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I'm on a mission of mercy to this poor, neglected section of the forum! So many very cool children's books and so many threads with no posts on :(

So - I figured everyone out there MUST have read some Roald Dahl. (If you haven't, then you can confess here and we'll offer you counselling :P )

What's your favourite Dahl book? And which are you not so keen on?

We've been reading some lesser known ones recently, collected from the front of cereal packets, and Esio Trot was both surreal and lovely - a really sweet love story involving a shy man, his true love, a great many tortoises, and a very long metal grabber!!

Anyone out there NOT like Dahl at all?????

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As a child, I loved Charlie and the Chocolate Factory and The Great Glass Elevator. I think this was partly down to the wonderful Primary school teacher that I had at the time, and he brought any books he read to life. I was so scared of those Vermicious Knids! I love George's Marvellous Medicine as well.

 

Matilda made a great film.

 

I struggled reading The BFG to my children.

 

Taking a quick straw poll of my children, and my son's (nearly 13) favourite is also Charlie, closely followed by Boy. My 10 year old daughter's favourite is Fantastic Mr Fox, then The BFG (my reading obviously didn't put her off!), and she absolutely loves Revolting Rhymes. My 7 year old daughter has yet to discover the joys of Dahl.

 

Thinking about Fantastic Mr Fox, at my son's first primary school, the school play was to be Fantastic Mr Fox. I was a parent governor at the time, and I had a parent complain to me about the choice because she felt it was inappropriate for a Christian school. She thought that it taught the children it was right to steal and drink cider. People don't give children enough credit that they are able to distinguish between fact and fiction! Needless, to say the play went ahead, and the kids loved acting in it.

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Ooh so many....my favourite was Matilda, although I also loved Boy, Going Solo and Danny the Champion of the World. Oh and a book called something like 'the wonderful story of henry sugar and six more'...not sure if that's the correct name, but I absolutely loved that. Sadly I never actually owned it, but I had the library's copy pretty much consistently for about a year!

 

I didn't so much like The Witches, The Twits or James and the Giant Peach. I don't think I ever bothered to re-read any of these 3...they are the only Roald Dahl books on my shelves that aren't practically falling apart!

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I'm not a great Dahl fan. I enjoyed The BFG, and Danny, Champion of the World, but feel fairly indifferent about the rest.---Except for George's Marvelous Medicine, which I took agin when, after watching it dramatised on TV, one of my sons and a friend (aged about 10) took themselves off to make their own concoction, which resulted in spilled bleach on the bathroom floor, and ruined trousers where they sat in it!

 

As far as I'm concerned, the best thing about Roald Dahl's books is Quentin Blake!

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Roald Dahl is such a cool children's writer - love him or hate him, there aren't many other writers who can write genuinely original, captivating stories that are definitely children's books at the same time. As you may of guessed, i'm a bit of a fan.

 

I love Danny Champion of the World, Matilda, the BFG, Fantastic Mr Fox. I had George's Marvelous Medicine on tape and listened to it repeatedly, it must have been so annoying! Thankfully I never used bleach in my own improvised versions... I love the bit in Boy where he puts goat poo in the ancient big sister's fiancee's pipe!

 

Not so keen on The Twits - scary! And The Magic Finger was a bit scary at the time too!

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I love Roald Dahl. The BFG and Matilda are brilliant books. Not too keen on Boy, but I liked Going Solo. Charlie and the Chocolate factory is my all time favourite Dahl book. The Witches is a close second.

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Ronald Dahl runs a very close second to all my time favourite childrens author, Enid Blyton. We read alot of Dahl in Junior school and my weekly treat was for my Mum to buy me a new Dahl book! My favourites are Fantastic Mr Fox, Danny The Champion of the World and Charlie and The Chocolate Factory. Was never fond of the Charlie and The Great Glass Elevator or any of his later stuff. However, I am quite fond of George's Marvellous Medicine, after seeing Rik Mayall's performance on Jackanory! I think the first Harry Potter book is of a similar style to Dahl. :)

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I think I read all of Roald Dahls books more than once when I was younger. I hated Danny the Chapion of the World though. Possibly a casualty of having to read it with the rest of my class at school! I didnt like Boy or Going Solo much either - they wre too heart-thumping!

 

I reread Charlie and the Chocolate Factory, the BFG and Matilda as part of my uni course, and really loved them still. I always wanted to be Matilda - does that count as loving the book?

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Without a doubt my favourite Dahl is the Fantastic Mr Fox! I lost count of how many times I read this as a child. George's Marvellous Medicine is another great.

 

Not really sure what is the worst as I can't remember my experiences of many others and feel like my memories are from the films rather than the books - hence I have a strong aversion to Matilda as a result of the annoying brat who plays her in the movie!

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That's funny, I just popped in here to see if anyone was chatting about Roald Dahl, and here is a thread my sister started on exactly that!

 

I have just read George's Marvellous Medicine to my kids and we all hooted with laughter all through it. (I got a bit worried when boy1 said to boy2 and girl 'hey, we can make our own marvellous medicine...') and we've just finished The Twits. We did start the BFG a while ago but gave up because for the first few chapters you didn't know the BFG was good and so him sneaking around peeping in at children asleep was scaring them just before bed. I might try it again now they are a bit older. I've ordered Fantastic Mr Fox for 1p from Amazon, never read it before, even as a child, so I'm looking forward to that one.

 

As a child I loved George, BFG, Witches, both the Charlies (even had 'Charlie et le grand ascenseur de verre' in French!) (sp?)

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Recovered Replies

 

Momo 27th March 2006 09:48 PM

 

The only children's book by Roald Dahl I have read entirely is James and the Giant Peach. I have read other books partly when my children started reading by themselves but still wanted me to read to them, so they read parts by themselves and I carried on, then they read the next part alone etc.

I knew him as an adult writer before I even realized he wrote children's stories. I love his macabre short stories (although I normally don't like short stories very much), my favourite, I think, is Parson's Pleasure. I didn't live far from where he used to live and is buried and there were lots of exhibitions about his work in our area, so I saw a few of them.

During my time in the school library, there were a lot of children who loved his stories. I remember the girls in particular loved Matilda. Maybe I should try that one. My children liked The BFG and Danny the Champion of the World if I remember that correctly.

 

katrina 19th April 2006 04:18 PM

 

i loved roald dahl as a child i think matilda and the witches were my favorite, have discoved the revolting rhymes this year as a teacher as well as boy. can't think of a book by him i didn't like but have never read the fantastic mr fox.

 

can't wait to have kids so i can reread them all again.

 

Momo 19th April 2006 08:50 PM

Originally Posted by katrina

can't wait to have kids so i can reread them all again.

 

You don't have to wait for that. If you enjoy them, why not read them now. Also, you might have kids like my boys who didn't like really like Dahl much.

 

supersexy007 20th April 2006 01:35 PM

 

LOVED BFG and James and the giant peach - the latter reminds me of being laughed at at school because I drew a picture of the sharks eating the peach, but I thought sharks were just triangles, ie I drew lots black triangles (complete with eyes, nose and mouth) eating the peach. No one told me sharks were more than just a fin!!!!

 

:thinking::ssh:

 

PinkyWolfy 3rd August 2006 11:02 PM

Originally Posted by donnae

Thinking about Fantastic Mr Fox, at my son's first primary school, the school play was to be Fantastic Mr Fox. I was a parent governor at the time, and I had a parent complain to me about the choice because she felt it was inappropriate for a Christian school. She thought that it taught the children it was right to steal and drink cider. People don't give children enough credit that they are able to distinguish between fact and fiction! Needless, to say the play went ahead, and the kids loved acting in it

.

 

This is my favourite Roald Dahl - your comments really struck a chord with me as I too am a School Governor and have heard many similar, ridiculous comments! Could they not see that the story takes an interesting turn because Mr Fox ends up helping the entire community of animals, providing a most satisfying ending of living happily ever after (except for the three farmers, who deserve their less glorious fate)?

 

gg106 18th August 2006 08:16 AM

 

Dahl is fantastic! When my second eldest son was about 8 he was a really reluctant reader. I introduced him to Dahl and that was it, he has not stopped since. He is now 12 and has even had a go at reading The Hobbit, though he still favours 'funny stories'. He was absolutely captivated by the Lemony Snickett series. So yes, Roald Dahl is Fantastic!!

 

Flingo 18th August 2006 11:28 AM

 

The 13th September is officially "Roald Dahl day", as it would have been a significant birthday for him if he was still alive (I can't remember which one though!). The latest news that I heard was that the celebrations are going to last throughout September as there are so many enthusiastic people wanting to celebrate.

 

Has anyone been to the Roald Dahl museum in Buckinghamshire?

 

Momo 19th August 2006 12:58 PM

 

He would have turned 90!

Unfortunately, though I used to live in Buckinghamshire, I have never visited the museum. It only just started then, to be honest, so that's an excuse.

 

Flingo 19th August 2006 04:33 PM

 

Originally Posted by Momo

He would have turned 90!

Unfortunately, though I used to live in Buckinghamshire, I have never visited the museum. It only just started then, to be honest, so that's an excuse.

 

Thank you! I kept thinking 70 or 100 and knew both were wrong!

 

Surely, the museum is a good excuse to come and visit some of your old neighbours?! Stupidly, I have never been either and my family are still in Bedfordshire so not too far from Bucks either!

 

Hilary 25th August 2006 02:02 PM

 

Me, boy1, boy2 and girl are currently reading through Danny, The Champion Of The World together. We are just over halfway through now and the boys are finding it gripping stuff. (Girl is 2 so although she likes curling up with us to read, she's not really taking much in ~ she likes the pictures though and can recognise Danny or Daddy at 100 paces!) Ds1 said, 'this book is amazing because you can really, really imagine that you're there and know what everything looks like'. I have to say, I am inclined to agree, you get such a sense of the geography of the place and what everything is like, but yet, it isn't full of annoyingly wordy description. I love it and I am loving passing it on to the next generation, I mean, Danny (poaching aside) has a pretty perfect childhood in lots of ways, and without all the many things we deem it necessary for kids to have nowadays.

Momo 25th August 2006 03:48 PM

 

Originally Posted by Hilary

Ds1 said, 'this book is amazing because you can really, really imagine that you're there and know what everything looks like'.

 

That's the best think anyone can say about a book but if a child says this it means you really taught them to appreciate reading. Well done, Hilary!

 

Flingo 26th August 2006 01:18 PM

 

I remember that we had "Danny" read to us in class at school, maybe when I was about 7 years old, and I dreaded story time as the book is so atmospheric and gripping! I was terrified I would embarass myself by being scared! Well done Hillary - I hope you enjoy the rest of it.

 

Hilary 26th August 2006 07:41 PM

 

Thank you Momo, I'm really trying to instill a love of reading in them. I sometimes feel I am battling constantly with the temptation of the tv and the x-box my dear husband bought 'for himself' but which the children play on too. But whenever I suggest another chapter of the book, they always rush over so I must be winning on some level, I guess.

 

I think I can remember Danny being a bit scary as a child too, Flingo. But I was easily scared which my kids don't seem to be. Mind you, the early chapters of the BFG scared them so much a couple of years ago, we gave up and read something else... :rolleyes:

 

Momo 26th August 2006 10:06 PM

Originally Posted by Hilary

I sometimes feel I am battling constantly with the temptation of the tv and the x-box my dear husband bought 'for himself' but which the children play on too.

 

Oh, don't worry, we all do! But some of us manage to get them interested in books, too, and some people don't. My boys always loved reading and although it gets a little less when they get older as the other attractions are very overwhelming, they still like to read and usually have a book on the go. So, don't give up, it's worth it!

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We have also giggled our way through Roald Dahl's Revolting Rhymes. These are officially 'very funny' for small boys! And they have the advantage of being fun for a grown up to read too, which always helps. Some bits of them needed explaining to my six year old but other than that, they were great.

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I don't actually like Raold Dahl. I like Gene Wilder as Willy Wonka, and I like the little brat who plays Matilda, but as for reading the books, I'm not keen. I must have read most of them to the kids over the years, and they all love them, but I find them a bit predictably anarchic. I don't mind adults being portrayed as idiots, as most of them are, and I love Lemony Snickett's stupid grown-ups, but there's something just a bit off about Dahl's writing. I think maybe his kids aren't really kids, just small Raold Dahls.

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Danny in Danny, Champion of the World isn't really anarchic is he? I loved this book when I was young but can't quite remember now...

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My daughter is four and we have read the Magic Finger, Fantastic Mr Fox and George's... and she loved them. Her concentration can wain a bit at times but I enjoy reading them so much that I feel the need to badger her into it.

 

I loved them as a kind and can't think of a single one I don't like.

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Actually Danny is one of few that I haven't read (the film was good). It's just a matter of taste, I suppose (unlike how I feel about Harry Potter, where the loathing has just grown with every bit of hype and every repetetive story line, and every piece of bad grammar and style, until I'm ready to do serious damage to the next JK Rowling book that I see - oops, was that a bit ranty?).

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Don't worry, Boris, we Potter fans can take it on the chin! :)

 

I have a very vivid memory of The Twits being read to us at school when I was about six. I couldn't say whether that's the best or not, but it has a place in my heart.

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Don't worry, Boris, we Potter fans can take it on the chin! :)

 

 

We sure can! Our heads are so full of all things Hogwart anyway, so we don't pay attention to the anti-Harry rants.

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