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SudoKris

The Woman in White

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It's been quite a while since I read The Woman in White, but I remember it was a very pleasant surprise! I found it a thoroughly entertaining read.

After having read The Moonstone with BGO members (and I really liked that one), I just had to read The Woman in White. I wouldn't be able to tell which one I enjoyed more, they are both marvellous.

Having enjoyed TWiW so much I read The Moonstone straight after and was hugely disappointed. Too much of a good thing perhaps!

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I'm just about half-way through The Woman in White, and while I'm generally very fond of both 19th-century novels and sensation literature, I can't really get into this one.

I know what you mean. I read it a few years ago: it's great for the first few chapters, but then it drags. It picks up again towards the end, and is worth sticking with, but it's too long. The other W.C. novel i've read, 'The Moonstone', is great, though.

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I finished this book a few months ago and found it exceptional in every way! The characters were very interesting, and the story kept me riveted. This is the first book I've read by Wilkie Collins and I'm looking forward to reading more. :)

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Recently listened to TWIW and Moonstone unabridged on audio, absolutely loved both of them. Maybe this would be a good way for anyone who had trouble getting into them to try.

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I absolutely loved The Woman in White. Right from the opening page, I was hooked. I felt frightened with the characters throughout - Marian on the balcony, Walter right at the start with Anne. My heart raced for them, and it's not very ofen a book does that too me.

 

Normally I need silence to be able to consentrate wholly on a novel, but this had me sucked in and I found it easy to read anywhere. And it kept me up long into the night.

 

My favourite character was Marian; she is the strong woman, who always got things done. Laura, while I felt for her situation, I felt a little indifferent to her; you never really see anything from her pov so it was difficult to decide whether I liked her or not.

 

Count Fosco: eugh. Didn't like him one bit, not even right at the start when Marian's fears seemed unfounded. There was something about him! I was glad when he turned out to be the 'baddie'.

 

All in all, an absolutely brilliant read. Can't reccommend it hightly enough. I've got The Moonstone to read soon (when uni is over, anyway!) and am looking forward to it already.

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I love this book - I don't know why but I've always been put off about the title as if it might be a bit romantic or something but then I read somewhere that it was a detective novel or sorts and thought that sounded more like my kind of thing.

 

I got reading it online over the Christmas period and decided come Monday and being back at work and back on the bus that I couldn't face big gaps of not reading it, so I nipped into W and got it.

 

snow day yesterday allowed me to read the final 350 pages and what a read!

 

I liked all the voices of the characters sections, I love how one will reveal something totally innocently but also provide the reader with more questions. The housekeeper was brilliant - I only wish she had been aware sooner. The whole scheme of was superb.

 

I know that I will read this book over and over in the years to come.

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very much enjoyed this book, too, when I read it years ago. Whenever I find fellow mystery lovers, I ask if they have read it since it's supposed to be the first detective story.

 

There was a 1997 BBC adaptation starring Andrew Lincoln and Tara Fitzgerald that I thought was very good. It took a few liberties with the book, but it certainly kept the feeling of the book. I watched it with my daughter and niece. We started out watching it in the dark, but we all got so scared that my niece finally said, "I think we need to turn on a lamp." We watched a little longer, but we were all so scared that my niece finally observed, "I think we need to turn on another lamp." Whoever played Fosco was very good in the part.

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I have also watched this in the meantime and found it a good adaptation, though I think a mini-series would have given it more credit.

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I loved this book, though at first it took me a couple of hundred pages to really get into it. I could not put it down then. It's beautifully crafted, the characters are very strong and very memorable. The form of the novel is interesting and adds suspense. I also love how you can get into depth with psychology etc So many fascinating articles written about it.

 

I have another 3 of his books on my tbr pile and also a couple of other 1860's sensation novels. (and a theory book about sensation fiction to read) --that's testimony to how good I thought WIW was.

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Whilst I really enjoy The Woman in White, perhaps reading The Moonstone first would get you simpatico with Collins's writing style. I find The Moonstone a faster paced novel and thus easier to read. They are both well worth the effort, both firm favourites. Hope you enjoy in the end.

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I'll have to read this one sooner or later. I've not yet heard a dissenting voice on it from fellow Victorian buffs. Seems to even oust Dickens in popularity.

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Whilst I really enjoy The Woman in White, perhaps reading The Moonstone first would get you simpatico with Collins's writing style. I find The Moonstone a faster paced novel and thus easier to read. They are both well worth the effort, both firm favourites. Hope you enjoy in the end.

 

Well I found Moonstone incredibly slow and dull so don't think I'll be trying this one any time soon! :)

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Have just finished reading this book and have enjoyed reading other peoples' reaction to the novel.  It is the first Wilkie Collins novel that I have read but I suspect it will not be the last.  I felt engrossed by the story from the very beginning and felt that I cared about the main characters from an early stage.

 

Like other readers I really enjoyed the fact that the story was told from a number of points of view.  I have read other novels that are told through journals as parts of this story has been and have found it a likeable way of reading.  Wilkie Collins' style is very easy to read and although I love Dickens I would have to say that Collins is far easier to read and understand.  Considering the complicated plot involved in this novel I did not find it at all difficult to follow and really enjoyed that number of smaller stories within the main one which present themselves as you go along.

 

I felt as if the book portrayed very well the lack of choices open to women of the time and how reliant they were on the men in their lives.  Even if a women inherited money she seemed to have very little control over it herself and had to hope that the men in her life i.e. father, uncle. brother or husband treated her fairly.  In this case because her uncle had no interest and wanted a quiet life she lost everything including for a while her identity. 

 

My favourite character was definitely Marion.  Certainly one of the stronger female characters portrayed in books of the period and although I cannot say that I became as attached to her as characters such as Jane Eyre I feel that she is one that I will remember for some time to come.  The character I disliked the most was Mr Fairlie and every time that he came into the story I wanted to shake him.  I am only glad that I did not have to deal with him as I think I would have been far from patient.  The Count as a really good villain and I was quite glad that he got his just deserts in the end as I feel that I could not have felt completely as ease for the main characters while he still floated around. 

 

Overall one of those books that I am sorry to finish as feel a bit bereft for a while.   It is probably one that I will come back to and read again in the future.

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