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Just finished watching the last few frames of the snooker and am chuffed to see the lovely John Higgins win.

:notworthy Also Big Up to Michaela Tabb for her capacity to stand for so long in those high heels. She's smart, sexy and talented and totally bucks the trend among some of those dowdy refs.

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Just finished watching the last few frames of the snooker and am chuffed to see the lovely John Higgins win.

 

Aw, did he? He's a former pupil of our school. I taught his wee brother.

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I have just started watching the first series of The Inbetweeners. I am up to episode 3 now, and actually I am rather embarrassed at how much it makes me snort out loud in laughter. It's puerile, but bloody hell, is it funny.

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I watched the whole 2 series of The Inbetweeners in one go a couple of weeks ago when I was at home for the day. Loved, loved, loved it! Yes, it's puerile - just up my street... Can't believe I missed it on TV - thank goodness for 4OD & iPlayer!

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I keep meaning to try this. I'm a fan of Skins and hear this is in its way more realistic even while being more fantastic in its comedy.

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I started watching the first series of Life on Mars this morning, I think I am 4 episodes in. Boy, I am glad I listened to my clever BGO friends - how good is that show?! Thank the lord for DVD boxsets.

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I'm a fan of Skins and hear this is in its way more realistic even while being more fantastic in its comedy.
I'm not a fan of Skins really, a bit too gimmicky for my liking, but The Inbetweeners is hysterical. I can't help snorting with laughter at it. So far, it is a fairly accurate portrayal of teen boys...as much as I know.

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Caught up on the poetry programmes that we recorded on BBC4. Goodness, didn't Simon Armitage have some rotten drenching weather following the tracks of Sir Gawain and the Green Knight.

 

Anybody watch the progs about T S Eliot?

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I've only watched the less intellectual ones - My Life In Verse (Sheila Hancock and Robert Webb so far).

Robert Webb helped me make a bit more sense of Prufrock, and I would have watched the TS Elliot programme on the strength of that - only I had an early night instead :o

 

I also watched Off By Heart (twice), which was both enjoyable and interesting.

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Goodness, didn't Simon Armitage have some rotten drenching weather following the tracks of Sir Gawain and the Green Knight.

He certainly did. I enjoyed some of the wilder coastal scenery though, but I thought Simon Armitage kept on repeating himself ad infinitum. The one thing that struck me most about the programme was how fast local dialects have changed in recent years. I found it quite striking that some of the older people in Derbyshire still understand some of the dialect words a 14th century poem which are completely unintelligable to the younger generation. Cultural evolution has certainly sped up in the last 30 years or so.

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Anybody watch the progs about T S Eliot?
Recorded it chuntzy and hope to watch it some time later this week. Hoping for great things.

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I watched two episodes from the second series of Inspector George Gently today. I've got a couple more to watch on Sky+. This is a very enjoyable series set in 1964 in Cumbria and Northumbria featuring a London detective who has relocated to the north east. I hope the BBC make more as there are plenty of books on which to base stories. Alan Hunter wrote 47 novels featuring Gently between 1944 and 1998.

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I watched the second George Gently series, having programme hopped onto the first episode and been transfixed by the fashions of my younger days.

I moved away from home in 1964, it was a damn good year :D

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Simon Armitage has such a lovely lilting voice. I could listen to him talk all day.

 

And captured the feeling of the wild and supernatural elements in this bizarre legend. No mean poet himself, why didn't Armitage make it as Laureate?

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I've only watched the less intellectual ones - My Life In Verse (Sheila Hancock and Robert Webb so far).

Robert Webb helped me make a bit more sense of Prufrock,

 

I understand that Richard Webb is a comedian and certainly his account of his Life in Verse had its funny side. Trouble was it was all about West and nothing much about Eliot. 'You may be wondering why I'm wearing this weird get-up?' No, you look a proper Charley, but Eliot wasn't that funny. 'You may wonder why I've begun this programme in Lincolnshire.' Yes, but, now you've told me, I understand. You were born in Lincolnshire. But Eliot was surely rather more west than that! Then we see Webb ouside his own humble home, hear from his English teacher about his scholastic progress and the incipient growth of his interest in that rarefied and supposedly difficult subject, poetry.

 

No, this patronising of poetry and Eliot won't do. I preferred the Arena one on the poet the following day, one where one heard and saw the man in all his stained majesty. (Why so little, incidentally, on Tom and Viv?)

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The clue may be in the programme title - My Life In Verse ?

 

Webb started the programme talking about a poem that had significance for him, one that spoke to him at a particular stage in his life, as did Sheila Hancock in her programme.

They each then spoke about other favourite poems, and why they had found them relevant at particular times and in particular circumstances, coming back eventually to the poem they started with.

 

Now I like poems - but I'm not particularly interested in biographies of the poets that write them. Occasionally some detail of the poets life will help me to understand a poem more clearly (and realising that Eliot was 17 when he wrote Prufrock did that).

My response to poems is instinctive and emotional, and my understanding of them is to the words as they speak to me, not to any different meaning they may have had for the poet.

 

How to kill a poem "Now, what do you think the poet meant when he wrote that?"

 

So, I like to listen to other people talk about their favourite poems - to enthuse about them and to share their emotional and instinctive responses to them.

 

I didn't feel patronised by the programme, but I do feel that your comments about it are patronising to me and others whose response to poetry is visceral rather than intellectual.

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And captured the feeling of the wild and supernatural elements in this bizarre legend. No mean poet himself, why didn't Armitage make it as Laureate?

Absolutely. I guess it was the competition tha kept him out of being poet laureate as Andrew Motion and Carol Ann Duffy are obvious choices.

 

I always think being poet laureate must be a bit of a poisoned chalice as you're asking a poet who writes about things they care about, to write about things they may have no interest in whatsoever. Ted Hughes seemed the oddest choice when most of his poetry is deep, dark and about nature.

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We're currently watching the football. Cosmic :(

 

Hubby will probably start huffing and puffing and calling Crouch or Rooney a donkey pretty soon :rolleyes:

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Also watching footie. :D

 

I am calling nobody anything at the moment. Rooney is hardly a donkey having scored twice. I do think Beckham's corner kicks are feeble though. And Crouch still looks like a gangling misfit. Apart from that our goalie is redundant.

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Did anyone else see that new C4 programme called How The Other Half Live? It's about a rich family sponsoring a poor family, like you would someone in the developing world, and it annoys me so much.

 

It's just all about money and material posessions. The poor kids have to make a video bemoaning their plight and showing what they haven't got. The poor folk get cheques for thousands of pounds from the rich folk, then they eventually meet, at the rich folk's house and the poor folk are terribly grateful and the rich folk feel good. The poor folk have to drool at the vast wealth of the rich folk, like they've never seen a swimming pool or a pony before. No-one talks about why they are poor or what they might do to get themselves out of their situation. Then the rich folk visit the poor folk in their crime-ridden council estate and feel sorry for their lack of ponies. Eventually, they do something else to help the poor folk improve their plight. The end.

 

It's so patronising and irritating. In the first episode, the rich folk's dad was about my age and grew up near me in a council house. But he never seemed to talk to the kids of the other family about the choices he made which helped him get where he was. At least all those folk were likeable, unlike the folk in this week's episode ... I don't want to rant, so I'll stop here!

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