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Momac, I saw these in Waterstones today. The single volume of three books was indeed difficult to handle if you have manual dexterity problems - as I have, but only one of my thumbs - however, the two book volume was fine (much smaller than the Ken Follet) and the single volume book 3 an ordinary paper book size.

 

Thanks Luna, if I'm lucky book 3 will be separate - it didn't specify on Amazon that the books were all in the one volume, I just assumed they were all in one the way it was listed - I can always hope. :rolleyes:

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I'm half way through Property by Valerie Martin and am being blown away.

Its a very good read.

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A second reading of Frankenstein by Mary Shelley - one of the books I finally managed to download onto my Kobo from Project Gutenberg, after the original teething problems.

Unlike the Penguin Popular Classics edition which I read some years ago this version does not have the "Author's Introduction to the Standard Novels Edition", nor the 1818 Preface by Percy Bysshe Shelley .

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I also seem to have picked up Frankenstein.  Reading the ebook I bought which is the 1818 original 'uncensored' version.  Also have the same paperback (insofaras it's the 1818 version) which is Oxford World Classics.  Two books at once, I'll see how that goes.

Edited by lunababymoonchild

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Its a very good read.

I absolutely loved Property though when I looked up what other people thought it seemed to be a bit of a Marmite book.  Never mind, didn't alter whaat I thought.

 

Currently reading The Penelopiad by Magaret Atwood.

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Halfway through "The Cuckoo's Calling", by Robert Galbraith, aka J K Rowling.  It is riveting. The characters are so interesting that I don't really care whodunit; I keep looking forward to the next bit of character backstory.

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Trying to catch up with Seamus Heaney reading Beowulf on Radio 4.  Missed the first 2 episodes but so far have heard 3 and 4.

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I'm currently reading books on the Vietnam war and also some of the Navy Seal books - actually had read one which seems very much like the plot of the recently released movie, Captain Phillips.  I don't seem drawn at all to the deeper literary books and I wonder if the 'literary' part of me is lacking.  Does anyone else read books other than the 'good' novels?  I'm always pleased when there is a BGO read as it's usually something I wouldn't have picked out for myself but books like "Bring Up The Bodies" and "The Luminaries" aren't books I would read by choice only if they were part of the 'read', both books I have on Kindle and keep wondering if I should give them another try. :thinking:  Then again, Dracula, was an interesting and readable book and I believe it is considered a classic in its genre.  Maybe Grasshopper has a good point about qualifying 'literature' on another thread - I think that was the gist of her comment.  Correct me if I'm wrong Grasshopper.

Edited by momac

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I'm currently reading books on the Vietnam war and also some of the Navy Seal books - actually had read one which seems very much like the plot of the recently released movie, Captain Phillips.  I don't seem drawn at all to the deeper literary books and I wonder if the 'literary' part of me is lacking.  Does anyone else read books other than the 'good' novels?  I'm always pleased when there is a BGO read as it's usually something I wouldn't have picked out for myself but books like "Bring Up The Bodies" and "The Luminaries" aren't books I would read by choice only if they were part of the 'read', both books I have on Kindle and keep wondering if I should give them another try. :thinking:  Then again, Dracula, was an interesting and readable book and I believe it is considered a classic in its genre.  Maybe Grasshopper has a good point about qualifying 'literature' on another thread - I think that was the gist of her comment.  Correct me if I'm wrong Grasshopper.

In my opinion, read what you like. The literary merits are not that important. I have read some rubbish in my time - and enjoyed it - and will do so again, I dare say. I think that this helps to refine my tastes and also helps me to recognise and differentiate 'good' and 'bad' writing. I'm very much enjoying Dracula but my next read may well be The Mallen series by Catherine Cookson, hardly literary but I love the story so will read it again. Then again my next book could easily be The Godfather, Mario Puzo, which I love. Should I be reading Proust? Probably, but you don't have to improve your mind with every book you read and it's a hobby, you're supposed to enjoy it.

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Well, next on my TBR list is the Booker shortlist, but the book I have enjoyed the most over the past six months is Jo Jo Moyes' Me Before You, which is total chicklit, though with a heart.

 

I think the thing about BGO is that there is room for all!

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Thanks Luna and MM - and Luna, you're right, reading is a hobby and is for enjoyment.  

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Thanks Luna and MM - and Luna, you're right, reading is a hobby and is for enjoyment.  

I completely agree. 

 

I've made a start on book 8 in Robert Jordan's Wheel of Time saga, Path of Daggers.  It seems to pick up at a point about 2 hours before book 7 ended but with a different set of characters, which means the reader knows what's about to happen, but not how it will affect the people involved.  A clever device which (unusually for Jordan) means there is incredible tension for the reader right from the start.

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My new audiobook is Terry Pratchett and Stephen Baxter's The Long Earth. Not especially literary in many people's eyes.

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I am reading Consider the Fork by Bee Wilson, which is a welcome relief from the ravages of Hurricane Katrina.

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..............................  Maybe Grasshopper has a good point about qualifying 'literature' on another thread - I think that was the gist of her comment.  Correct me if I'm wrong Grasshopper.

 

Yes, Momac, I was having another little rant at the frequent use of literary when  best/favourite novels/fiction comes up, but I should expect it from The Guardian.  Will stop being  Grumpy Old Woman in this respect as it is pretty trivial. It is  happily obvious  that on BGO it doesn't matter as long as we enjoy what we are reading, though  I did notice on another thread a definition of the dreaded word I heartily endorse -

 

Thank you My Friend Jack 

 

..... So I looked it up and discovered that "literary fiction" is also known as "mainstream fiction."  And "mainstream fiction" is anything that sells well. ..............

 

Of course, the OED sells well.............................................. :naughty:

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I'm glad to know that I can read mainstream fiction and not feel bad about leaving Proust for some other time - a reference to a post by Luna which I liked. Hi Grasshopper - is Ting still there with you?

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Hi Grasshopper - is Ting still there with you?

Yes Momac it is lovely to have her here for a while and she is enjoying having uninterrupted internet access for a change so she can catch up with BGO and other sites without the net crashing down for hours or even days. Also a few friends and family to catch up with so we are having quite a social time. :)

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Have just finished "Cloudstreet" by Tim Wilton, the doorstop story of two Australian families living together in a mildly haunted house. It's not something I want to read again, not because I don't think it's great. More because it left me emotionally punch drunk! A mini-series has been made, but I won't be watching, because I am happy with my own imagination. I have now collapsed into "Weekend Wodehouse".

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I'm about halfway through Tracy Chevalier's The Last Runaway.

Enjoying it a lot, though it is more about frontier life and not so much about the Underground Railway, as the blurb implied.

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Have just finished "Cloudstreet" by Tim Wilton, the doorstop story of two Australian families living together in a mildly haunted house. It's not something I want to read again, not because I don't think it's great. More because it left me emotionally punch drunk! A mini-series has been made, but I won't be watching, because I am happy with my own imagination. I have now collapsed into "Weekend Wodehouse".quite

 

Tim Winton's novels subsequent to this one are  quite different.  I found 'Cloudstreet' very much in the traditional family saga mode but his later writing is much more finessed and 'modern'.

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Tim Winton's novels subsequent to this one are  quite different.  I found 'Cloudstreet' very much in the traditional family saga mode but his later writing is much more finessed and 'modern'.

I'm definitely game to try another!

 

Currently reading Terry Pratchett "Wee Free Men". There's something about a Scottish accent ... :hmm:

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Just curious if anyone is planning to read any of the books I posted on the recently acquired thread? I would really enjoy doing informal book discussion groups with some of you folks. Maybe I could start a TBR thread (unless one exists already; I couldn't find one) and we could synchronize books? Most of the posts I see on books I'm reading are old. It would be really fun to talk them up as I'm reading them.

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Dan,

We welcome people reviving old threads - old threads never die! That's probably the best way to initiate discussion of particular books. Often, it just takes one person posting on an older thread to revive a whole discussion.

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