Jump to content

Recommended Posts

Some years ago, I bought a boxed set of Penguin books called The Essential Collection. Whilst having a clear-out at the weekend, I re-discovered the set. Of the ten books, I have so far read four (On The Road, Bonjour Tristesse, Breakfast at Tiffany's and The Heart of The Matter). Of the rest, I really didn't fancy A Clockwork Orange or Animal Farm (but fully intend to try them one day), and that left To The Lighthouse, One Hundred Years of Solitude, A Passage to India, and LCL. I was put off reading this about 37 years ago by an English teacher who recommended it (he was an utter spanner and I had no time for anything he said) but I reckon it's time to forgive and forget. I really don't know anything about the book, apart from the fact that the lover in question is the estate's gardener, and that the book caused quite a stir and a ground-breaking court case.

 

I will let you know how I get on, but if any BGOers have already read it, please post your thoughts.

Link to post
Share on other sites

For a book that caused such controversy I don't remember all that much but I do remember some things....John Thomas and Lady Jane, the phrase demi-vierge (if i've got that right) and not a lot else but it has been a long time.....

Link to post
Share on other sites

It's one of my favourite books MFJ, and I would love it if you enjoyed it. I think it's a great story, well-told and...gosh, just wonderful. Apart from a dull chapter on the geography of the area...

Link to post
Share on other sites

 

I will let you know how I get on, but if any BGOers have already read it, please post your thoughts.

 

I read Lady C back in the Sixties, shortly after the court case. I was an undergrad at London University and we had to do the whole of Lawrence in those days. When Professor Barbara Hardy read aloud from selected passages, she read the juicy bits with aplomb, but I swear I noticed a flush spread from her neck when she read aloud the, then, dreaded F-word. Those were the days! She then offered a seminar on it, which I didn't sign up for. I thought it a pretty dull and schematic book, full of Lawrentian hobby-horses and flat characters. Well, any book that begins "Ours is a tragic age . . . ' has me reaching for my red pen. (Incidentally I feel the same about Tolstoy's opening to Anna Karenina - one made much of by critics - something about all happy families being the same, or some such rubbish. But I do love AK and would read it again)

Link to post
Share on other sites

I actually read this very recently for the first time. Considering I'd studied Sons and Lovers and other DHL books and lived in Nottingham and visited Eastwood and his old house etc, I can't believe I hadn't read it before.

 

It struck me that it is very typical DHL, the descriptions of the surroundings, the characters, the themes, the class 'thing'. I loved it. I didn't know what I was expecting, given the furore at the time, but most of it was fairly pedestrian by today's standards. I think the most shocking bit to me was some of the language and how it really seemed at odds with the era of the book. That contrast was really stark.

 

But it really took me back to my late teens when I knew Sons and Lovers inside out and back to front and it is now making a reappearance on my 'to read' list.

Link to post
Share on other sites

It's a book I avoided because it always seemed very Nana-ish (literally... my Nana told me that waaaaaaay back, she had a copy that she read wrapped in brown paper)

 

WHen I did read it, I found it surprisingly good ... well, considering the furore. Not Nana-ish at all, not scandalous, not even mildly shocking.

 

For something once-banned that still packs a punch, my vote would go to Lolita. I first read that as a teen and I remember some of the scenes (particularly where you realise just how much of an unpersoned thing Lo is to Humbert) made my head spin, and make me distinctly uncomfortable even today. Brilliant, brilliant writing.

Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 5 weeks later...

Finished it at the weekend.

 

I enjoyed from a historical perspective, much as I do, say, music from the 1940s... in other words, it was OK on its own, but far more interesting when considered in the context of what followed.

Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 4 weeks later...
Some years ago, I bought a boxed set of Penguin books called The Essential Collection. Whilst having a clear-out at the weekend, I re-discovered the set. Of the ten books, I have so far read four (On The Road, Bonjour Tristesse, Breakfast at Tiffany's and The Heart of The Matter). Of the rest, I really didn't fancy A Clockwork Orange or Animal Farm (but fully intend to try them one day), and that left To The Lighthouse, One Hundred Years of Solitude, A Passage to India, and LCL.
I have this box set too (bought for me by my mother as she felt I needed to read some more modern classics - rather than the "old" classics and Sweet Valley High). Interestingly, I read them in rather a different order with On the Road, Bonjour Tristesse, Breakfast at Tiffany's, Animal Farm, To The Lighthouse, One Hundred Years of Solitude and Lady Chatterley's Lover.

 

I think LCL was one of the first I read, purely because I'd have been about 15 years old at the time and liked my reading to shock.

 

WHen I did read it, I found it surprisingly good ... well, considering the furore. Not Nana-ish at all, not scandalous, not even mildly shocking.

And that sums up my memory of it too - disappointing in a way to the 15 year old me!

Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 2 weeks later...

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Loading...
×
×
  • Create New...