Jump to content
Abbynormal92243

Currently Reading

Recommended Posts

Struggling just now with My Name Is Leon by Kit de Waal. I loved it at first, but it doesn't seem to be developing much, and I'm getting bored. I can't find a thread to see if others liked it (but I can never get our search facility to turn up what I want).

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 13/08/2018 at 10:24, Minxminnie said:

Struggling just now with My Name Is Leon by Kit de Waal. I loved it at first, but it doesn't seem to be developing much, and I'm getting bored. I can't find a thread to see if others liked it (but I can never get our search facility to turn up what I want).

 

 

That's disappointing to hear, I've heard a lot about it

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
10 hours ago, iff said:

 

 

That's disappointing to hear, I've heard a lot about it

It's probably just me. I carried on after I posted that and the plot did move on suddenly, so I got interested again. It is good, though I am a bit weary of stories from the perspective of children just now. It's in third person though, which helps.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I finished The Peculiar Life of a Lonely Postman.  The ending twist was odd, and didn't really work for me -- but I didn't see it coming!  I was imagining a bunch of other scenarios.

 

Next up is Rupert Everett's second autobiography, Vanished Years

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Finished Lissa Evans’ Old Baggage. Rated that one for 4 out of 5. It was a slow burner, and it wasn’t as near as Crooked Heart, which I loved. But it's a good read.

 

Starting The Buddha in the Attic by Julie Otsuka.

Edited by Marie H

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Finished -The Outsider by Stephen King. The first half was very exciting, but the second half turned into a Famous Five for adults. Disappointing and confusing ending.

 

Started - The Tartar Steppe - short story by D. Buzzati.

Edited by Loretta

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Reading A Very Unimportant Officer; Life and Death on the Somme and at Passchendaele. The book is starting well.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Perfect Silence  by Helen Fields - the fourth book in her crime series set in Edinburgh, one of my most favourite series of books.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hazel, I've started reading Perfect Silence and there is gore aplenty,  just hope they get the murdering evil person before too many people end carved up. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 03/09/2018 at 12:41, lunababymoonchild said:

 

Would be interested in what you think of this

Well so far, so good.  I've only read the first chapter but it's an easy read.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 8/31/2018 at 05:07, momac said:

Hazel, I've started reading Perfect Silence and there is gore aplenty,  just hope they get the murdering evil person before too many people end carved up. 

: ) It was a particularly gory outing for Callanach and Taylor!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The Grip of It by Jac Jemc  - odd little square formatted book about a possessed house. So far it reminds me of Amityville.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

To Your Eternity #1 by Yoshitoki Oima.

Beautiful with starkness in plot and illustrations.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 01/10/2018 at 14:21, Onion Budgie said:

It's murder mystery season! (for me, anyway) -- so I'm about to make a start on The Mysterious Affair at Styles by Agatha Christie.

 

Wouldn’t mind reading that myself, but after reading the blurb I’ve got a sneaking suspicion I’ve watched the tv version. I’lol need to look into it more.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Just started The Screwtape Letters - C.S. Lewis.

Letters from senior devil, uncle Screwtape, to his nephew Wormood, a junior devil.

 

 

Edited by Loretta

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Am really immersed in 1930's fiction about how families survived rationing, the blitz and life in general for the ordinary folk who seemed to have numerous children, very little money, husbands who spent much time in the pub, but overall a great sense of community.  The conditions of the poorer people were shocking but somehow they seemed to survive and the upper class continued on their way with nary a thought for the working or unemployed folk.  But all through their trials, lack of food, loss of homes and agonizing loss of loved ones, their patriotism was strong.  Sad reading much of it but the courage of the people was incredible.

 

Just to be clear, it's about the 1930's but currently written.

 

Edited by momac

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Loading...

×
×
  • Create New...