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Sounds interesting Ting - I've met a few people who seem to delight in the negative, hard to know how to respond.

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I started both of my new Christmas books on Christmas day - The Glimpse of Truth, 100 of the finest short stories ever written, selected and introduced by David Miller and Tales of the Marvellous and News of the Strange translated by Michael C Lyons. Just as well they're short stories! Still with War and Peace and (have I gone mad?) have picked up The Elements of Eloquence that I last picked up last January.

Edited by lunababymoonchild

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I'm reading The Black Spider by Jeremias Gotthelf. It's a struggle and it is only 100 pages long! Has anyone else read it? It is for a book group read so I will finish it. I am hoping it gets better!

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I am reading The Gone-Away World by Nick Harkaway, a Christmas present from my husband, recommended to him by a co-worker who also reads a lot, but I don't think we always like the same things.  I'm 81/574 of the way through and I think I'll like it.  But it's odd.  Also, when I searched for it on BGO, it was the subject of several spams that we received.  Not quite sure why, although I think it's possible it started it's life as an epub book.

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As RG is working virtually all week this week and I am off for most of it I have finally decided to give Middlemarch by Goerge Eliot a go. Our daughter left her old copy of the novel on our bookshelf when she moved out and there it has stayed for a number of years as I was a bit put off by the length of it. I started reading the book a couple of days ago but the book is so big and the print so small I found it less than easy to read. I have since transfered to my Kindle and am getting on much better. Usually if the actual book is available I prefer to read that but in this case my Kindle has come in very handy. According to the notes on my Kindle I am 13% of my way through! Although the book took a little while to get going I am really enjoying it now. Hopefully it will be worth the effort!

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Sounds interesting Ting - I've met a few people who seem to delight in the negative, hard to know how to respond.

 

I had a brainwave on that, momac. Next time my miserable, well-off  neighbour weighs in with her 'these poor people suffering so much' theme, instead of reasoning with her I will simply say: "You're probably right. What are you going to do about it?" I have no idea what the result will be.  :) 

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I had a brainwave on that, momac. Next time my miserable, well-off  neighbour weighs in with her 'these poor people suffering so much' theme, instead of reasoning with her I will simply say: "You're probably right. What are you going to do about it?" I have no idea what the result will be.  :)

 

Sounds like the perfect answer Ting although she may get a bit defensive.  Worth a try anyway.

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I had a brainwave on that, momac. Next time my miserable, well-off  neighbour weighs in with her 'these poor people suffering so much' theme, instead of reasoning with her I will simply say: "You're probably right. What are you going to do about it?" I have no idea what the result will be.  :)

 

Do keep us informed

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After two or three novels I was yearning for some non-fiction.  I'm reading, therefore, 'The Ark Before Noah:Decoding the Story of the Flood' having seen a programme on BBC some time ago about Irving Finkel, a curator at the British Museum and a world authority on ancient Mesopotamia.  He had found himself in a detective story of decipherment and discovery when an ancient tablet revealed a new version of the Babylonian Flood Story.

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I'm starting 2015 the way i left 2014, with one of Josephine Tey's Inspector Grant novels. This one is To Love and be Wise, the fourth in the series.

It sits between The Franchise Affair and The Daughter of Time, which are the most well known, and probably the best of them.

 

I have two still to read, The Singing Sands, the last in the series, already waiting on the bookshelf and The Man in the Queue, just ordered from Amazon for 1p, plus P&P.

There are 23 years between their publishing dates, so I'll be interested to see how different they are.  Or not.

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Finished Away by Amy Bloom yesterday, having read this over the Christmas period, for my local library RG.  So last night I started Angle of Repose by Wallace Stegner, which has been sitting on my TBR pile for a few months now.  Oh, the joy of getting back to his exquisite prose.

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Just started Gone Girl by Gillian Flynn.  Only became aware of this book following, I suspect, its re-release after the film late last year, which I didn't see.  I have heard that the film is very good, if not excellent, so I am hoping that the book is too.

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Last month I read This Boy, Alan Johnson's memoir of his childhood. This month I've started reading this year's early entries for The Quagga Prize 2015, worthy independents but rather less compelling.

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History Of The Rain by Niall Williams, yet another Irish novel for me. It was shortlisted for the 2014 Booker and has appeared on many "books that got away" lists so I was curious. It's sweet and lyrical. The young girl narrating the story of her father loves literature and throughout the book there are references to books and poetry, a device which is catnip to a BGO person. 

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While I wait for the next batch of O'Brian's I have started 'Friend of the Devil', by Peter Robinson. It's an Inspector Banks novel - and I only know it from the TV series. No idea what it'll be like.

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After the wonderful After The Fire, a Still Small Voice by Evie Wyld, I fancied a book by a totally new author to me. Been doing some research in online reviews and strangely enough one of the books on my list was also the fiction book of the month in my local Waterstones when I nipped in the other day. So bought it.

Station Eleven by Emily St. John Mandel.  http://www.amazon.co.uk/Station-Eleven-Emily-John-Mandel/dp/1447268962

Got a lot of good reviews by papers I read and authors I like. Christopher Priest gives a gushing review in his blog. http://www.christopher-priest.co.uk/  "Her novel is complex, subtle, wise, beautifully written, layered, original and often moving. I cannot commend it more highly." 

Just started and loved the first chapter. I'm a sucker for a good post apocalyptic novel. :)

Edited by Clavain

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Gosh... I think I must have nodded off!

 

I am currently re-reading the Pentecost Family books by Eric Malpass.  Very light reading, but entertaining.  Almost finished the 3rd, "Fortinbras Has Escaped."

 

When travelling, I am listening to Robert Jordan's "Eye of the World" (unabridged).  Having read the book twice, I am now starting to pick up on some of the important points that I missed on those occasions.

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Clavain - I recently read Station Eleven and enjoyed it very much so I hope you will too.

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I have three that I am currently reading.

 

The book I carry around in my bag is: The Great Influenza by John Barry

The book I have next to the bed is: The First Man in Rome by Colleen McCullough

The book I have in the bathroom is:  The Gulag Archipelago, Parts 1 & II by Aleksandr Solzhenitsyn

 

I have had The Great Influenza and The Gulag Archipelago on my bookshelf for years.  I finally decided to dust them off and start from scratch at reading them again.   The First Man in Rome just showed up.  I've made the least progress there and I think I might make it my bring on the airplane book too.   The Great Influenza is great to read a chapter at a time.  The Gulag is heavy and so it is the perfect bathroom book because I can only get through 3-5 pages before I want to put it down again.

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Yeah - got the next three Aubrey-Maturin novels, so have started on #4 Mauritius Command. Since I have visited - and scuba dived off - said island, I am 'looking forward' as we say here.

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I seem to have three books on the go at the moment!

The audiobook of Trollope's Can You Forgive Her?

 

Drowning Ruth, by Christina Shwartz for picking up in odd moments, and reading in waiting rooms. I have no idea why this was amongst my TBR collection. I thought it was because it got glowing reports from BGO readers, but i've checked, and that is far from the case :confused:

 

And, because it is a collection of very short essays (some just a paragraph long) which I can just dip into at bedtime, Nigel Slater's musings on the food we English enjoy/remember from our past, Eating For England

 

I am hoping this heralds the end of my long reading drought.

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I seem to have three books on the go at the moment!

The audiobook of Trollope's Can You Forgive Her?

 

Drowning Ruth, by Christina Shwartz for picking up in odd moments, and reading in waiting rooms. I have no idea why this was amongst my TBR collection. I thought it was because it got glowing reports from BGO readers, but i've checked, and that is far from the case :confused:

 

And, because it is a collection of very short essays (some just a paragraph long) which I can just dip into at bedtime, Nigel Slater's musings on the food we English enjoy/remember from our past, Eating For England

 

I am hoping this heralds the end of my long reading drought.

I hope so too, meg. Nothing worse for a reader than not being able to read. Or being too sick to read.

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