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I'm about 200 pages into The Glass Book of Dream Eaters and really enjoying it despite it being an awkward to hold 700 page hardback.

 

This is the one that was the publishing-online-experiment in parts wasn't it? And you could get it in fancy instalments, much like the Dickens serialisation? You must let us know if it is any good. Or just a publishing novelty!

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I am at this moment ploughing my way through A Sword from Red Ice...and I have to say I am quiet enjoying it!

 

Gosh, JV jones still keeps me nearly hollering at the characters of the book heehee (oh for ten minutes in there to set things right haha)

 

Great book so far :D

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This is the one that was the publishing-online-experiment in parts wasn't it? And you could get it in fancy instalments, much like the Dickens serialisation? You must let us know if it is any good. Or just a publishing novelty!

I'm not sure about the online publishing, but it was certainly in installments - I think they produced a limited number (1000?) which was posted via snail mail to the successful people fortnightly.

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Consider The Lobster by David Foster Wallace. This is a collection of his essays and was published in book form in 2005.

For anyone new to Foster Wallace, he is endlessly amusing. He combines the heady intellect and mischievous wit of writers like mid period Martin Amis. His short stories and essays are peppered with footnotes, giving the impression that he's a writer who has to explain every single tick of the thought processes in his massive brain, but I find that endearing: it's almost as if he's slightly neurotic and needs to clarify every statement in case of misunderstanding in a Woody Allan Sleeper phase sort of way.

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H'm, that must be why "Infinite Jest" is so imposingly large. I have read one story of his in an anthology, I can't remember the title but swimming was involved. It was good enough that I added his short story collection "Girl with Curious Hair" on Mount TBR.

 

My RL book group is reading fiction from South Africa this month, so I started Damon Galgut's "The Good Doctor" last night. On the basis of the first three chapters, most impressive.

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I have just started reading PostCards From No Mans Land by Aiden Chambers and I am enjoying it so far. I am also reading Emily Bronte's Wuthering Heights for the third time.

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I have just started reading PostCards From No Mans Land by Aiden Chambers and I am enjoying it so far. I am also reading Emily Bronte's Wuthering Heights for the third time.

I love 'Wuthering Heights', one of my all time favourites. :)

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I have just started reading PostCards From No Mans Land by Aiden Chambers and I am enjoying it so far. I am also reading Emily Bronte's Wuthering Heights for the third time.

Welcome to BGO, Miss Bee. Good to see another new member who can appreciate the wonders of Young Adult Fiction! I don't think we have any threads for Chambers, so please start one when you get to the end of Postcards.

Also - we'd love to hear a little more about you, and what else you like reading, in the Please Introduce Yourself thread!

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Brilliant book! I do hope you enjoy it, FLS!

I've been fancying this too, perhaps in the New Year.

 

Currently reading HP & The Deathly Hallows (I've waded through the whole lot since Deathly Hallows came out, just so that I could read it, and have only just got to it!)

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Started The God of Small Things by Arundhati Roy the other day

Brilliant book! I do hope you enjoy it, FLS!

 

As mentioned on the Which Bookers? thread, I realised towards the end of this that I'd been reading it too quickly, and that I'd missed out on the intricate narrative structure.

So it's in the mental "must-re-read" pile, with about a hundred others... :(

 

What I really want to know is how, and how well, it compares to The Inheritance of Lost (which is on the not-yet-read pile).

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What I really want to know is how, and how well, it compares to The Inheritance of Lost (which is on the not-yet-read pile).

Unfortunately, jfp, I haven't read that so can't comment! However, the structural and linguistic intricacies of The God of Small Things are at the heart of what I found so wonderful about it.

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(

 

What I really want to know is how, and how well, it compares to The Inheritance of Lost (which is on the not-yet-read pile).

 

I've read both and consider The Inheritance of Loss by Kiran Desai of less interest and worth than The God of Small Things. The imaginative quality and the prose of the latter held me much more and, just as importantly, so did the story.

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grapes of wrath - john steinbeck

two wheels - matt seaton

a journey through india - manchan magan

 

recently i finished "nada" by carmen laforet. i really liked it. was very well written and she did an excellent job in creating the characthers

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