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That's a great word! Can you give me any further details on this novel, now that you have aroused my attention with such a creative word!

Hi, Toothbrush, I will post quickly now, though I may try and post a longer review when I finish it.

 

The book is set 1960's rural Ireland. It is an account of a close-knit family, children, step-mother and autocratic father. It is beautifully written, almost underwritten, but carries huge emotional power and weight. Don't read it if it's plot you want, but it can't be bettered for character, mood and feeling. For me it's one of the best English language books of the last century.

 

Good luck with your ever-growing TBR pile, by the way. There's no turning back now!

 

I am embarrassed to say I misspelled the author's name - it is McGahern.

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Don't read it if it's plot you want, but it can't be bettered for character, mood and feeling.

 

Sometimes I feel there are too many plots in novels, and way too many novels with plots. Perhaps including a plot is really just a way of covering up for shallow characters and a cardboard environment... :rolleyes: No, I'm joking, plots are essential in keeping us readers organised and thinking upon a logical path.

 

For me it's one of the best English language books of the last century.

 

That is very high praise indeed, and along with the temptation of not having to follow a plot, this should be a real literary treasure! :D

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Talking of "Irish" books - having started A Swift Pure Cry on Monday, I wasn't getting into it (40 pages down as at last night). This evening however, I have come home, gone out in the garden with it and read another 200. I'm gripped! The language is completely Irish - the lyricism and flow of the words purely enchanting. I get what everyone has said to me about it now (will finish it after I've eaten dinner!).

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Talking of "Irish" books - having started A Swift Pure Cry on Monday, I wasn't getting into it (40 pages down as at last night). This evening however, I have come home, gone out in the garden with it and read another 200. I'm gripped! The language is completely Irish - the lyricism and flow of the words purely enchanting. I get what everyone has said to me about it now (will finish it after I've eaten dinner!).

Who is it by, Flingo?

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Who is it by, Flingo?

Siobhan Dowd - it's a young adult book, and a fantastic one at that! Just awarded it 5 stars.

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I've just given up on Carry Me Down. I was finding it hard and depressing reading, despite the positive comments on here.

I've turned to Weekend by William McIlvaney, which I've had on my mental wishlist for months, waiting for the paperback. So far, it hasn't disappointed.

He has a great turn of phrase. One student says to another:

"She doesn't just come to uni. She makes royal visits"

Lots of characters, though.

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He has a great turn of phrase. One student says to another:

"She doesn't just come to uni. She makes royal visits"

Lots of characters, though.

c035.gif

 

Your book sounds very interesting, brightphoebus? Please, start a thread when you're finished. Thanks!

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Recently finished Case Histories by Kate Atkinson for my library RG. found this hard to get into because but once I was four chapters in (not long ones) it started to bite and took hold so that I found it hard to put down in the end.

 

Currently reading The Portable Door by Tom Holt. Didn't find this hard to get into but could not see the humour (it says Brilliantly Funny on the cover) until about a third in. I am now laughing out loud occasionally.

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Portrait of a Lady by Henry James

 

Snap Bea, I am going to start that tonight. And welcome to BGO!

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I read it (Portrait of a Lady) a few months ago and did find the beginning excruciatingly slow but did get into it and then enjoyed. Be interested to hear your experience with it Bea.

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Hi Bea! Welcome to BGO.

We have a thread here in the Central Library where new members can make themselves known, and be properly welcomed. It would be good if you could just introduce yourself, and let us know what sort of books you enjoy etc.

looking forward to seeing your thoughts in the various forums.

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Starting - Cat's Cradle - Kurt Vonnegut - to break into my recent graphic novel splurge. Having said that I'm loving Akira at the moment, regardless of format it's a brilliant story.

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Having reached the end of my Pete McCarthy audiobook, I've now moved onto my first book by the entirely unrelated Cormac McCarthy, "No Country for Old Men".

 

From what I know of Cormac McCarthy, his themes and style ought to be right up my street, and judging from the first disc this seems to be true.

 

Also wanted to read this when I heard it was to be the next film by the very great Coen brothers. I believe its just premiered at Cannes so it can't be long before it hits cinemas here.

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Cormac McCarthy, "No Country for Old Men".

 

From what I know of Cormac McCarthy, his themes and style ought to be right up my street, and judging from the first disc this seems to be true.

 

Also wanted to read this when I heard it was to be the next film by the very great Coen brothers. I believe its just premiered at Cannes so it can't be long before it hits cinemas here.

 

I have this on my wishlist. It looks very good as does the film. From what I have seen of it - Josh Brolin looks excellent.

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Starting - Cat's Cradle - Kurt Vonnegut - to break into my recent graphic novel splurge. Having said that I'm loving Akira at the moment, regardless of format it's a brilliant story.
How strange - I turned on the radio just as I was reading your post......Harry Chapin - Cat's in the Cradle is playing. Spooky!!:scared:

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Finished Middlemarch and just started a Dutch Book by Jessica Durlacher called Het Geweten (english:The Conscience, but it hasn't been translated). Jessica Durlacher is the wife of Leon de Winter, one of the most famous Dutch authors and she received the prize for best new novelist in 1998 for this.

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I'm currently reading The Tenderness Of Wolves, by Stef Penney. I hoped I would enjoy it, but so far it has exceeded all expectations, and I absolutely love it.

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