traditional." Complete crap. They are mass-produced plastic. I ended up listening to the 5-Live commentary whilst watching the game last night, because radio commentators have to talk all of the time, which drowns out the drone to some extent.

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Luna Wrote:

but some of the players were very good looking (and they took their shirts off at the end!), so I suppose you could say that my attention was distracted.
:D

 

I first heard them on a news report in the build up and thought the reporter was standing near a nest of angry wasps!! Since then they have irritated the hell out of me the constant droan just gets under your skin!! Where's that band of musicians who constantly plays the great escape theme throughout the matches I think I'd sooner have that??

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I think that it is how they choose to celebrate (yes it's plastic - but they weren't all going to turn up with traditional, uniquely made vuvuzelas).

 

If we held this in Jamacia they would have steel drums or similar like at the cricket. We have to stop being so british about it all.

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If we held this in Jamacia they would have steel drums or similar like at the cricket. We have to stop being so british about it all.

There's nothing wrong with being British. British people embrace music and cultures from all over the world. This isn't music though - there's no harmonies, no melody or tune. It's just a hideous drone.

 

It's just the kind of instrument you'd never get sick of ramming down someone's throat. Would make a great pressie for a nephew to take home though ;):naughty:

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From the Guardian today*:-

 

"The v-word inevitably crept into the conversation, but only obliquely, as they considered what quintessentially English phenomenon crowds could bring to games in 2018, if the World Cup bid is successful, instead of vuvuzelas. Texts from listeners included some wonderful options. "A cacophony of tutting," said one. "The hand-under-the-armpit fart noise," said another."

 

I thought the 'cacophony of tutting' option was particularly hilarious.

 

*Radio review of Baddiel and Skinner

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Jen Wrote:

I hate the way that football seems to have become synonymous with patriotism in England these days.

 

A patriotism which seemed to evaporate after Friday's "match" (if you can call it that!) the number of houses in our area who had flags up Friday was significantly greater than the amount on Saturday morning!! (and the amount of disgarded car flags chucked in the gutter was also quite astounding!)

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Me too. I hate the way that football seems to have become synonymous with patriotism in England these days.

 

I hate the way that football is the only arena in which it's OK to celebrate being English.

 

Surely vuvuzelas are no more irritating than the British invention - the football rattle.

 

D'you know, I have been going to football matches in England for nearly 40 years, and I've never seen or heard one. I do remember hearing them on TV back in the 60s. I have however, heard my neighbour's attempt to "play" his vuvuzela. My first thought was that our house was collapsing, it sounded like groaning timbers. Next I decided that it was a cow in labour. Then, as the silly sod began to realise what it took to get a sound, the penny dropped. Unbelievable. And infinitely worse than a football rattle. Anyone who attempts to use one within my vicinity next season will end up wearing it on the inside.

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D'you know, I have been going to football matches in England for nearly 40 years, and I've never seen or heard one.

 

When I was a kid and we still had terraces at Dean Court, I remember one old bloke who used to stand near us always had one of those rattles. They were pretty loud, but they were also quite heavy, so they only got used in short, energetic bursts - as opposed to the vuvuzelas, which are played throughout the match.

 

I fully expect to see loads of kids brining vuvuzelas to games in the UK next season, but I'm also fairly sure that they will have all been consigned to the dustbin of history before the year is out.

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