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The Shining Girls by Lauren Beukes ( very cheap on Kindle at the moment :) ). Bought it in hardback, after reading Zoo City ( also cheap on Amazon and good ) but never got round to reading it.

About a quarter way through and definitely a change of direction from my previous read. Enjoying - looking like a fantasy horror, very Stephen Kingish but early days

Edited by Clavain
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Just started the last of The Barchester series, The last Chronicle of Barset by Anthony Trollope. I have been reading the series for a while and have loved them all. I am not looking forward to finishing the series but am beginning to think that when I do I really need to read a few more modern books for a while. If I am not careful I will start to belive that I really do know the characters that have peopled the books!

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Another book I would probably not have thought to pick up prior to BGO, and one which seems to garner so many positive comments, just about thirty pages or so into Atonement by Ian McEwan.

CP reckons it is one of her favourite books; remember a few years back watching the film with CP and enjoying it, so hope to do so just as much with the book.

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Record for me, started yesterday and finished today 'Death in a Strange Country' by Donna Leon.  Very easy reading. Loved this quote: "In the driveway two bicycles lay, one beside the other, with the complete abandon that only bicycles could achieve."

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Loved this quote: "In the driveway two bicycles lay, one beside the other, with the complete abandon that only bicycles could achieve."

Brings back memories Ting. When I was about ten years old, a school-friend and myself left our bikes on the driveway at our house in just such a state of abandon, whereupon my Dad reversed the car over them! My friend walked home. Happy Days!!!   :yup:

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I am very grateful to BGO as RG keeps going through the bookshelves and picking out old favourites of mine. Brideshead and Atonement within a short space of time! So lovely to be able to have a chance of a good natter about books so close to home at last. Maybe if we ever do get the chance to retire we may now stand a chance of having something to talk about!

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Just started Him and Me by Michael and Jack Whitehall.  I thought it would be a lot funnier than it is which is why I'm not recommending it as yet for the BGO read on humour.  On the other hand I was laughing out loud in bed last night when I read about how Michael got stuck in a child's chair on parents night!!

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I have embarked on War and Peace, Leo Tolstoy.

I read this when i was 15 and should have been revising for my mocks (I did surprisingly well so score 1 to Mr Tolstoy).  I absolutely loved it, it's one of the few books where I can still remember most of the plot, even small details, even scenes, paragraphs and phrases.  Whereas when I reread Anna Karenina for the book group recently I'd forgotten most of it.

 

The downsides to the book are the battle scenes and the bits with masonic ritual which go on a bit but you can let your eye slide..., the upside is everything else: the characters, the scale, the story....

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Very ambitious Luna but probably interesting - haven't read it myself.  :)

 

 

 

I read this when i was 15 and should have been revising for my mocks (I did surprisingly well so score 1 to Mr Tolstoy).  I absolutely loved it, it's one of the few books where I can still remember most of the plot, even small details, even scenes, paragraphs and phrases.  Whereas when I reread Anna Karenina for the book group recently I'd forgotten most of it.

 

The downsides to the book are the battle scenes and the bits with masonic ritual which go on a bit but you can let your eye slide..., the upside is everything else: the characters, the scale, the story....

I'm enjoying it so far but I'm only 20 pages in as yet. It just felt like the right time to read this.

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I read this when i was 15 and should have been revising for my mocks (I did surprisingly well so score 1 to Mr Tolstoy).  I absolutely loved it, it's one of the few books where I can still remember most of the plot, even small details, even scenes, paragraphs and phrases.  Whereas when I reread Anna Karenina for the book group recently I'd forgotten most of it.

 

The downsides to the book are the battle scenes and the bits with masonic ritual which go on a bit but you can let your eye slide..., the upside is everything else: the characters, the scale, the story....

 

I also just adored War and Peace and only sort of liked Anna Karenina.  I actually even loved the battle scenes.  I read it while on break from college and remember that I had to ask my mother if there were something shocking about being a Mason because the ones I knew didn't seem so scandalous.  

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Just started Him and Me by Michael and Jack Whitehall.  I thought it would be a lot funnier than it is which is why I'm not recommending it as yet for the BGO read on humour.  On the other hand I was laughing out loud in bed last night when I read about how Michael got stuck in a child's chair on parents night!!

Actually, it is really funny in parts - laugh-out -loud funny.  Still not adding to our list for the group read because there are so many good ones already.

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Have just started The Long Way Home by Louise Penny, an Inspector Gamache novel. He is is now retired from the Surete du Quebec and lives in the delightful village of Three Pines in Quebec. Louise Penny has a wonderful way of describing the village and the villagers and it sounds so cosy at their Friday night barbecues at the home of Inspector Gamache that it makes you wish you were there. However we know that something untoward is going to happen to upset the serenity of this little patch of heaven. Louise Penny is a really clever writer.

Edited by momac
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Started "Disgrace" by J.M.Coetzee after finishing Atonement earlier this week.  Had not realized this won the Booker Prize in 1999, it was simply something I grabbed off the shelf at home before leaving for our week away.  I think CP must have got me to order it goodness knows when, she's never read it.  No surprise there then, one of many!

 

It's certainly not a long book, in fact I will probably finish it later today, but I have found it so far to be quite an enthralling read.  It's a book that deals with moral outlooks, cultural differences in a country struggling to come to terms with its own identity, relationships and political correctness, with a touch of Romantic literature thrown in.

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