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Just started The Riders by Tim Winton. I've had it on the TBR for a while, having picked it up in a sale a while back. I'd never heard of it before, so I was surprised to see it was the 1995 Booker winner. I'm enjoying it so far.

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Jonathan Franzen's Freedom - question is, do I take the publisher up on their offer of a replacement (correct) copy or finish it first? What a dilemma.

Mine came pretty smartish - you wouldn't have to wait more than a couple of days. Would it be torture, though?

 

I can't wait to start mine but going away on Wednesday and don't want to lug a huge tome around so I'm pretending it isn't in the house at all and waiting until I get back - unless I weaken.

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In between my Shirley Jackson collection, I have started reading Drawing on the Right Side of the Brain by Betty Edwards.

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I made a start on Stalingrad last night, but only managed a couple of pages as I found it too heavy to read in bed.

I think I might put it back on the shelf and borrow the 14CD audiobook from the library - probably towards the middle of December when I will be chained to the kitchen stove ;)

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After a fortnight - a FORTNIGHT? - of not being in any frame of mind to read anything (and believe me I tried) I have finally broken my reading drought with John Le Carre's The Spy Who Came in from the Cold. I'm about a third of the way through and not entirely sure what's going on but enjoying it anyway.

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Almost finished Far from the Madding Crowd by Hardy - second time of reading in a decade - and loving it more the second time around.

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I made a start on Stalingrad last night, but only managed a couple of pages as I found it too heavy to read in bed.

I think I might put it back on the shelf and borrow the 14CD audiobook from the library - probably towards the middle of December when I will be chained to the kitchen stove ;)

 

What you need, Meg, is the handy book holder designed by The Apprentice candidates a couple of weeks back :-)

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Living the dream about Susan Boyle. I can well understand how she became pressured. She was asked to change so much as the TV companies did not like her frumpy dressing.

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Having given up on Stalingrad due to its bulk, I have gone to the opposite extreme, and my next book is to be The Visitor by Maeve Brennan, which is only 80 pages long including Foreword and Editor's Note.

 

I sought out this little book as a result of a couple of enthusiastic reviews on BGO three years ago, but mislaid it and then forgot all about it. I guess the slimness of its spine attracted my eye today. ;)

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my next book is to be The Visitor by Maeve Brennan, ...

I sought out this little book as a result of a couple of enthusiastic reviews on BGO three years ago

Oooh, I liked that book, megustaleer, hope you enjoy it. I bought Brennan's collection, The Rose Garden, after it and haven't got round to it yet. Maybe you'll prompt me to pick it up.

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Stone's Fall by Iain Pears - fab so far. It's about a journalist who's hired to write a biog of an industrialist who's just died, but the trick is the story begins with his death, then is split into four parts, each detailing an earlier part of his life - going backwards.

 

Its style does remind me of The Instance of the Fingerpost by Pears which told the same story from four different viewpoints. That was ace, I'm hoping this continues to impress.

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Although I'm having to give priority to my academic reading, I'm still attending my monthly book group and, as we normally read on themes rather than individual books, I'm trying to find things I might be able to do some justice to i.e. short stuff.

 

Our meeting for September was slightly unusual because we did all read the same book, "To Kill A Mockingbird" which was as awesome as I remember it being when I had to read it when I was at university the first time around.

 

I didn't touch my October book, Wells Tower's debut, the short story collection "Everything Ravaged, Everything Burned". I will get around to it one day after reading leyla's review here.

 

Our theme for November, however, is home territory, Jewish fiction, inspired by Howard Jacobson's Man Booker victory. It's an ideal excuse to indulge in the short short stories of Israeli genius Etgar Keret. I've already read six of the 46 stories in "Missing Kissinger" (about 25 pages in total) and so far these are as lovably, touchingly bonkers as his previous efforts, but there is a much darker streak, inviting comparison with Shalom Auslander's "Beware of God", albeit much more secular in outlook.

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Following up a recommendation (on librarything) I'm reading one of Andrea Camilleri's Inspector Montalbano mysteries, The Snack Thief. To read a mystery like this and burst out laughing over breakfast is by no means a common phenomenon in this household. Another one is on order at the library. Great stuff.

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Following up a recommendation (on librarything) I'm reading one of Andrea Camilleri's Inspector Montalbano mysteries, The Snack Thief. To read a mystery like this and burst out laughing over breakfast is by no means a common phenomenon in this household. Another one is on order at the library. Great stuff.

 

Hello Chuntzy,

Thanks for the heads up on this. Would you recommend doing what they say on Amazon and read the shape of Water and the Terra-Cotta Dog first? I watched Mastermind on Friday and some bloke on there was answering questions on Malcolm Pryce's Aberystwyth novels, and based on that I might try those as well.

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I've just started Theory of War by Joan Brady.

This is a re-read, as it was one of my postal book group books 15 years ago. It returned to the sender afterwards, but remained in my mind as a 'must read again' book.

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