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restored (original page 30)

 

2nd August 2006, 07:25 PM

 

Flingo

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Working my way through all those library books I have now renewed to their limit - but currently am reading Tamar by Mal Peet (this years Carnegie winner) as that cannot be renewed either as it has requests on it!

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42nd August 2006, 09:58 PM

 

Momo

Subscriber and Permanent Resident

Originally Posted by megustaleer

I really enjoyed Longitude, but I've been reluctant to try anything else by Dava Sobel. in case I'm disappointed!

I will let you know how I liked Galileo's Daughter but I cannot compare it to Longitude. Maybe someone in my book club has read both and can tell me whether there is a difference.

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Grammath

Subscriber and Founder Member

 

Started "We Need to Talk About Kevin" on audiobook this morning.

 

For some reason "The Well of Lost Plots" is taking me ages, which is odd 'cos I raced through the first two Thursday Next novels.

 

I need to be reading Graham Swift's "Last Orders" for my RL group which meets next week but I haven't started it yet. Looks a quick read, though.

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23rd August 2006, 01:26 PM

 

megustaleer

Moderator

Originally Posted by Grammath

I need to be reading Graham Swift's "Last Orders" for my RL group which meets next week but I haven't started it yet. Looks a quick read, though.

It's not too demanding! If you start a thread when you've finished, I'll contribute a line.

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megustaleer

Moderator

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I have just finished reading Gilead by Marilynne Robinson. I will take a day or two to enjoy the peace and calm that it weaves around the reader before returning to The Children's War.

 

I don't think I could find two books more diametrically opposed in their themes and treatment as these two.

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Hazel

Subscriber and Resident

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I am reading Northanger Abbey just now for next year's uni, but I seem to be also going through a reading block. I am enjoying the book immensely, and it is terribly funny, it's just that it has unfortunately coincided with a reading block. I just can't motivate myself to read just now. After some 50 books this year, maybe I am finally worn out.

 

 

On the plus side I watched Steve Martin's Shopgirl last night and it reaffirmed my faith in 'good movies' - so I have ordered the book from Amazon, via the appropriate link Bill!

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#442 *

25th August 2006, 07:31 PM

Lady Lazarus

Founder Member

 

I loved Last Orders. A quick read but can be hard to keep up with who is the narrator!

Originally Posted by Grammath

I need to be reading Graham Swift's "Last Orders" for my RL group which meets next week but I haven't started it yet. Looks a quick read, though.

I've just finished the Blind Assassin, and am now halfway through Brick Lane by Monica Ali. Really enjoying it so far.

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#443 *

26th August 2006, 07:20 AM

SlowRain

Member

Originally Posted by Lady Lazarus

I've just finished the Blind Assassin...

 

I have had that one kicking around for a while. I've never read Atwood before. Without giving anything away, what did you think of the book? Is there anything I should be aware of, regarding her style or anything else, before I start it?

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megustaleer

Moderator

 

 

There is a thread on The Blind Assassin in 21st century fiction

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26th August 2006, 10:16 AM

Lady Lazarus

Founder Member

Originally Posted by SlowRain

I have had that one kicking around for a while. I've never read Atwood before. Without giving anything away, what did you think of the book? Is there anything I should be aware of, regarding her style or anything else, before I start it?

OK I'll post what I think of it in the Blind Assassin thread.... I did like it tho!

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* #446 *

27th August 2006, 12:09 PM

katrina

Permanent Resident

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I started Ella Minnow Pea last night, we'll have to see how I get on, I'm not all to sure about the writing style at the moment

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August 2006, 02:02 PM

 

Hazel

Subscriber and Resident

Originally Posted by katrina

I started Ella Minnow Pea last night, we'll have to see how I get on, I'm not all to sure about the writing style at the moment

Hopefully you will get used to it, EMP is a really wonderful book which I was sad to finish.

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27th August 2006, 03:20 PM

katrina

Permanent Resident

 

Finished Ella Minnow Pea, took no time and grew to like it. Going to start In the Country of Men next and a kids book, Fly By Night by Frances Hardinge

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Flingo

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Going to read a book recommended on here a long time ago - not

sure who by, but it was a recommendation from "a nice man at the library". The book - The Ecstacy Club by Douglas Rushkoff.

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0th August 2006, 07:50 AM

 

Paul

Subscriber

 

Finished the Jonathan Safran Foer book 'Extremely Loud and Incredibly Close' -- parts of it were really good (the 9 year old Oskar) and some of the early flashbacks a little confusing, I'm going to have a think about it - my initial reaction is mixed.

 

I've moved onto the latest David Peace book 'The Damned Utd' - its had some good reviews - written from the perspective of football manager Brian Clough and his 44 days in charge of Leeds United. As a Leeds fan it obviously has an added interest ... but its reviews have been encouraging even from non football fans. I'm going to 'TRY' and be impartial! Picked it up last night, and I read the first 20 pages or so and a good pace...so I'll see.

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restored (original page 33)

 

Hazel

Subscriber and Resident

I have started upon Marcus Sedgwick's My Swordhand Is Singing, I know I should be reading something 19thC, but I can't be bothered. I juts want to do my last essay of the year then move onto the 19thC novels. Anyway, C&YA books are a easy diversion, and I do love a good vampire book.

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11th September 2006, 08:58 PM

katrina

Permanent Resident

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As everyone seems to have loved Fingersmith I'm really shocked we haven't got a thread, I've only got 100 pages to go, so i'll start one and it would be cool to hear what people have to say. I know many people would have read it a long time ago, but its excellent.

 

Hazel would be good to hear about that Marcus Sedwick book, I read The Foreshadowing by him earlier this year, and it was a good read.

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14th September 2006, 05:43 PM

katrina

Permanent Resident

 

Just about to start The Ballad of Lee Cotton by Christopher Wilson, a read spurred by Mungus' post about it, its got a hard act to follow as I just finished Fingersmith which I loved

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th September 2006, 07:04 PM

 

Hazel

Subscriber and Resident

Originally Posted by katrina

Hazel would be good to hear about that Marcus Sedwick book, I read The Foreshadowing by him earlier this year, and it was a good read.

Will dutifully post a thread Kat!

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h September 2006, 07:14 PM

 

Mungus

Subscriber

Originally Posted by katrina

Just about to start The Ballad of Lee Cotton by Christopher Wilson, a read spurred by Mungus' post about it, its got a hard act to follow as I just finished Fingersmith which I loved

 

That is a tough one to follow, but I'm confident!

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Momo

Subscriber and Permanent Resident

 

Finally received my copy of A Change of Regime and started reading it right away. I'm not going to be home this weekend but hope to have at least some time to read. Can't wait to see how Peter, Zosia and all the others are doing.

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17th September 2006, 06:17 PM

jebbie74

Founder Member

*

I recently finished reading a copy of Water For Elephants by Sara Gruen that was loaned to me by a friend from work. I have been raving about what a great book this was since I have put it down! I finished it in just under a day (and it was a workday, too!) Now, my only problem is that every book I start doesn't keep my interest because that loast book was just too good!

 

In the meantime, I am trying to plod through Blood Eagle by Craig Russell and quite frankly it's not doing much for me either.

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ptember 2006, 07:26 AM

 

Paul

Subscriber

*I've finished The Handmaids Tale by Margaret Atwood and thought this an excellent novel.

 

Just moved onto Brick Lane by Monica Ali...

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Hazel

Subscriber and Resident

 

Currently reading Damnation Street by Andrew Klavan. His Don't Say A Word is one of my all time favourite crime novels - so excited about this one.

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ptember 2006, 09:42 AM

 

donnae

Subscriber

 

Just finished Ella Minnow Pea, which I really enjoyed. Now reading another C&YA book, Shade's Children by Garth Nix. Only a couple of chapters in, but it is looking good.

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#491 *

19th September 2006, 09:49 AM

Caroley

Member

 

Hi everyone,

 

I'm currently 45 pages into 'my best friend's girl' by Dorothy Koomson. Thoroughly enjoying it so far....

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Grammath

Subscriber and Founder Member

 

My new audiobook, started in the traffic jams of north London this morning, is Zoë Heller's "Notes on a Scandal".

 

Following on from "We Need to Talk About Kevin", I'm a bit worried that two books about troubles with teenagers might be a bit too much.

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19th September 2006, 02:00 PM

yorkshire rose

Member

 

I've just started 'Rifling Paradise' by Jem Poster. The Times said 'immediately gripping' ...and I'm gripped!

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th September 2006, 07:13 PM

 

Flingo

Subscriber and Permanent Resident

Originally Posted by Grammath

My new audiobook, started in the traffic jams of north London this morning, is Zoë Heller's "Notes on a Scandal".

 

Following on from "We Need to Talk About Kevin", I'm a bit worried that two books about troubles with teenagers might be a bit too much.

Interestingly, this is my next RL book group choice. Not chosen because of the links with Kevin (our July choice), but I might have to make some comments to that effect! Thanks, Gram!

 

I started I'm the King of the Castle by Susan Hill last night, as a result of Meg's and others recommendations. I'll let you know what I thought when done.

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#495 *

20th September 2006, 07:23 PM

katrina

Permanent Resident

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The link between Notes on a Scandal and I Need to Talk About Kevin, shouldn't be all too big because NoaS spends very little time focusing on the teenager, and is muxh more interested in the middle age ladies relationship.

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20th September 2006, 10:51 PM

 

Mungus

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And whatever happened to the film of Notes on a Scandal?

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* #497 *

21st September 2006, 11:29 AM

 

donnae

Subscriber

 

I was having a browse through IMDB the other day, and it looks like it is being released just before Christmas in the States. Not sure when it will be out here.

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#498 *

23rd September 2006, 02:42 PM

katrina

Permanent Resident

 

I'm just about to start the Booker nominated Carry Me Down, M.J. Hyland. Had a brief read of the first few pages this morning and it starts well - unfortunately I have loads to do so probably won't get to sit down to it till this evening

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3rd September 2006, 03:12 PM

 

Phoebus

Subscriber

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Have changed my mind. One Flew Over the Cuckoo's Nest by Ken Kesey.

 

Have just read the first thirty pages. Fantastic. I'm on a roll of good books.

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Mungus

Subscriber

 

I seem to be on a bad run at the moment. I abandoned Everyman, Philip Roth because I couldn't get interested in it but I think that was because the two books I'd read before that were only average so my patience was running thin. I've started In The Fold, Rachel Cusk and it seems to be populated with annoying caricatures. Ho hum.

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29th September 2006, 08:25 AM

 

Paul

Subscriber

 

Finished Brick Lane and I have to say I did enjoy it.... a solid debut.

 

Moved onto some non-fiction with The God Delusion by Richard Dawkins and also Adam Ants autobiography - 'Stand and Deliver'

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#502 *

29th September 2006, 05:13 PM

katrina

Permanent Resident

 

I've just finished Carry Me Down, MJ Hyland and I'm just starting another Booker nomination Mother's Milk byEdward St Aubyn - looks promising from the first few chapters

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Hazel

Subscriber and Resident

 

I started Northern Lights by Philip Pullman last night. I start tutoring a boy for his Higher English on Monday and his first assignment is to write about a book of his choise and he chose this - so I have to to read it this weekend.

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* #504 *

30th September 2006, 02:51 PM

Lady Lazarus

Founder Member

*

Originally Posted by Paul

Moved onto some non-fiction with The God Delusion by Richard Dawkins

'm very interested in this book, it's definitely on my TBR list (and possibly hubby's Xmas list!) Love to know what you think of it...

 

I am still ploughing thorugh The History of the Arab Peoples... it takes me so long to finish a non-fiction book! Very interesting tho, just lots of detail.

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30th September 2006, 05:07 PM

katrina

Permanent Resident

*

Originally Posted by Hazel

I started Northern Lights by Philip Pullman last night. I start tutoring a boy for his Higher English on Monday and his first assignment is to write about a book of his choise and he chose this - so I have to to read it this weekend.

sounds like a good type of assignment to me, good luck with the tutoring

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September 2006, 07:28 PM

 

Hazel

Subscriber and Resident

 

Thanks Katrina!

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* #507 *

8th October 2006, 08:20 PM

 

Brightphoebus

Subscriber

Originally Posted by Mungus

I seem to be on a bad run at the moment... I've started In The Fold, Rachel Cusk and it seems to be populated with annoying caricatures. Ho hum.

That was my experience too, with Rachel Cusk. I found her to be a spectacularly bad writer . I'm so pleased you are thinking along those same lines, Mungus. Did you get any further since your last post?

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8th October 2006, 09:15 PM

 

Mungus

Subscriber

Originally Posted by Brightphoebus

That was my experience too, with Rachel Cusk. I found her to be a spectacularly bad writer . I'm so pleased you are thinking along those same lines, Mungus. Did you get any further since your last post?

I think I gave up around page 100, having got bored! I normally bale out sooner than that if I'm going to but having just abandoned the Philip Roth, I felt like maybe it was me going through a bad phase. Seems I'm not alone though! Cusk gets such good reviews... Not that they ever mean much, but still.

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10th October 2006, 07:10 AM

 

Paul

Subscriber

*

Just finished Adam Ants autobiography -- really enjoyed this book. Nearing the end of The God Delusion by Richard Dawkins, which is providing much food for thought.

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Hazel

Subscriber and Resident

Originally Posted by Paul

Just finished Adam Ants autobiography -- really enjoyed this book.

Oh good Paul, I am glad someone has read it - do you feel like posting a review as I would like to hear your thoughts about the book before I buy it? A recent review kind of poked fun at Goddard's use of cliches and superlatives.

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Paul

Subscriber

Originally Posted by Hazel

Oh good Paul, I am glad someone has read it - do you feel like posting a review as I would like to hear your thoughts about the book before I buy it? A recent review kind of poked fun at Goddard's use of cliches and superlatives.

Will do -- it isn't a literary masterpiece by any stretch of the imagination, but for a nostalgic look at the punk and post-punk 80's it's well worth a look.... I will put something in the biography section shortly...

 

Nearing the end of The God Delusion as well - I'm away on holiday next week so I need to start thinking of my reading for the trip....

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th October 2006, 05:12 PM

 

minxminnie

Subscriber

Originally Posted by Paul

I'm away on holiday next week so I need to start thinking of my reading for the trip....

Me too - isn't it great? I must dig up the Holiday Reading thread.

 

Just now I'm reading Judge Sewall's Apology - The Salem Witch Trials and the Forming of a Conscience.

Sounds a bit dry, but I love Miller's The Crucible, and this tells you about the only judge who, in real life, was willing to admit he had made a mistake. Reading about the real life trials of John Proctor etc gives me a shiver up my spine. (As did seeing the grave stones online a couple of years ago.) And it's amazing to grasp just how easily the fear of witchcraft took hold in their society.

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11th October 2006, 07:18 PM

 

Hazel

Subscriber and Resident

*

Originally Posted by minxminnie

Just now I'm reading Judge Sewall's Apology - The Salem Witch Trials and the Forming of a Conscience.

Sounds a bit dry, but I love Miller's The Crucible, and this tells you about the only judge who, in real life, was willing to admit he had made a mistake. Reading about the real life trials of John Proctor etc gives me a shiver up my spine. (As did seeing the grave stones online a couple of years ago.) And it's amazing to grasp just how easily the fear of witchcraft took hold in their society.

Ooh that's a great book. I read it sometime last year, and have read a few books on the Salem Witch Trials but Judge Sewell's really stood out for me. Very creepy reading. My sister went to Salem last year and brought me back bags full of stuff to read and treasure. I would love to go when the boys are older and are bearable on a flight to America.

 

I am reading The Woman In White by Wilkie Collins just now for Uni next year.

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12th October 2006, 03:56 PM

 

Paul

Subscriber

 

Finished The God Delusion by Richard Dawkins, which gives much food for the gray matter.... certainly one to think carefully about, I'll try and put my thoughts together and put up a review....

 

Just thumbing through The Tao of Pooh by Benjamin Hoff before my hols .... I've got the new James Herbert waiting for my return, but because its a hardback can't be bothered hiking it on the plane.... Stephen Kings latest is due out soon as well .....

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14th October 2006, 11:55 AM

katrina

Permanent Resident

 

Picked up this months BGO read If Not Now, When? by Primo Levi read the first few pages and looks a promising read

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* #516 *

14th October 2006, 09:25 PM

 

Momo

Subscriber and Permanent Resident

 

Still haven't received that one.

In the meantime, I started Destined to Witness by Hans J. Massaquoi, a guy born in 1926 to a German mother and a Liberian father in Germany. He lived in Germany during the Nazi regime. Very interesting.

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October 2006, 12:23 PM

 

Momo

Subscriber and Permanent Resident

 

Just started my latest RL book club read "A Short History of Tractors in Ukranian". Seems very interesting.

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Hazel

Subscriber and Resident

 

Just started Madame Bovary by Gustave Flaubert - another of my uni books to read for next year. It's got a lot to live up to after The Woman in White.

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t October 2006, 11:18 AM

 

minxminnie

Subscriber

 

I read The Constant Gardener while away on holiday, in a highland cottage with lots of time to read. If I read a thriller, I need to have lots of time to read it in big chunks, otherwise I lose track of the story.

Anyway, I'm now onto Joseph Knight by James Robertson. It was one of Amazon's recommendations, and they seem to have come up trumps for me! It's a historical novel, set in the West Indies of the late 1700s and Scotland of the early 1800s, and it deals with a wealthy landowner searching for the slave who ran away when he brought him to Scotland, 24 years before the search. It still has to unfold, so I don't yet know why he ran away or why he wants to find him after 24 years, and according to the blurb, there is something about a celebrated court case. I'm completely hooked! It has lots of rave reviews on Amazon and won to Saltire book prize a few years back, but I wouldn't have discovered it if it wasn't for the wonders of Amazon recommendations.

(All done through the BGO link, of course!)

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Lady Lazarus

Founder Member

 

I finally finished my History of the Arab Peoples, and am now about 200 pages into The Children's War. really enjoying it so far. I find myself saying I'll stop when I've read this page, but I just keep on turning the pages!

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* #521 *

23rd October 2006, 06:47 PM

katrina

Permanent Resident

 

I'm reading Going Solo by Roald Dahl, as I'm going to be teaching it as part of an autobiography module. I'm also just about to start White Ghost Girls by Alice Greenaway. I picked it up today in the library and its managed to budge itself to the top of the pile, looks quite a quick read which appeals to m present mood.

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October 2006, 11:35 AM

 

Paul

Subscriber

 

Just got back from my hols and gone straight into Stephen Kings latest - Liseys Story

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th October 2006, 11:37 AM

 

Hazel

Subscriber and Resident

Originally Posted by Paul

Just got back from my hols and gone straight into Stephen Kings latest - Liseys Story

Hope you had a nice time Paul. I am surprised to see that King's new book is actually getting ok reviews this time round. Almost tempted myself.

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h October 2006, 12:42 PM

 

chuntzy

Subscriber

Originally Posted by Hazel

Hope you had a nice time Paul. I am surprised to see that King's new book is actually getting ok reviews this time round. Almost tempted myself.

Except on Newsnight Review last Friday night when all four critics lambasted it!

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Hazel

Subscriber and Resident

Originally Posted by chuntzy

Except on Newsnight Review last Friday night when all four critics lambasted it!

Really? Well, that's par for the course with King! Certainly the newspaper reviews are a little better this time round than the ones given for Cell. Maybe I won't rush down to the bookshop then!

 

I am currently reading The Great Gatsby as the boy I am tutoring just now has to read it for class. He told me last week that he hates it, and that it is boring. I read it such a long time ago now that I felt unable to argue convincingly with him! So re-reading now so I can lambast him appropriately!

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Momo

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Since I'm still waiting for my copy of If not now, when?, I have started I know why the caged bird sings by Maya Angelou. Starts quite nicely and seems interesting.

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30th October 2006, 03:14 PM

 

Paul

Subscriber

*

Originally Posted by Hazel

Really? Well, that's par for the course with King! Certainly the newspaper reviews are a little better this time round than the ones given for Cell. Maybe I won't rush down to the bookshop then!

 

I am currently reading The Great Gatsby as the boy I am tutoring just now has to read it for class. He told me last week that he hates it, and that it is boring. I read it such a long time ago now that I felt unable to argue convincingly with him! So re-reading now so I can lambast him appropriately!

I did have a good time - thanks Hazel..... I'm a long time fan of King, and I thought Cell was poor -- this one is starting quite slowly, and is obviously less horror and a more 'serious' novel .... not seen the reviews, but I fear I'm someone who will pick up his work anyway and see whats going on...... I'll post my thoughts when I've finished..... I'll then be moving onto James Herberts latest! So my horror roots from the early 80's still are strong when coming to reading these authors .... loyalty from my youth as much as anything -- but they still write a good yarn ..... IMHO!

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30th October 2006, 05:12 PM

katrina

Permanent Resident

 

I'm reading The Line of Beauty, I started it last week and really enjoyed the first section, but the charcters in the second section seem so unreal I'm struggling. I'm determined to perservere for a while longer and see if it gets better again.

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30th October 2006, 05:50 PM

 

Grammath

Subscriber and Founder Member

 

I'm having such a brain scramblingly horrible time at work at the moment that I can't cope with anything too demanding to read just now, so I'm on the 5th Harry Potter.

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30th October 2006, 06:02 PM

 

minxminnie

Subscriber

 

I'm reading The Blind Assassin by Margaret Drabble. The Sci Fi of the novel within the novel nearly put me off, but I persevered and I'm glad I did as I'm now quite hooked on it! The main narrative is ok, not quite enough to draw me back after the wonderful Joseph Knight which I've just finished.

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30th October 2006, 07:22 PM

 

Mungus

Subscriber

*

Originally Posted by minxminnie

I'm reading The Blind Assassin by Margaret Drabble.

.

Surely Margaret Atwood? I'm reading Extremely Loud and Incredibly Close by Jonathan Safrar Foen which is very likeable so far. I was a bit worried that it would be hard work, I've given up on a few of like that lately.

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* #532 *

30th October 2006, 08:08 PM

 

minxminnie

Subscriber

Originally Posted by Mungus

Surely Margaret Atwood?

Oops, yes! I should pay more attention to what I'm posting.

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MarkC

Subscriber

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I'm currently reading Love in the time of the cholera by Gabriel Garcia Marquez. Small departure from my normal diet of science fiction and Jane Austen.

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Momo

Subscriber and Permanent Resident

Originally Posted by MarkC

I'm currently reading Love in the time of the cholera by Gabriel Garcia Marquez. Small departure from my normal diet of science fiction and Jane Austen.

Very small indeed.

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31st October 2006, 05:01 PM

katrina

Permanent Resident

Originally Posted by katrina

I'm reading The Line of Beauty, I started it last week and really enjoyed the first section, but the charcters in the second section seem so unreal I'm struggling. I'm determined to perservere for a while longer and see if it gets better again.

Woo-hoo! My book got reaaly good again, I had to persuade myself that I really ought to be going to sleep instead of carrying on reading last night, if I hadn't had my awful year 8s to face first thing this morning I probably would have carried on.

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Momo

Subscriber and Permanent Resident

 

Great, sometimes it really pays off to persevere. Maybe the same helps with your year 8s. I know that's a lot tougher, so, keep on smiling.

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2nd November 2006, 07:05 PM

katrina

Permanent Resident

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My other yr 8s are lovely (most of the time) so they keep me smiling.

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November 2006, 09:18 AM

 

Momo

Subscriber and Permanent Resident

Originally Posted by katrina

My other yr 8s are lovely (most of the time) so they keep me smiling.

Yes, they can be lovely - if they want to. My little one is that age, so I know them pretty well and have some in my extra-English lessons, as well.

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4th November 2006, 09:05 AM

chuntzy

Senior Member

Originally Posted by minxminnie

I'm reading The Blind Assassin by Margaret Drabble. The Sci Fi of the novel within the novel nearly put me off, but I persevered and I'm glad I did as I'm now quite hooked on it! The main narrative is ok, not quite enough to draw me back after the wonderful Joseph Knight which I've just finished.

Quite agree about the sci-fi part of [The Blind Assassin], an element that I thought for a bit would put me off reading it all. Thank goodness I wasn't put off as the novel really gripped me. I and five friends are meeting up to discuss this novel at the end of the month: it's our first go at an informal book group. One of them (over 60) never ever reads fiction only Gradgrindian facts, facts, facts. Takes all sorts.

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LesleyMP

Subscriber

 

I have just started reading 'Fight Club' by Chuck Palahniuk and, just a couple of chapters in I am already hooked. I have seen the film several times and have wanted to read the book for a long time, already thinking of treating myself to some more books by the same author. Also picked up a childrens book 'I, Coriander' by Sally Gardner, again - just a couple of chapters in but already looking good.

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#541 *

6th November 2006, 07:28 AM

Jane Nadia

Senior Member

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Just started 'Kitchen Confidential' by Anthony Bourdain. Read his 'A Cook's Tour' a couple of years ago and really enjoyed that. Like lovely Nigel Slater, this guy can write well.

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#542 *

6th November 2006, 08:15 AM

chuntzy

Resident

 

 

Three books on the go: Lynn Knight's biography 'Clarice Cliff'' (lots of social background especially about the Potteries)- oops, I suppose I shouldn't have mentioned any NF, 'The Historian' by Elizabeth Kostova and Henning Mankell's 'The Fifth Woman'.

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6th November 2006, 08:17 AM

 

Hazel

Subscriber and Resident

*

Originally Posted by chuntzy

oops, I suppose I shouldn't have mentioned any NF,

Why ever not?

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6th November 2006, 04:47 PM

 

Claire

Founder Member

Originally Posted by Jane Nadia

Just started 'Kitchen Confidential' by Anthony Bourdain. Read his 'A Cook's Tour' a couple of years ago and really enjoyed that. Like lovely Nigel Slater, this guy can write well.

I read (or rather, reread) Kitchen Confidential recently. Good, isn't it! Maybe I'll start a thread....

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* #545 *

6th November 2006, 05:18 PM

katrina

Permanent Resident

 

I started reading Translations of Beauty by Mia Yun:

Mia Yun maps the relationship of twin sisters Inah and Yunah from their early childhood in South Korea to their coming of age in Queens, New York. At the centre of TRANSLATIONS OF BEAUTY is the terrible childhood accident that disfigured Inah for life, and the overwhelming sadness and guilt Yunah feels at having been spared. An unforgettable portrait of growing up in America as immigrant children, Yun's novel charts the sisters' endeavour to keep their family whole as years of collective traumas, individual tragedies, and colliding dreams take their toll. Told from Yunah's intimate, engaging point of view and enriched by a culturally diverse population of supporting characters, the darkly poignant TRANSLATIONS OF BEAUTY achieves timeless, universal resonance in its chronicle of one family's harrowing - and ultimately redemptive - struggle for dignity, acceptance and wholeness.

started last night, but was really tired so I only managed a few chapters, but looks really good - can't wait to curl up in bed and read some more with a nice cup of hot chocolate.

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6th November 2006, 05:52 PM

 

Momo

Subscriber and Permanent Resident

 

Just started "Thyme Out" by Katie Fforde, a present from a friend. Looks like a very easy read.

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6th November 2006, 06:23 PM

 

Grammath

Subscriber and Founder Member

*

My new audiobook is T C Boyle's "Drop City".

 

I also dipped into the "McSweeney's Thrilling Tales" anthology at the weekend, and will be dipping some more.

 

Need to start a Julian Barnes novel for my RL book group but haven't decided which one yet. Probably "Metroland", having been born and raised in that part of the world.

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Hazel

Subscriber and Resident

*

Re-reading Dracula by Bram Stoker for uni. I first read it when I was about 14 so it will be interesting if I have a different experience of it this year. The biggest surprise was finding someone else in the world called Mina!

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* #549 *

9th November 2006, 08:10 PM

chuntzy

Resident

Originally Posted by Hazel

Why ever not?

Well, Hazel, the thread is general fiction so I took it literally being a literary type.

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9th November 2006, 08:33 PM

 

megustaleer

Moderator

 

I have two books on the go at the moment:

Medea, by Christa Woolf (one of Germany's pe-eminent literary figures, according to the frontispiece, is that so, Momo?).

 

The Call of Cthulu and Other Weird Stories, by H.P.Lovecraft.

 

Neither are lighting my fire, but I am obliged to finish Medea as it's for my postal bookgroup, and I feel that I ought to perervere with the Lovecraft at least until i've read the title story...which is nearly halfway through the book.

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#551 *

9th November 2006, 08:35 PM

 

Flingo

Subscriber and Permanent Resident

 

I've really got to start reading Small Islands by Andrea Levy for next Thursday's Book Club meeting. But, but, but....that means getting over my current Janet Evanovich passion, and putting down the books in the Steph Plum series. Today I finished reading Seven Up, and without even knowing I had done so, had read the first 60 pages of Hard Eight.

 

Need some will power.....!

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10th November 2006, 12:47 PM

 

Paul

Subscriber

 

Just finished Kings latest 'Liseys Story' which was better than Cell .... a good solid story - but some might argue there's nothing greatly new here. One for King fans I feel rather than casual readers.

 

Onto James Herberts new release 'The Secret of Crickly Hall'... typical Herbert here, the olde fashioned ghost/haunted house story.....

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12th November 2006, 07:26 PM

 

Momo

Subscriber and Permanent Resident

 

I have just started "If not now, when?" by Primo Levi. The beginning is quite interesting. I like that kind of storytelling.

I had started (because I was waiting for this book and didn't receive it) a short book - I meant to write in my signature "I am reading the shortest book in history, about German humour" but it was too long. So, I write it here! It is quite a short one but very, very funny. The author has written articles which he now put together in a booklet. It's about people hearing lyrics of songs incorrectly. A little bit like the title "A Monk Swimming" by Malachy McCourt who mentioned that as a child he had always thought that was the sentence in "Hail Mary" - blessed art thou amongst women.

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554 *

12th November 2006, 11:04 PM

kelmarie

Member

 

i've just started reading vanishing acts by jodi piccoult

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13th November 2006, 06:08 PM

katrina

Permanent Resident

 

I gave up on Translations of Beauty when I realised I didn't actually give a damn what happened to the characters. I've started You Have To Be Careful In The Land Of The Free By James Kelman, started really well but as its written phonetically in a Scottish accent it's taking slightly longer to read than an ordinary book. Took me ages to figure out what Uhmerkin was

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13th November 2006, 06:15 PM

 

minxminnie

Subscriber

Originally Posted by katrina

I gave up on Translations of Beauty when I realised I didn't actually give a damn what happened to the characters.

This happens to me a lot! It's my crunch question when I'm hesitating to go back to a book. I've just given up on The Blind Assassin for the same reason - well written, but I just hadn't engaged with the people.

Originally Posted by katrina

I've started You Have To Be Careful In The Land Of The Free By James Kelman, started really well but as its written phonetically in a Scottish accent it's taking slightly longer to read than an ordinary book. Took me ages to figure out what Uhmerkin was

I wondered how you'd cope with it! I find Kelman hard going, and everyone around here talks like that!

A Disaffection is worth trying, if you're ever having a bad teaching phase - it's written from the point of view of a cynical and fed up teacher, and is quite recognisable. Sometimes, you just need to know that someone else has worse days than you ...!

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13th November 2006, 06:24 PM

katrina

Permanent Resident

Don't you just go to the staff room for that!

 

I'm not doing to badly its just slowing me down - in my head I have a fantastic Scottish accent

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558 *

13th November 2006, 06:24 PM

 

Mungus

Subscriber

 

 

I'm reading In the Footsteps of Scott by Roger Mear and Robert Scott. It tells the story of their Antarctic expedition in the early 80s. I've had the book for a while, got it off ebay. Robert Scott gave a talk to a company meeting where I once worked and he was so inspiring, I've never forgotten it (and it was probably 12+ years ago). The things that he'd done made the rest of us all feel so insignificant. I'm about 30 pages in and already feeling in awe.

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* #559 *

14th November 2006, 04:10 PM

 

Momo

Subscriber and Permanent Resident

Originally Posted by katrina

I gave up on Translations of Beauty when I realised I didn't actually give a damn what happened to the characters.

I think that is a good point to stop since it's definitely an indication you don't enjoy the book.

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donnae

Subscriber

 

I am excited that I am just about to start on The Closed Circle by Jonathan Coe. This is the follow-up to The Rotter's Club by the same author, which I have just re-read as I had forgotten quite a lot of the story line and characters.

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#561 *

14th November 2006, 09:04 PM

kelmarie

Member

 

i've read the closed circle. it's a good book.

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Royal Rother

Founder Member

 

Snow Falling on Cedars - David Gutterson

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15th November 2006, 02:31 PM

 

megustaleer

Moderator

Originally Posted by Royal Rother

Snow Falling on Cedars - David Gutterson

You are still working your way through those boxes in the loft, then?

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Royal Rother

Founder Member

 

I am indeed! And I made another raid last night strangely enough (first time for a few months), and I came down with about 8 books, and a load of lego for my son!

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megustaleer

Moderator

Originally Posted by Royal Rother

a load of lego for my son!

Oh yeah?

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15th November 2006, 10:36 PM

 

Momo

Subscriber and Permanent Resident

 

Originally Posted by Royal Rother

Snow Falling on Cedars - David Gutterson

I've read two of his other books, this one is still on my wishlist, since I like his other books very much, especially East of the Mountain. Please, let us know how you liked this one.

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Phoebus

Subscriber

*

 

 

Mark Haddon: A Spot of Bother

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#568 *

17th November 2006, 04:19 PM

jebbie74

Founder Member

*

I'm currently reading "Fall On Your Knees" by Anne-Marie MacDonald. I'm still waiting for the parts that are supposed to make you go "Ohhhhhh!". But maybe I am expecting too much as I tend to read a lot of gory thrillers

 

I'm enjoying the writing style, and as much as the story would move from character to character within each chapter, I'm still finding it fairly easy to follow.

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* #569 *

17th November 2006, 07:17 PM

Carla

Member

 

I just finished reading Quite Honestly by John Mortimer. I'm about to start The Hazards of Good Breeding by Jessica Shattuck.

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17th November 2006, 07:26 PM

chuntzy

Resident

*

I was reading until last night Elizabeth Kostova's 'The Historian' but couldn't motivate myself to get beyond page 200.

 

I read somewhere that it's akin to Eco's 'The Name of the Rose'. No comparison. I think she had an eye for 'international best seller' as there are so many European destinations mentioned in the 'search'. Didn't grip me.

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Dr. Strangelove

17th November 2006 10:04 PM

 

Half way through Wuthering Heights

Definately better than Pride and Prejudice or Jane Eyre

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Royal Rother

20th November 2006 09:36 AM

 

Lone Pine Five - Malcolm Saville

 

The first children's book I have read for my own pleasure for 30+ years. A pleasurable slice of nostalgia. And a decent enough read too!!

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Paul

20th November 2006 10:08 AM

 

Just finished the latest James Herbert book, which I really enjoyed. A great Ghost Haunted house tale - nothing cutting edge or original but a real joy none the less....

 

Led me onto some non-fiction including Haunted Leeds by Kenneth Goor...

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Hazel

20th November 2006 10:52 AM

 

The Awakening - Kate Chopin - another uni set text!

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minxminnie

20th November 2006 04:51 PM

 

Kitchen Confidential by Anthony Bourdain. I picked it up on impluse from my sidelined TBR pile yesterday, being stranded indoors and confined to the sofa with a cold that left me feeling washed out. I had started it once before, but I read about two thirds of it yesterday and really enjoyed it - he can really write!

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Grammath

20th November 2006 05:35 PM

 

Spent part of the weekend reading Ernest Hemingway's "A Moveable Feast", a brief (126 pages) account of his years as a struggling young writer in Paris and the literary circles in which he moved whilst there. It includes prose protraits of fellow writers such as Gertrude Stein, Scott Fitzgerald and James Joyce, as well as regular visits to Shakespeare & Co.

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Momo

20th November 2006 06:03 PM

Originally Posted by jebbie74

I'm currently reading "Fall On Your Knees" by Anne-Marie MacDonald. I'm still waiting for the parts that are supposed to make you go "Ohhhhhh!". But maybe I am expecting too much as I tend to read a lot of gory thrillers :)

I'm enjoying the writing style, and as much as the story would move from character to character within each chapter, I'm still finding it fairly easy to follow.

Sorry, you won't find any gory bits, it's not a thriller. I enjoyed her book, read it with my RL book club shortly after it came out since one of our members' sisters was a friend of the author - or something like that. Anyway, I thought it was very interesting and quite enjoyed this one and her follow-up but there were quite a few in our club who didn't get into it or simply didn't like it.

Originally Posted by Dr. Strangelove

Half way through Wuthering Heights

Definately better than Pride and Prejudice or Jane Eyre

I have finally received "If not now, when?" and have almost finished it. I really like it.

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Flingo

20th November 2006 11:16 PM

 

Eragon by Christopher Paolini - I've meant to read it for ages, and as the film is due out just before Christmas, I've decided to force myself - that way nothing will get spoilt by the film trailers!

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Paul

21st November 2006 07:01 AM

 

Just picked up The Book of Secrets by Deepak Chopra

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megustaleer

21st November 2006 01:15 PM

 

About to start This Thing Of Darkness, which I have borrowed from my DiL, having given it to her for Christmas last year.

It is of brick-like proportions, and she has only read bit of it. I will probably have to break off part way through, as I doubt I'll finish it before next month's bookgroup choice arrives.

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Lady Lazarus

21st November 2006 02:16 PM

 

I've just finished The Children's War this morning, very good it was too! Just about to start The Successor by Albanian writer Ismail Kadare, which was a birthday present from hubby (who's Kosovan)

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Barblue

21st November 2006 03:52 PM

 

Middlemarch by George Elliot is the set book until the end of the year of our local reading group - we meet weekly. Just at the end of Book Two and already it's creating quite a bit of discussion. One of our members is a retired vicar and has studied the book in an earlier life so we are getting some interesting insight into the religious themes in the novel. The poetry prefixes to each chapter are intriguing us too. Apart from that we are all really getting into the feel of the story. I've never read Eliot before and didn't think I would enjoy it this much.

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Hazel

21st November 2006 03:56 PM

Originally Posted by barblue

Middlemarch by George Elliot is the set book until the end of the year of our local reading group - we meet weekly. Just at the end of Book Two and already it's creating quite a bit of discussion. One of our members is a retired vicar and has studied the book in an earlier life so we are getting some interesting insight into the religious themes in the novel. The poetry prefixes to each chapter are intriguing us too. Apart from that we are all really getting into the feel of the story. I've never read Eliot before and didn't think I would enjoy it this much

.

Middlemarch, is one of my set books for uni next year, so I will be reading it sometime between now and January. I must say that I am intimidated by it's size. Even though I have read huge doorsteps before, this just seems liek a huge book!

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My Friend Jack

21st November 2006 05:26 PM

 

As far as I can tell, I haven't contributed to this thread before (which is odd, but there you go!).

 

For the third time in my life, I have embarked upon Lord Of The Rings. Already I have made more progress than ever before, as I managed to get to the end of The Fellowship, which I've never done on pervious attempts.

 

I have to say that it's been made a lot easier by the BBC radio version (from 26 years ago!!!), as I can hear the characters' voices so clearly - especially Frodo, Aragorn and Gandalf - and the narrator. Not forgetting Bilbo, who was played so well by John le Mesurier.

 

Although I have the DVDs, I haven't watched them, as I wanted to read the books first. With a little luck I may be able to watch the DVDs before too long...

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Hazel

21st November 2006 07:02 PM

Originally Posted by My Friend Jack

For the third time in my life, I have embarked upon Lord Of The Rings. Already I have made more progress than ever before, as I managed to get to the end of The Fellowship, which I've never done on pervious attempts

.

More power to you MFJ, I have never gotten past page 93 of the first book and I won't spoil your reading by unleashing my LOTR tirade. You're a better man than I.

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1st November 2006, 07:17 PM

 

Momo

Subscriber and Permanent Resident

Originally Posted by Hazel

Middlemarch, is one of my set books for uni next year, so I will be reading it sometime between now and January. I must say that I am intimidated by it's size. Even though I have read huge doorsteps before, this just seems liek a huge book!

Don't be intimidated, it's a great story. I'm sure you'll get into it in no time. If you like Jane Austen (and I think you do), you'll like Middlemarch.

22nd November 2006, 11:25 AM

 

Royal Rother

Founder Member

*

South By Java Head - Alistair MacLean

 

Very exciting so far, even if the various heroics are more than somewhat far-fetched.

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d November 2006, 11:40 AM

 

Hazel

Subscriber and Resident

Originally Posted by Momo

Don't be intimidated, it's a great story. I'm sure you'll get into it in no time. If you like Jane Austen (and I think you do), you'll like Middlemarch.

I do like JA, and I am looking forward to getting stuck into MM though a little scared! MM and Dombey & Son are by far the larger of my set books for next year and are currently at the bottom of my pile. I am just not brave enough to delve into them now and would prefer to get the shorter novels out of the way first. Though Woman in White was nearly 900 pages and that flew by!

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589 *

22nd November 2006, 11:54 AM

Barblue

Subscriber

 

Our reading group thought MM was daunting at first Hazel. Then we realised that it was divided into eight books, so we decided to do one book a week. Some members of the group set themselves a goal of reading two chapters a day and that works for them. Surprisingly, one member who was most daunted and wanted a child's version (not one available as far as we know) or a precis version, is now so into it she cannot put it down and has gone far beyond the prescribed read. She says it's too good to put down!

 

My own personal read agrees with this last member. The only reason I put it aside for a few days was because I belong to two reading groups and wanted to get that group read started - Douglas Coupland's All Families are Psychotic - a much easier read but not nearly as satisfying as MM!

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22nd November 2006, 03:46 PM

 

Hazel

Subscriber and Resident

 

Thanks for the support guys. Currently, I am reading about 100 pages a day to be on course for finishing all 13 books by the end of January - so if I break MM down to that it seems a lot more doable. I am looking forward to the day when I can say offhandedly, "Middlemarch? Oh yeah, I read that ages ago".

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Momo

Subscriber and Permanent Resident

Originally Posted by Hazel

Thanks for the support guys. Currently, I am reading about 100 pages a day to be on course for finishing all 13 books by the end of January - so if I break MM down to that it seems a lot more doable. I am looking forward to the day when I can say offhandedly, "Middlemarch? Oh yeah, I read that ages ago".

And you will! In fact, I've been thinking about re-reading it for quite a while because I really, really enjoyed it. Whenever I have a book to finish at a certain time, I divide it up into so many pages per day and then stick to it. Most often, I read more. But that way I always know I will have finished it in time.

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22nd November 2006, 06:02 PM

 

Brightphoebus

Subscriber

 

Originally Posted by Hazel

I am looking forward to the day when I can say offhandedly, "Middlemarch? Oh yeah, I read that ages ago".

Oh, this was my set book for A level and I opened it with apprehension and dread. It turned out to be the most perfect book and we began racing each other to finish it. It's the one I re-read most often. I hope you love it as much as I do!

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22nd November 2006, 06:37 PM

 

Hazel

Subscriber and Resident

Originally Posted by Brightphoebus

Oh, this was my set book for A level and I opened it with apprehension and dread. It turned out to be the most perfect book and we began racing each other to finish it. It's the one I re-read most often. I hope you love it as much as I do!

 

Blimey, that's encouraging!

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594 *

23rd November 2006, 09:27 PM

Slowreader

Founder Member

 

I've just finished JG Ballard's 'Running Wild'. I picked this because I thought it would be a quick introduction to the author (its a novella of 80 or so pages). Although it is easy to guess the 'twist' in the plot, the way Ballard describes and explains it is quite thought - provoking. I may now go for one of his full-length novels.

 

I'm just about to start Slaughterhouse Five, a book I've been meaning to read for a long time

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donnae

Subscriber

Originally Posted by Slowreader

I've just finished JG Ballard's 'Running Wild'. I picked this because I thought it would be a quick introduction to the author (its a novella of 80 or so pages). Although it is easy to guess the 'twist' in the plot, the way Ballard describes and explains it is quite thought - provoking. I may now go for one of his full-length novels.

I have read a few Ballard novels and particularly enjoyed some of his very early dystopian books - The Drowned World, The Drought and The Wind from Nowhere (most of his earlier novels have been re-printed but I think this one has been deliberately forgotten - I have read somewhere that he has disowned it!) are all good.

 

Of his more recent work, I have read Cocaine Nights and Super Cannes and they were both typically cynical Ballard. I always feel he doesn't have a very high opinion of the human race.

 

I also have Millenium People lurking somewhere on a bookshelf.

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4th November 2006, 05:28 PM

 

Grammath

Subscriber and Founder Member

*

Originally Posted by Slowreader

I've just finished JG Ballard's 'Running Wild'. I picked this because I thought it would be a quick introduction to the author (its a novella of 80 or so pages). Although it is easy to guess the 'twist' in the plot, the way Ballard describes and explains it is quite thought - provoking. I may now go for one of his full-length novels.

 

I'm just about to start Slaughterhouse Five, a book I've been meaning to read for a long time

Those two should be interesting to compare to one another! Two favourite writers of mine, both dystopians of a sort, both intially thought of as science fiction writers, both deadpan, one, as donnae, with a cynical viewpoint, one absurdist.

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24th November 2006, 11:40 PM

 

Momo

Subscriber and Permanent Resident

 

Have just started a Dutch book Hoe God verdween uit Jorwerd by Geert Mak. It has been translated into English and its title is: Jorwerd: The Death of the Village in late 20th Century. It's a non-fiction book about the change of life in a village in Frisia, the northern part of the Netherlands. The beginning is pretty interesting.

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25th November 2006, 10:02 AM

 

Hazel

Subscriber and Resident

 

Taking a quick soujourn from the 19th C, and slipping in a new crime novel The Venus Fix by M J Rose, a proof copy. Back to the 19th C on Monday I hope.

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* #599 *

25th November 2006, 12:38 PM

Lady Lazarus

Founder Member

 

Just finished Ismail Kadare's The Successor, and now about to start Tess of the D'Urbervilles.

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25th November 2006, 01:02 PM

 

donnae

Subscriber

Originally Posted by Lady Lazarus

and now about to start Tess of the D'Urbervilles.

I love Tess of the D'urbervilles - but sometimes I just wanted to shake her!! It is beautifully written but very frustrating.

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Mungus

25th November 2006 02:39 PM

 

I'm about 50 pages in to The Woman In White, Wilkie Collins. It's fantastic! Thanks to everyone for the reviews on here, this book has been on my mental TBR list for ages, but the enthusiastic opinions posted finally spurred me into getting a copy.

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Momo

25th November 2006 03:22 PM

Originally Posted by donnae

I love Tess of the D'urbervilles - but sometimes I just wanted to shake her!! It is beautifully written but very frustrating.

I've got that quite high up my TBR pile, should start it soon. Now I'm really getting curious, I've heard soooo many different opinions about this book.

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katrina

26th November 2006 05:06 PM

 

I've given up on my James Kelman book, You Have To Be Careful In The Land Of tHE Free, it requires serious concentration, and I have far too much going on at the moment for it. I'm going to start Nought's and Crosses by Malorie Blackman,as I need to have an easy read that I'm actually going to finish, then move on to the new Susanna Clark book.

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Flingo

26th November 2006 05:31 PM

Originally Posted by katrina

I'm going to start Nought's and Crosses by Malorie Blackman,as I need to have an easy read.

 

I know it is a YA book, but I'm not sure that Noughts and Crosses can be described as "easy"! Let me know what you think!

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Royal Rother

26th November 2006 06:26 PM

 

The Maiden's Grave - Jeffery Deaver

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chuntzy

26th November 2006 06:31 PM

 

Uniform Justice by Donna Leon

Arthur and George by Julian Barnes

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Flingo

26th November 2006 06:37 PM

 

About to embark on Mark of the Angel by Nancy Huston. It was recommended to me back at the beginning of the year, and I have had it out from the library since then. I know I have renewed it to its limit (5 renewals) and then taken it off my card and started again! As I am sure it is nearly at renewal limit again, I thought it high time I read it.

 

Does any one else know it?

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Hazel

27th November 2006 09:22 AM

 

Started re-reading Jane Eyre by Charlotte Bronte today.

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Lady Lazarus

27th November 2006 11:03 AM

Originally Posted by chuntzy

Arthur and George by Julian Barnes

 

 

I bought this recently (not read it yet tho).. be interested to hear what you think of it...

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Mungus

27th November 2006 11:13 AM

Originally Posted by Lady Lazarus

I bought this recently (not read it yet tho).. be interested to hear what you think of it...

 

There's a thread on Arthur And George, if you're interested.

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Barblue

27th November 2006 11:28 AM

 

I read Arthur and George earlier this year. Like many on the thread, I thought it was a good read, but not great. I thought it could have been made smaller and therefore much more focused and intriguing. Having said that I am a fan of Julian Barnes.

 

Currently reading The Xmas Files: The Philosophy of Christmas by Stephen Law. Got this out of the Philosophy section and its the December read for my Borders reading group. Contains fourteen essays on different topics, confronting philosophical aspects of Christmas. It seems to be written in a lighthearted vein and we thought it might give us a bit of a lift whilst we all struggle to organise the holiday!

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Lady Lazarus

27th November 2006 11:46 AM

Quote]Originally Posted by barblue

Currently reading The Xmas Files: The Philosophy of Christmas by Stephen Law.[

ooh that sounds really interesting... putting it on my TBR pile, maybe for next year!

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Grammath

27th November 2006 06:15 PM

 

Started Vikram Seth's "An Equal Music" yesterday, and am now about 60 pages in. So far, so good.

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Momo

27th November 2006 08:18 PM

Originally Posted by Grammath

Started Vikram Seth's "An Equal Music" yesterday, and am now about 60 pages in. So far, so good.

Oh, please, let us know how you liked it. I read it a while ago and there is a thread.

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Paul

1st December 2006 12:14 PM

 

Finished Chopra's The Book of Secrets - which I did take quite alot from. Reading Dream Healer by Adam at the minute - a quite short book.

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* #616 *

1st December 2006, 10:46 PM

yorkshire rose

Member

Independent People by Haraldar(?) Laxness, something completely different - about peasant (not pleasant) life in Iceland, bit hard going at the mo'

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2nd December 2006, 05:25 PM

 

megustaleer

Moderator

 

I have not got very far into This Thing Of Darkness, although i've enjoyed what i've read of it so far. The problem being that it is too big for me to get comfortable while reading it, and that puts me off picking it up in the first place.

 

My RL bookgroup choice has arrived, so I will be taking a break from TTOD to read it; The Shock Of Your Life, by Adrian Holloway.

 

amazon synopsis:

This title contains four short fictional stories for teenagers about what could be waiting for each one of us if our lives were suddenly to end. The study guide aims to make this a useful teaching tool for youth workers. The work is also linked to a Website.

Holloway was a sports journalist, but his main work now appears to be with a Charismatic Christian Church

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2nd December 2006, 09:58 PM

 

chuntzy

Subscriber

Originally Posted by Lady Lazarus

I bought this recently (not read it yet tho).. be interested to hear what you think of it...

I'm 3/4 of the way through and it's kept my interest. Besides knowing it was a mixture of fact and fiction I knew very little else about it except that Barnes is a good writer. I certainly found myself getting involved with 'George'. when I've finished it I shall be in a better position to comment.

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* #619 *

3rd December 2006, 02:01 PM

yorkshire rose

Member

 

My book group read 'This Thing of Darkness' this summer, thumbs up all round. One of our number - a doctor - said it was the best book she's ever read! Not sure I'd go that far, but certainly a tour de force

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3rd December 2006, 07:50 PM

Barblue

Subscriber

 

Just started The Bookseller of Kabul - well about a third of the way through actually. I have looked for a thread but can't find one. Can someone direct me to one if there has been a discussion on this book, please? Otherwise has anybody else read it and have any comments to make - pretty please?

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3rd December 2006, 08:08 PM

 

megustaleer

Moderator

 

Thread for The Bookseller of Kabul

------------------------------------

 

Mungus

Subscriber

Originally Posted by yorkshire rose

My book group read 'This Thing of Darkness' this summer, thumbs up all round. One of our number - a doctor - said it was the best book she's ever read! Not sure I'd go that far, but certainly a tour de force

I enthused wildly on this thread , yorkshire rose, please add your comments and spread the word. I've met a few people since who've said 'I've just finished a really good book' and when I've asked what they've said 'This Thing Of Darkness'. I'm glad everyone liked it at your reading group.

 

Meg, persevere, and take the kitchen scissors to it if necessary, just don't tell Hazel!

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megustaleer

Moderator

Originally Posted by Mungus

Meg, persevere, and take the kitchen scissors to it if necessary, just don't tell Hazel!

Unfortunately I have borrowed this, so the scissors are not an option. Will perservere in short stints sitting at a table.

 

Having rejected a paperback copy of Dombey & Son at the Church Christmas Market on the grounds of its size I have had a serious think about the large book situation.

I have decided that in future I will definitely dismember any second-hand paperbacks that are too large/heavy, rather than not read them, or have my enjoyment of them spoiled by discomfort.

Wouldn't be able to bring myself to do that with new, or hardbacks 'though.

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* #624 *

3rd December 2006, 08:49 PM

Barblue

Subscriber

Originally Posted by megustaleer

Thread for The Bookseller of Kabul

Thanks Meg. It didn't occur to me to look in the Biography section. I must browse a little deeper in future.

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4th December 2006, 08:57 AM

 

Mungus

Subscriber

Originally Posted by megustaleer

I have decided that in future I will definitely dismember any second-hand paperbacks that are too large/heavy, rather than not read them, or have my enjoyment of them spoiled by discomfort.

I recently divided my copy of The Woman in White so that it was lighter to carry on the train and around the shops. I felt like I'd done something really wrong, like desecrating a grave!

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4th December 2006, 10:19 AM

 

Momo

Subscriber and Permanent Resident

Originally Posted by barblue

Thanks Meg. It didn't occur to me to look in the Biography section. I must browse a little deeper in future.

Don't worry, after a while you'll get the hang of it. And if you're really stuck, there's always the search engine - and the other BGO members which was a wise thing to do to ask them.

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#627 *

4th December 2006, 08:03 PM

katrina

Permanent Resident

 

Yay I finally read a whole book, has taken nearly a month!

 

Just have to decide what to read next - The Secret History by Donna Tart, The Ladies of Grace Adieu by Susanna Clarke or A Wild Sheep Chase by Murakami. Will probably take them all to bed with me and decide then.

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5th December 2006, 10:42 AM

 

Lady Lazarus

Founder Member

Originally Posted by katrina

The Secret History by Donna Tart

 

 

I loved this book. You'll be hooked from the first page. Can highly recommend it!

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5th December 2006, 06:12 PM

 

Grammath

Subscriber and Founder Member

 

Second that!

 

I'm a recent convert to the cult of Murakami (thanks to BGO!) - "A Wild Sheep Chase" is on my TBR mountain as well.

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#630 *

5th December 2006, 07:11 PM

katrina

Permanent Resident

 

well I still haven't decided, last night me head hit the pillow and I was away with the fairies. I might follow your recomendations though.

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katrina

6th December 2006 06:31 PM

 

I did decide on The Secret History in the end, seems alright maybe tonight I'll continue reading it when I'm less tired and get a bit further

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Floella

7th December 2006 05:11 PM

 

Hi Katrina

 

I loved A Wild Sheep Chase by Murakami. It did take me a while to get into it, I hate not finishing books so persevered, and then I couldn't put it down!

 

I just finished Dr Jekyll and Mr Hyde, so need something new to read...

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Lady Lazarus

7th December 2006 06:40 PM

 

I finished Tess of The D'Urbervilles yesterday, and am now halfway through Down & Out in Paris & London by George Orwell (a slim volume!). Really enjoying it so far, I like little books of anecdotes..

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minxminnie

7th December 2006 07:33 PM

 

My choice for the "First Lines" thread of Eric Newby's A Short Walk in the Hindu Kush inpired me to re-read it, something I rarely do. I'm enjoying it a lot. It's very funny, and I think just reading about all that exertion and exercise is good for me at this time of year! :D

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Hazel

8th December 2006 09:17 AM

 

Currently reading Far From The Madding Crowd by Thomas Hardy. Strangely, this is my first outing in Hardy land and I am enjoying it. I love the Gabriel Oak character - and so far Hardy's character names are just wonderful.

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Momo

8th December 2006 02:00 PM

 

I have just started our next book club read "The Piano Tuner" by David Mason. Looks very interesting, a piano tuner is called to tune the piano of a doctor/soldier in Burma in the 1880s. I think I'm really going to like this book.

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Red Fox

8th December 2006 04:29 PM

 

I am currently reading Bleak House and I am enjoying it more I thought I would, which is always good . The size of the book (and Dickens' reputation) are quite daunting, but I'm really getting into it.

 

The opening chapter with the fog is quite brilliant and the characters are great, especially some of the names (like Mr Tulkinghorn and Smallweed!) - although I'm not sure what to make of Esther as yet.

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katrina

8th December 2006 04:36 PM

Originally Posted by Hazel

Currently reading Far From The Madding Crowd by Thomas Hardy. Strangely, this is my first outing in Hardy land and I am enjoying it. I love the Gabriel Oak character - and so far Hardy's character names are just wonderful.

Wow, I'm shocked that you haven't read Hardy before. Though many people slate it I rate Tess of the d'Urbervilles really highly.

 

Hope you enjoy it, I always love reading about Wessex.

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My Friend Jack

8th December 2006 04:55 PM

Originally Posted by Momo

I have just started our next book club read "The Piano Tuner" by David Mason. Looks very interesting, a piano tuner is called to tune the piano of a doctor/soldier in Burma in the 1880s. I think I'm really going to like this book.

:thinking: I'm not sure why, but I really like that post. Thank you, Momo, you have brightened a dull Friday.

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Momo

9th December 2006 10:58 PM

 

You're welcome, MFJ, though I don't know why either. :)

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katrina

10th December 2006 11:54 AM

 

I'm about half way through The Secret History by Donna Tart and really struggling to put it down so I can do all the mundane tasks that need tackilng, thanks G and LL for suggesting I read this one first :flowers:

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Lady Lazarus

10th December 2006 07:36 PM

 

Glad you're enjoying it Katrina, it's definitely a page-turner. I loved the setting of the university, it really made me feel as if I were a part of it, in the dusty rooms discussing classics!

 

I have 1 page left of Down and Out in Paris and London to read, and then am going to get cracking with The Crimson Petal and the White. Very small print on the pages which is slightly off-putting, but it sounds like a great story.

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Lady Lazarus

10th December 2006 07:39 PM

Originally Posted by katrina

Though many people slate it I rate Tess of the d'Urbervilles really highly.

Tess was my first and only Hardy (so far!), and I really liked it. I felt so sorry for Tess, but wished I had read the book in my melancholy teenage years, as I'm sure I could've identified with her then! Why is it slated so much?

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Hazel

11th December 2006 08:52 AM

Originally Posted by katrina

Wow, I'm shocked that you haven't read Hardy before. Though many people slate it I rate Tess of the d'Urbervilles really highly.

 

Hope you enjoy it, I always love reading about Wessex.

I just never got round to picking up a Hardy book. I am glad that uni has made me though because I am fairly gripped by the story and really love Hardy's character naming and characterization.

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Hazel

12th December 2006 04:21 PM

 

Now onto Germinal by Emile Zola.

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*restored (original page 45)

 

#661 *

18th December 2006, 09:16 PM

Slowreader

Founder Member

Originally Posted by Momo

Food ... football ... what on earth are you talking about?

ok then, beer

 

if there's anything we've missed, please enlighten us

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18th December 2006, 11:01 PM

 

Momo

Subscriber and Permanent Resident

*

Originally Posted by Slowreader

ok then, beer

if there's anything we've missed, please enlighten us

Well, I might find an answer to that - but there are youngsters among us ...

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* #663 *

19th December 2006, 04:21 PM

katrina

Permanent Resident

 

I finally got around to starting The Crimson Petal and the White last night, I'd forgotten how well it starts and the strangeness of reading a book that talks to the reader as if they are going on a journey and as if the are phsically in the same room with the charcters.

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28th December 2006, 05:49 PM

 

minxminnie

Subscriber

*

We have a Secret Santa (2nd hand) book swap at work, and I'm getting near the end of the one I got - Two Lives by Vikram Seth.

It was a very good choice for me, as I like books about India and I studied German - it's a boigraphy of the author's uncle and aunt. He is Indian, she is a German Jew. They met in pre-war Berlin, and both moved to London just before the outbreak of war, though not together. Seth researched both of their lives through talking to his uncle (after his aunt's death) and looking at their correspondence. It turns out as a sort of history of the 20th century through the lives of two individuals.

I struggled a bit early on to maintain my interest, but then I got into it again, and I'm finding it really compelling.

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Momo

Subscriber and Permanent Resident

 

Minxminnie, that is on my TBR pile. I have similar interests than you, not that I studied German but I am German. And I think it sounds very interesting. Also, I read other novels by Vikram Seth and particularly liked "A Suitable Boy".

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1st January 2007, 09:39 PM

 

megustaleer

Moderator

 

For the first time in 3 weeks I'm not feeling too tired or too ill to read in bed, and as my postal bookclub parcel for January has arrived I will be snuggling down in a few minutes with The Red Tent by Anita Diamant.

 

I will return to This Thing Of Darkness later in the month.

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2nd January 2007, 09:21 AM

 

Hazel

Subscriber and Resident

 

Reading Germinal still during the days and at night I am on to The Pleasure of My Company by Steve Martin, which is a little odd but I am enjoying.

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* #668 *

2nd January 2007, 10:20 AM

katrina

Permanent Resident

*

Started last night The Apple by Micheal Faber, which are further stories from The Crimson Petal and The White. It was interesting reading the first story as he has written in his time-traveller style, but the story wasn't all that great - lets hope it improves!

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Grammath

Subscriber and Founder Member

 

My "reading resolution" for 2007 is to tackle more 19th century literature, so I've dived in at the deep end with "Anna Karenina".

 

The translation I'm reading (the current Penguin Classics) edition is very good indeed - this book does not feel like it was written 130 years ago.

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Momo

Subscriber and Permanent Resident

*

Oh, Grammath, I read this with my book club last year and we all really enjoyed it, even those who don't normally like classics. It's a wonderful book with a lot of issues and great characters. I'm sure you'll enjoy it. And its language is more contemporary than some of the other classics.

 

I am currently reading "My Name is Red" by Orhan Pamuk, the latest Nobel prize winner for literature. However, since I read it with some of my book club friends, I can't read it too fast and have chosen another book to accompany it which is completely different and quite easy "A Year in the Merde" by Stephen Clarke. However, I am sure I'll read "My Name is Red" faster than intended because it is very interesting

---------------------------------------------

 

Grammath

Subscriber and Founder Member

*

Thanks, Momo. I got through 150 pages over the holiday weekend so I'm already caught up in it. I'm especially fascinated by the character of Levin. Also, I wasn't expecting the sly homour in Tolstoy's writing - I mentally associate Russian literature with grimness so this was a pleasant surprise.

 

I read "My Name is Red" a couple of years ago and would say you definitely shouldn't try and hurry it. It is a sedate, meditative and subtle book and not always an easy read, so I'd say you need to take your time over it.

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2nd January 2007, 04:49 PM

 

Momo

Subscriber and Permanent Resident

 

Oh, thanks, Grammath. I won't rush reading "My Name is Red" but we have decided to read it at a slow pace since we all are members of our book club and some of us read with other groups, as well. However, it's a little too slow for my liking but I will try.

Once you get further into Anna Karenina and would like to disucss it, I started a thread a while ago but there was nobody who read it at the time. So, check it out here

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#673 *

3rd January 2007, 05:15 PM

katrina

Permanent Resident

 

I've started Fireworks by Angela Carter an author who I have always meant to get around to, looks promising and it's my first dig into that mountain of a tbr pile.

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4th January 2007, 11:44 AM

 

Grammath

Subscriber and Founder Member

 

As a total contrast from "Anna Karenina", my new audiobook is "Service with a Smile", the first of P. G. Wodehouse's Blandings novels I have read, having previously only read Jeeves & Wooster and a couple of other one-offs. However, so far it reaches the great man's customary levels of silliness.

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675 *

4th January 2007, 03:48 PM

mjple

Member

*

Join Date: Jan 2007

Posts: 35

 

That is quite a contrast My name is Red and a year in the Merde.

 

I agree that My Name is Red can be very tough going but worth reading. I will reserve my opinion on the other until you have finished it

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#676 *

4th January 2007, 03:52 PM

 

megustaleer

Moderator

 

Finished The Red Tent in 3 days...that's over 100 pages per day!

 

Now to get back to This Thing of Darkness.

I wish I could curl up in bed with it.

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th January 2007, 04:14 PM

 

Brightphoebus

Subscriber

*

Originally Posted by megustaleer

Now to get back to This Thing of Darkness.

I wish I could curl up in bed with it.

 

 

Why can't you, meg? Is it the arthritis?

-----------------------------------------

 

megustaleer

Moderator

Originally Posted by Brightphoebus

Why can't you, meg? Is it the arthritis?

Yes, the book is too heavy and too bulky for my hands to support it comfortably, so I have to sit at a desk, or table.

It is borrowed, too, and unread, so I don't really want to crack the spine if I can avoid it.

I am enjoying the story, just not the reading of it!

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Mungus

Subscriber

*

Originally Posted by megustaleer

It is borrowed, too, and unread, so I don't really want to crack the spine if I can avoid it.

That's a big ask! I've got a number of weighty tomes on my BGO shelf, including The Children's War, and I hate the way they are so hard to read when I'm lying on my side in bed (my reading position of choice). I'm going to have to do the scissor thing soon, TCW has been with me for a year now and it's about time I started it.

 

At the moment I am reading Love In The Time Of Cholera and a non-fiction book called Sunbathing in the Rain - a cheerful book about depression. Time will tell if it lives up to its name.

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th January 2007, 06:58 PM

 

Hazel

Subscriber and Resident

 

Borders, and I am sure other book retailers, sell a Book Chair that is really helpful if you are having trouble holding a book. Admittedly, it's little pegs may not hold back a thick book like The Children's War, but it certainly will allow you to rest it and your fingers are free to turn pages. I use one when I am studying and need hands free and it really is fantastic. This is the exact one I have -

 

http://www.amazon.co.uk/Bookchair-Standard-Stripes/dp/1905107048/ref=pd_ka_1/202-2462210-5908606?ie=UTF8&s=books&qid=1174405104&sr=8-1

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* #681 *

4th January 2007, 07:03 PM

Royal Rother

Founder Member

*

Join Date: Dec 2004

Posts: 1,260

 

 

 

Every Dead Thing - John Connolly

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#682 *

4th January 2007, 08:38 PM

 

megustaleer

Moderator

Originally Posted by Hazel

Borders, and I am sure other book retailers, sell a Book Chair that is really helpful if you are having trouble holding a book.

I have seen those, and been tempted, but it would still involve sitting at desk or table, and it's the 'curling up' with a book that I miss...or to be more accurate, lying on my side in bed, same as Mungus.

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4th January 2007, 09:28 PM

 

Stokos

Subscriber

 

Elizabeth Kostova: The Historian.

 

Terrific so far. Its an update of the vampire myths set over multiple timelines.

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anuary 2007, 09:33 PM

 

Momo

Subscriber and Permanent Resident

*

Originally Posted by mjple

That is quite a contrast My name is Red and a year in the Merde.

 

I agree that My Name is Red can be very tough going but worth reading. I will reserve my opinion on the other until you have finished it

Oh, please, start a thread and I'll add to it once I finished the book. I promise I won't look before. I never do that if I'm sure I still want to read the book.

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4th January 2007, 09:34 PM

 

Momo

Subscriber and Permanent Resident

*

 

This looks fantastic, Hazel. I will put it on my next order.

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4th January 2007, 09:43 PM

 

Flingo

Subscriber and Permanent Resident

*

Originally Posted by Stokos

Elizabeth Kostova: The Historian.

 

Terrific so far. Its an update of the vampire myths set over multiple timelines.

This has been read by many of our members. You can find a discussion

here that you might like to contribute to, Stokos.

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h January 2007, 09:44 PM

 

Stokos

Subscriber

Originally Posted by Flingo

This has been read by many of our members. You can find a discussion here that you might like to contribute to, Stokos

.

 

 

When I'm done (circa 2008) I will.

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h January 2007, 10:05 PM

 

Momo

Subscriber and Permanent Resident

Originally Posted by Stokos

When I'm done (circa 2008) I will.

Don't worry, there is a lot more to this site than discussing the book you are presently reading.

Welcome to BGO, I see you've been posting in a couple of threads already which is great. Looks like you feel at home already.

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* #689 *

5th January 2007, 08:08 PM

Krey20

Member

 

Revelation Space - Alastair Reynolds

 

First time I've tackled SF in a few years, really enjoying it.

 

It complies to my only rule concerning SF: The story should take presidence over the futuritic theorising.

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th January 2007, 08:24 PM

 

Stokos

Subscriber

Originally Posted by Krey20

Revelation Space - Alastair Reynolds

 

First time I've tackled SF in a few years, really enjoying it.

 

It complies to my only rule concerning SF: The story should take presidence over the futuritic theorising.

Really!!!!. I love Sci-Fi and found Revelation Space quite the most impenetrable book if tried in years. Different strokes!

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Krey20

5th January 2007 08:29 PM

Originally Posted by Stokos

Really!!!!. I love Sci-Fi and found Revelation Space quite the most impenetrable book if tried in years. Different strokes!

I see what you mean but I find it easier if the "science bit" - Oh no too many shampoo adverts - is told through the characters and not used as scene setting.

 

Enjoying it so far but "Century Rain" was better for the inclusion of a real world element.

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katrina

6th January 2007 11:53 AM

 

I've alredy given up on my first book of the year Fireworks by Angela Carter, hopefully this next choice will be more sucessful, Black Swan Green by David Mitchell

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Hazel

6th January 2007 12:07 PM

Originally Posted by katrina

I've already given up on my first book of the year Fireworks by Angela Carter,

I like some of Carter's books, but I find she can be a bit hit and miss. I haven't tried Fireworks though - don't think I will now either!

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Hazel

6th January 2007 12:09 PM

 

I am now on to Little Face by Sophie Hannah (prompted by the discussion going on about it here) and Dombey & Son by Charles Dickens (for uni).

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Lady Lazarus

6th January 2007 07:16 PM

 

Just about to start (well, am reading the introduction, but not got to the novel itself yet) HOWARD'S END by EM Forster. I loved Passage To India, and am looking forward to this, what he described as his best novel.

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Momo

8th January 2007 05:50 PM

 

I have just started a German book called “Stinknormal und einfach herrlich”, it's Bianka Bleier who claims to have written an ordinary diary by an ordinary woman. Well, maybe not so ordinary since she has a handicapped child so has to face a lot of problems.

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SlowRain

9th January 2007 05:50 AM

 

Currently Reading

*

Our Man in Havana by Graham Greene.

 

The beginning was a little underdeveloped and the middle has been hit and miss. So far it's okay, but nothing special. I'm wondering if it's not a thrillerized version of The Heart of the Matter

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Hazel

9th January 2007 09:35 AM

 

I started Dead Teachers Don't Talk by David Belbin a couple of nights ago, and yesterday, Dombey & Son by Charles Dickens for through the day. Quite enjoying both, and horrified at the characters in D&S already!

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Krey20

9th January 2007 12:24 PM

 

I finnished Revelation Space which was good but too drawn out.

 

Now started Scar Night - Alan Campbell. the first book in a new fantasy series called the Deepgate Codex. I've read the first few chapters and it looks promising. Campbell has a very descriptive yet easy to read style.

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SlowRain

10th January 2007 01:49 AM

 

 

Finished Our Man in Havana.

 

I just started The Blind Assassin by Margaret Atwood. I usually don't like short, choppy sentences, but, wow, is she ever descriptive.

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Nollaig

11th January 2007 05:04 AM

 

I am reading 'The Historian' by Elizabeth Kostova...

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Stokos

11th January 2007 01:19 PM

Originally Posted by Nollaig

I am reading 'The Historian' by Elizabeth Kostova...

 

Seems there are a few of us at the moment. I'm on page 440 with about a week to go. Its all about vampires, hope that didn't spoil it too much for you.

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mjple

11th January 2007 01:36 PM

 

Should finish "Never let me go tonight" and then will move onto "We need to talk about Kevin" unless "The Children's War" has finally turned up from Amazon in which case that shall be next.

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Momo

11th January 2007 04:22 PM

Originally Posted by Nollaig

I am reading 'The Historian' by Elizabeth Kostova...

 

That's on my TBR pile. If there are so many, I will pick that up soon and contribute to the discussion. We seem to have a little book club there already.

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Hazel

11th January 2007 04:26 PM

 

Started The Butcher Boy by Patrick McCabe at night, and oddly find myself reading in an Irish accent. The writing creates and accomodates the accent perfectly. Well done Mr McCabe.

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katrina

11th January 2007 05:14 PM

 

Starting Nicholas Nickleby later this evening

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Nollaig

12th January 2007 12:57 AM

Originally Posted by Stokos

Seems there are a few of us at the moment. I'm on page 440 with about a week to go. Its all about vampires, hope that didn't spoil it too much for you.

It didn't but thanks for the heads up

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megustaleer

12th January 2007 11:05 AM

 

For those of you reading, or intending to read The Historian, there is a thread on it here

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Momo

12th January 2007 08:19 PM

 

Oh dear, thanks, Meg. The thread's not very encouring. Though, since Mr. In-Between didn't even want to touch it, maybe it's worth reading anyhow. ;)

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chuntzy

13th January 2007 11:36 AM

 

Reading 'Passovotchka' by David Downing. I heard about it on 'A Good Read' and it's about Moscow Dynamos visit to England in 1945. There's social history as well as the football (and how revealing the latter was). Interesting and entertaining.

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Krey20

13th January 2007 10:30 PM

 

Finished Scar Night - Alan Campbell which was excellent. A wonderfully dark, urban fantasy. It's set in a city suspended above an abyss by thousands of chains.

 

Started Recoil - Andy McNab.

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Lady Lazarus

14th January 2007 07:19 PM

 

I finished Howards End yesterday and am now reading A Short History of Nearly Everything. Am 3 chapters in and it's fascinating!

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Crystalwizard

14th January 2007 11:25 PM

 

I had no intention of starting this book, but it had other ideas. I'm currently reading The Wood Beyond the World by William Morris. It's an old old old book and is available to read online if anyone's interested

 

It can be found here:

http://etext.library.adelaide.edu.au/m/morris/william/m87wb/

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Grammath

15th January 2007 01:36 PM

 

Finished "Service with a Smile" over the weekend. I now have a new favourite Wodehouse character, Lord Ickenham - a man with a way with a cunning plan.

 

Now following Iain Banks' travels around Scotland in search of good whisky in "Raw Spirit: In Search of the Perfect Dram". I'm not a whisky drinker particularly, although I won't say no if it is offered, but I am a fan of Mr Banks. The book is quite educational so far. I've learned how to pronounce Islay and Laphroaig already.

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Momo

15th January 2007 03:46 PM

Originally Posted by Crystalwizard

I had no intention of starting this book, but it had other ideas.

:lmao: I love that! You've come to the right place, Kelly.

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minxminnie

15th January 2007 05:26 PM

Originally Posted by Grammath

Now following Iain Banks' travels around Scotland in search of good whisky in "Raw Spirit: In Search of the Perfect Dram". I'm not a whisky drinker particularly, although I won't say no if it is offered, but I am a fan of Mr Banks. The book is quite educational so far. I've learned how to pronounce Islay and Laphroaig already.

I love Iain Banks, and I took this on holiday up north, but it defeated me. I found the writing very self-indulgent, but then I didn't get much further than his waffle about how much he loves his Landrover. Maybe I should give it another go? Or is it very blokey?

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Mungus

15th January 2007 07:05 PM

 

I've just got my copy of Our Mutual Friend. It seems like a lot of us are dabbling with Dickens at the moment, with varying degrees of success. I'm going to learn from these experiences and approach it as it was originally published, in installments. This will let me absorb a bit of easier stuff inbetween times. I hope to manage more than one installment a month though, the thought of having it around the house for twenty months is not appealing!

-------------------------------------------

 

Grammath

16th January 2007 11:56 AM

Originally Posted by minxminnie

I love Iain Banks, and I took this on holiday up north, but it defeated me. I found the writing very self-indulgent, but then I didn't get much further than his waffle about how much he loves his Landrover. Maybe I should give it another go? Or is it very blokey?

I'm on Disc 3 now, and yes, so far it is pretty blokey. With a book like this, where the writer is looking to impart information on a subject he is passionate about and does not want to seem academic, this is perhaps not surprising. This passion is probably also where the element of self-indulgence come from - sometimes Banks seems like he can't believe his luck at being commissioned to write the book.

 

It is definitely the narrative voice that wrote "The Crow Road" and "Complicity".

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Samg

16th January 2007 02:40 PM

 

I'm just coming to the end of Fair Stood the Wind for France, which was the perfect follow-up to Suite Francaise. But by tomorrow I'm going to be mourning for both of them. On Beauty is next, for my book group, which will be a bit of a change of headspace.

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Barblue

18th January 2007 08:36 AM

 

I am currently reading Surface Tension by Joanna Hines. Having just finished Middlemarch this is an easy read. The Preface is beautifully written about a summer idyll in 1976 (Oh! I remember it well) and then cuts to the present day to unravel a murder. I like it because the story moves along quickly. Problem is we are reading uncorrected proofs in our local library reading group and finding errors is a bit of a nuisance.

 

Still, I am also reading Little Dorrit in my spare moments which is keeping me grounded in the 19th Century and I'm loving that. Such a sad story but the humour of the writing is wonderful.

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18th January 2007, 10:54 AM

 

megustaleer

Moderator

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I have now reached the middle of This Thing Of Darkness, and finding it physically easier to handle now both sides are fairly evenly balanced. I expect I'll be grumbling again soon, as the pages I've read will outweigh the pages still to read.

It's a good job I'm enjoying it!

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Hazel

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Deino - the books in your Currently Reading signature have grown increasingly odd over the last few weeks - are they real books or are you patiently waiting, while guffawing your coffee and croissant out, to see if any of us will notice?

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19th January 2007, 08:04 PM

 

Lady Lazarus

Founder Member

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Originally Posted by Hazel

Deino - the books in your Currently Reading signature have grown increasingly odd over the last few weeks - are they real books or are you patiently waiting, while guffawing your coffee and croissant out, to see if any of us will notice?

I noticed this as well, but didn't get round to posting about it - rock-climbing for toddlers??!

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19th January 2007, 10:19 PM

 

Flingo

Subscriber and Permanent Resident

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I was off sick for 3 days at the start of this week - did you know that you can only read a certain number of words in a week before you start to crave something else? I didn't, but I do now!

Having read about 5 books this week, I've now got to plan what to take away with me next week (off for the annual R&R break at my Nan's on Monday).

The TBR is getting well and truly challenged.

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Momo

Subscriber and Permanent Resident

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Originally Posted by Hazel

Deino - the books in your Currently Reading signature have grown increasingly odd over the last few weeks - are they real books or are you patiently waiting, while guffawing your coffee and croissant out, to see if any of us will notice?

That was my thought. I haven't really checked whether they existed or not, yet. But I think, the next time a book like that pops up, I will.

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20th January 2007, 02:30 PM

 

megustaleer

Moderator

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I don't usually read the 'signatures' at the bottom of peoples posts, but after this pointer I think maybe I ought.

 

I have tried to find Cake Decorating In Haiku on Amazon, but they don't seem to have it.

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* #727 *

20th January 2007, 03:44 PM

Crystalwizard

Member

Originally Posted by megustaleer

I have tried to find Cake Decorating In Haiku on Amazon, but they don't seem to have it.

Neither does Google... sounds like a title just waiting to be published

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* #728 *

21st January 2007, 10:04 AM

katrina

Permanent Resident

 

I'm about to start reading Gem Squash Tokolshe by Rachel Zadock as my second book to accompany the tomb which is Nicholas Nickelby.

 

It has to be the most random title (well accept for Deino's choice) but it actually sounds like a great book:

Rachel Zadok's Gem Squash Tokoloshe, a finalist in the Richard and Judy "How to Get Published" competition, takes its title from an incantation uttered by the young white protagonist, Faith, to ward off the Tokoloshe, an evil spirit much feared by black South Africans. The opening half of the novel is set in 1985, when Faith is seven; her father leaves and her mother suffers a breakdown, becoming increasingly obsessed with the black African world of spirits, her tales of which have long terrified her daughter. Faith is a resilient child with a vivid imagination trying to absorb and survive her parents' marital strife and her mother's descent into madness.

In the second half, Faith, now 20, returns after her mother's death to the farm she left as a child, and learns why her mother was incarcerated and she was sent away. The account of Faith's return and the awakening of her memories of the death of the family maid, Nomsa, is vivid, particularly in its description of place. But the suggestion of a spirit world to which black Africans are connected in a way that whites are not, and Faith's spiritual and psychic healing by a black witch doctor, were for this reader a disappointment - perhaps too easy a way to bring about reconciliation with the past.

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Krey20 21st January 2007 01:16 PM

 

Finished Recoil - Andy McNab, his usual good, page turning stuff. Then I whipped through The Boy in Striped Pyjamas - John Boyne. A powerful story that has me quite flustered and confused but excellent nonetheless.

 

Just started Roverandom - J.R.R. Tolkien, for a bit of light relief.

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Momo 21st January 2007 03:07 PM

 

Originally Posted by Crystalwizard

Neither does Google... sounds like a title just waiting to be published.

Maybe that's it. They are all books Deino wants to write next. We really should have copied those titles ... :thinking:

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mandyo 21st January 2007 04:42 PM

 

Has anyone out there read `wicked`by gregory maguire? Going to see the show next month in the west end.Show has excellent reviews, just wondering if the book compares.Appreciate any advice. Ta.

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Hazel 22nd January 2007 04:11 PM

 

I started Middlemarch by George Eliot this morning. This book for as long as I can remember has been my Everest - the mountain not the double glazing. And finally I have gotten round to it at the grand old age of mumble. And not under my own steam, oh no, as requested by university. Quite enjoying it actually and it is terribly amusing. I love pompous asses.

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Brightphoebus 22nd January 2007 05:21 PM

I'm just on the point of finishing Carry Me Down by M.J. Hyland. It was long or shortlisted for the Booker / Costa, I think. I may be a year out, I usually am.

 

It's a bit 'Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night Time'-like. It's written in the present tense from the point of view of a young lad who is socially awkward and very tall for his 11 years which makes him a bit of a freak in the eyes of others. He is observant of adult behaviour, in particular the lies adults perpetrate, whilst at the same time missing the most obvious social clues and provoking adults into frustration and despair by his own speech and actions - not that they don't have enough despair of their own to deal with.

 

It's set in Ireland in the 1970's. One of the reasons I'm upstairs typing this instead of doing my duty and READING for goodness sake, is that it's a very uncomfortable read and I can't see it ending well.

 

Perhaps I'll find a drain to clear out / hoover the house / prepare some work for tomorrow / make the dinner.

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Momo 22nd January 2007 06:33 PM

 

Originally Posted by Hazel

I started Middlemarch by George Eliot this morning. This book for as long as I can remember has been my Everest - the mountain not the double glazing. And finally I have gotten round to it at the grand old age of mumble. And not under my own steam, oh no, as requested by university. Quite enjoying it actually and it is terribly amusing. I love pompous asses.

Oh, I hope you like it. I love that book. It's a great story and great writing!

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minxminnie 22nd January 2007 06:54 PM

 

Have just finished Q&A by Vikas Swarup. I won't bother starting a thread on it, I just thought I'd say that it's sort of fat-free Rohinton Mistry - a lighter version of that great man. It would be a good novel to read if you didn't know much about India, but it really is very lightweight.

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22nd January 2007, 07:47 PM

 

Mungus

Subscriber

Originally Posted by minxminnie

Have just finished Q&A by Vikas Swarup. I won't bother starting a thread on it, I just thought I'd say that it's sort of fat-free Rohinton Mistry - a lighter version of that great man. It would be a good novel to read if you didn't know much about India, but it really is very lightweight.

 

I started a thread here when I read this book. I agree that it is lightweight, but I thought it was a lot of fun.

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minxminnie

Subscriber

Originally Posted by Mungus

I started a thread here when I read this book. I agree that it is lightweight, but I thought it was a lot of fun.

Thanks, Mungus - I had looked but couldn't find a thread.

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23rd January 2007, 08:07 AM

 

Krey20

Subscriber

 

Finished Roverandom - J.R.R. Tolkien. A wonderfully charming story. Written for one of his sons when he lost his favourite toy dog on holiday.

 

I've decided to carry on with Tolkien, but I don't want anything to heavy, so I'm reading Tales from the Perilous Realm, which features four other short stories by Tolkien. Farmer Giles of Ham, The Adventures of Tom Bombadil, Leaf by Niggle and Smith of Wooton Major.

 

I dare say all of these are supposed to children's stories but I'm still completely transported by them.

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23rd January 2007, 08:52 AM

 

Hazel

Subscriber and Resident

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Started Thomas Cook's Red Leaves last night.

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23rd January 2007, 01:45 PM

 

Brightphoebus

Subscriber

Originally Posted by Hazel

Started Thomas Cook's Red Leaves last night.

Are you reading it in tandem with Middlemarch?

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Hazel

Subscriber and Resident

Originally Posted by Brightphoebus

Are you reading it in tandem with Middlemarch?

MM during the day, and Red Leaves at night time. Very hard to take notes lying in bed so uni books are strictly daytime material.

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23rd January 2007, 05:29 PM

 

minxminnie

Subscriber

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Originally Posted by Hazel

Started Thomas Cook's Red Leaves last night.

Me, too! Spooky. I only bought it because of the BGO discussion on the cover, so it caught my attention in Borders.

Mind you, I only managed to read the first few pages.

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* #743 *

23rd January 2007, 06:50 PM

Jane Nadia

Senior Member

 

Just started to read 'Brick Lane' by Monica Ali. The fact of it starting with the birth of the central character has just reminded me of Kate Atkinson's 'Behind the Scenes at the Museum'...

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Adrian

Subscriber

Originally Posted by minxminnie

Me, too! Spooky. I only bought it because of the BGO discussion on the cover, so it caught my attention in Borders.

Mind you, I only managed to read the first few pages.

And I've just started it as well after reading about it here (it's not that great of a coincidence I guess).

 

It's started well, especially with the second-person introduction.

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24th January 2007, 10:08 AM

 

Hazel

Subscriber and Resident

 

 

I bought it because of the discussion about the cover too - and it looked like an interesting crime book. Easy reading. Hopefully, once we are all done we will get a good discussion going about it as for once a lot of us are reading the same thing!

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24th January 2007, 05:41 PM

 

minxminnie

Subscriber

Originally Posted by Adrian

And I've just started it as well after reading about it here (it's not that great of a coincidence I guess).

No, just because we started in the same day - I read about it on BGO back before Christmas.

I'm really enjoying it so far - maybe we should start a thread?

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24th January 2007, 08:24 PM

 

Mungus

Subscriber

 

I read Red Leaves late last year after the cover discussions. Will post my thoughts on the new thread once I've dredged my memory. I'm currently whizzing my happy way through a Jack Reacher (Persuader). It's fab.

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* #748 *

25th January 2007, 03:06 AM

SlowRain

Member

 

 

The Hobbit by J.R.R. Tolkien

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5th January 2007, 10:40 AM

 

Hazel

Subscriber and Resident

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Originally Posted by Mungus

I'm currently whizzing my happy way through a Jack Reacher (Persuader). It's fab.

 

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* #750 *

28th January 2007, 06:39 PM

Kaz

Member

 

 

I almost finished Jonathan Strange and Mr Norrell. Can't wait to finish it. It took me forever reading. I stop read it end of summer to read other books so I am determind to finish it off. That mean I can enjoying to read other book. My other book is The Innocent by Harlan Coben which I started last week.

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28th January 2007, 07:05 PM

 

megustaleer

Moderator

 

I have finally finished This Thing Of Darkness by Harry Thompson. I am just starting a million little pieces by James Frey...only a year or so after everyone else!!

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28th January 2007, 07:38 PM

 

Momo

Subscriber and Permanent Resident

 

 

Just finished My Name is Red by Orhan Pamuk. It was absolutely wonderful, I will start a thread on it.

Now I'm on to our next book club read: Ensemble c’est tout (Hunting and Gathering) by Anna Gavalda. It starts rather lame, let's see whether it improves.

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29th January 2007, 09:31 AM

 

Hazel

Subscriber and Resident

 

I started The Stolen Child, by Keith Donohue last night. Quite an interesting start and I am hooked. How can you go wrong with an opening line "Don't call me a fairy."?

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9th January 2007, 01:26 PM

 

Grammath

Subscriber and Founder Member

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Taking a breather from "Anna Karenina", which I'm just over halfway through, with some non-fiction - "Blair's Wars" by John Kampfner, the political editor of the "New Statesman". Its an overivew of how the PM has managed to take the country to war five times whilst he's been in charge, more often than any of his predecessors.

 

I've also finished "Raw Spirit" on audiobook, and considering either "That Old Ace in the Hole" by E Annie Proulx, "Starter for Ten" by David Nicholls or Henning Mankell's "Before the Frost" next.

 

The sadistic librarian who runs the RL reading group I belong to has given us the theme of fake Victorian novels for February, the problem being most of the books on the list are huge, a particular problem since I want to finish a genuine Victorian novel first! Might have to blag my way through since "Crimson Petal" is on the list. There's also assorted Sarah Waters novels, Charles Palliser's "The Quincunx", Peter Carey's "Jack Maggs" and DJ Taylor's "Kept" on the list.

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29th January 2007, 02:49 PM

 

Krey20

Subscriber

 

Started Mr. Midshipman Hornblower - C.S. Forester.

 

So far it's lighter than the Patrick O'Brien sea novels I'm used to, it's faster with more "adventure."

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29th January 2007, 03:08 PM

 

Brightphoebus

Subscriber

Originally Posted by Grammath

The sadistic librarian who runs the RL reading group I belong to has given us the theme of fake Victorian novels for February, the problem being most of the books on the list are huge, ... Charles Palliser's "The Quincunx"...

This is a GREAT book, G, but, yes, VAST!

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anuary 2007, 03:41 PM

 

megustaleer

Moderator

Originally Posted by Krey20

Started Mr. Midshipman Hornblower - C.S. Forester.

 

So far it's lighter than the Patrick O'Brien sea novels I'm used to, it's faster with more "adventure."

 

If you enjoy sea novels, let me recommend the book I'm currently raving about: This Thing of Darkness by Harry Thompson.

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Momo

Subscriber and Permanent Resident

Originally Posted by Grammath

Taking a breather from "Anna Karenina", which I'm just over halfway through, ...

Grammath, you read the most wonderful books. I really enjoyed this one. It's a tough one with all those Russian names and connections but there was some great information about that at Oprah's.

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9th January 2007, 06:34 PM

 

Grammath

Subscriber and Founder Member

 

Its nice that you think that, Momo, but I do read some utter tosh too! If only life was full of 5-star reads.... [insert wistful smiley here].

 

I am finding "Anna Karenina" even better than I was expecting, but my attention span just isn't long enough to read an 800 page classic from beginning to end without taking a break to read something totally different.

 

Brightphoebus, "The Quincunx" has been bending my bookshelf since I picked up a 2nd hand copy whilst in Hay-on-Wye for the festival last summer. Michel Faber cited it as a major influence on "Crimson Petal & the White" in an interview with him that I read, which was a good enough recommendation for me. However, there's no way I could read it in a month.

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9th January 2007, 06:43 PM

 

Brightphoebus

Subscriber

Originally Posted by Grammath

However, there's no way I could read it in a month.

Save it for your summer holiday, maybe? I'm always trying to do that but somehow other books come along and there is always an uneven struggle. I don't know why, because I should be in charge, not the books!

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Mungus

Subscriber

 

Large books are a blessing and a curse. If they are good, they just keep giving - a blessing. If they are hard work, it can be a real slog, even if the story ultimately makes it worthwhile. I don't have much on my TBR pile (compared to others here ) but those that linger tend to be the weightier tomes.

 

I'm reading Our Mutual Friend at the moment, it's my 'day time' book. I have decided to allow myself a 'night time' book for, well, bed but also for train journeys. It seems to be working.

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Momo

Subscriber and Permanent Resident

Originally Posted by Grammath

Its nice that you think that, Momo, but I do read some utter tosh too! If only life was full of 5-star reads.... [insert wistful smiley here].

Don't we all - read some rubbish and wish for 5-star reads?

Originally Posted by Mungus

Large books are a blessing and a curse.

The largest curse is that it is even harder to say good-bye to them than to others. I love large books.

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#763 *

30th January 2007, 05:11 AM

SlowRain

Member

 

I'm currently reading December 6 by Martin Cruz Smith

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30th January 2007, 08:26 AM

 

Krey20

Subscriber

*

Originally Posted by megustaleer

If you enjoy sea novels, let me recommend the book I'm currently raving about: This Thing of Darkness by Harry Thompson.

Thanks for the link meg. This thread has excited my interest and also serves as a moving tribute to the author, I'll certainly be adding this to my wishlist.

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minxminnie

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Just started Frankie and Stankie by Barbara Trapido. quite liking it so far.

However, I've also just heard that my department is to be inspected by HMI (=Ofsted), so I don't think there will be much reading for me for a few weeks!

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30th January 2007, 08:38 PM

katrina

Permanent Resident

 

 

Ofsted good luck, they visited us before xmas it was horrible! Although it did seem to wake all the staff up and give the place a bit of a buzz in the run up to it.

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30th January 2007, 09:16 PM

 

minxminnie

Subscriber

Originally Posted by katrina

Ofsted good luck, they visited us before xmas it was horrible! Although it did seem to wake all the staff up and give the place a bit of a buzz in the run up to it.

Thanks, Katrina! Yes, it certainly woke me up this morning and gave me a buzz I could do without!

Add to that the fact that one of my staff is off, leaving me with a 4th yr class (=Yr 11) with a folio of coursework to finish for the end of Feb , and I'm not having a good day.

But I think I'll open a new thread for related girning! (Sorry, scottish for, em, whingeing.)

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#768 *

31st January 2007, 04:47 PM

FirelightSpirit

Member

 

I'm ashamed to say I've only just gotten around to reading Dickens. I'm two-thirds of the way through Bleak House and loving every minute of it.

 

After that it'll be Mark Danielewski's House of Leaves, which looks kinda weird...

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31st January 2007, 08:33 PM

 

Krey20

Subscriber

 

Finished Mr. Midshipman Hornblower - C.S. Forester which was really good fun, full of adventure, not as heavy as O'Brien but not better either.

 

Just started JPod - Douglas Coupland. I'm hoping for a good "nerdy" comedy as it's described. I haven't tackled Coupland before but I've heard he's quite high profile for his observations on modern life. Nice to be reading an author that is completely new to me, I've got that excited feeling because I don't know what it'll be like.

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1st February 2007, 02:56 PM

 

Stokos

Subscriber

 

The wizards and the warriors: Hugh Cook

 

A re-read of one of the first fantasy books I ever read. I am amazed at how much I remember.

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1st February 2007, 10:34 PM

 

Lady Lazarus

Founder Member

 

Just finished The Complete History of Nearly Everything by Bill Bryson, and am about to start a play by Tom Stoppard (a first for me!): Rosencrantz and Guilderstern are Dead ( think!)

 

incidentally, I have moved house now and will not have any broadband internet for another three weeks, so will be popping in here only sporadically, as my pesky dial-up allows...

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* #772 *

2nd February 2007, 08:04 AM

 

Brightphoebus

Originally Posted by Lady Lazarus

incidentally, I have moved house now and will not have any broadband internet for another three weeks, so will be popping in here only sporadically, as my pesky dial-up allows...

Congratulations on your move, LL. I hope it didn't involve too much hair pulling and knashing of teeth and the glitches in your new place are not too alarming

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2nd February 2007, 09:28 AM

 

Royal Rother

Founder Member

*

The Gunslinger (Dark Tower 1) - Stephen King

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My Friend Jack

Moderator

 

The Damned United - David Peace

 

See thread in Sport section (although it's a work of fiction, you'll find Sport under non-fiction).

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2nd February 2007, 12:12 PM

 

Momo

Subscriber and Permanent Resident

Originally Posted by Lady Lazarus

incidentally, I have moved house now and will not have any broadband internet for another three weeks, so will be popping in here only sporadically, as my pesky dial-up allows...

Is it a manor house or a castle, both of which you'd be lucky to have electricity.

Anyway, all the best in your new house. Hope the move went smoothly and you will find yourself comfortable soon.

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2nd February 2007, 01:12 PM

 

chuntzy

Subscriber

 

 

Have just finished The Story of Israel by Jeremy Gavron and, in contrast, have started John Connelly's The Concrete Blonde.

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2nd February 2007, 01:17 PM

 

Hazel

Subscriber and Resident

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Originally Posted by chuntzy

have started John Connelly's The Concrete Blonde.

Michael Connelly? Very good book Chuntzy, enjoy.

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#778 *

 

chuntzy

Subscriber

Originally Posted by Hazel

Michael Connelly? Very good book Chuntzy, enjoy.

Had never heard of him Hazel until one of your recco's. V.G. so far. Thanks.

(Yes, Michael it is of course not John)

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2nd February 2007, 02:15 PM

 

Royal Rother

Founder Member

*

But I've literally littered the board with my recommendations for Michael Connelly's books, and you've not seen mine? Pah!

 

Best cop writer around IMHO.

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2nd February 2007, 02:37 PM

 

chuntzy

Subscriber

*

Originally Posted by Royal Rother

But I've literally littered the board with my recommendations for Michael Connelly's books, and you've not seen mine? Pah!

 

Best cop writer around IMHO.

Oh, RoyalRother, like the song says 'it must have been you'! on the Crime section etc. Well, you did me a favour!

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megustaleer

Moderator

 

About to start Sugar Street by Naguib Mahfouz

 

It is one from my postal bookgroup, and I'm not looking forward to it, as a quick look at Amazon led me to this review:

This is the third book in the Cairo Trilogy Series. By all means, do NOT try to read this book without having read Palace Walk or Palace of Desire FIRST--it would be like tuning in to a movie in the last half hour.

We have not read the first two

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Mungus

Subscriber

 

 

Hmmm, that's annoying, isn't it Meg? Makes me think that while a trilogy should continue a story, with some of the same characters, locations, whatever, each book should stand up in its own right, otherwise, it's a bit of a swizz. Good luck.

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Royal Rother

Founder Member

Originally Posted by chuntzy

Oh, RoyalRother, like the song says 'it must have been you'! on the Crime section etc. Well, you did me a favour!

With The Concrete Blonde you've started with Connelly's 3rd Harry Bosch novel. I suggest you go back to the start and read the 1st 2 next, and then all his output in sequence because as the series goes on (even those that don't feature Bosch) there are little references to common cases / people popping up and crossing over all over the place and it's quite fun picking up on those. Obviously you'll miss out on a lot of those if you haven't read the books in order.

 

Connelly is becoming very prolific, which is good, and there have only been a couple that I have been a bit disappointed by.

 

http://www.michaelconnelly.com/Book...collection.html

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784 *

 

katrina

Permanent Resident

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I've just started The Snow Flower and the Secret Fan bu Lisa See, a book that I brought my mum for xmas and she sent it home with me as she has about 8 other books she hasn't read. She thinks thats a lot of unread books, she's never got my need to have a large tbr pile.

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785 *

Today, 05:55 PM

 

Grammath

Subscriber and Founder Member

 

My new audiobook is Henning Mankell's "Before the Frost", his only novel (so far) to feature Linda, the daughter of his regular cop, Kurt Wallender, who in this has just joined the Ystad police force where her father works. However, it still has the bleak glumness of much of Mankell's work. That's those knockabout Scandanavian crime writers for you, I guess.

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chuntzy

Subscriber

Originally Posted by Royal Rother

With The Concrete Blonde you've started with Connelly's 3rd Harry Bosch novel. I suggest you go back to the start and read the 1st 2 next, and then all his output in sequence because as the series goes on (even those that don't feature Bosch) there are little references to common cases / people popping up and crossing over all over the place and it's quite fun picking up on those. Obviously you'll miss out on a lot of those if you haven't read the books in order.

 

Connelly is becoming very prolific, which is good, and there have only been a couple that I have been a bit disappointed by.

 

http://www.michaelconnelly.com/Book...collection.html

Bookmarked already! thanks for the suggestion as well.

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787 *

Today, 07:???????????57 PM

 

Royal Rother

Founder Member

 

Just to expand on my point re slight disappointment, there was a fairly recent Bosch novel that was written in the 1st person. Considering he had spent about 10 books building him up as a character who seemed about as likely to sit down and write a book as Paul Gascoigne, it seemed a very strange move. Whilst the plotting was fine (I think), I just couldn't get past my initial reaction of "What the hell...?". Thankfully he has reverted to normal narrative since then.

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Momo

Subscriber and Permanent Resident

Originally Posted by megustaleer

About to start Sugar Street by Naguib Mahfouz

It is one from my postal bookgroup, and I'm not looking forward to it, as a quick look at Amazon led me to this review:We have not read the first two

Who on earth decides to read the third book of a trilogy in a book club?

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megustaleer

Moderator

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Join Date: Jan 2005

Location: Essex, UK

Posts: 4,276

 

Somebody who ought to know better, as she's been a member longer than I have!

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* #788 *

Yesterday, 04:58 AM

SlowRain

Member

* Reading

 

The Age of Innocence by Edith Wharton

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Lady Lazarus

Founder Member

 

I started The Curious Incident of The Dog in the Night-Time today, and couldn't put it down, really enjoying it so far.

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There are about 4 posts missing from the end of this page

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restored (original page 54)

 

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Yesterday, 12:02 PM

 

Hazel

Subscriber and Resident

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I started to read The Last King of Scotland by Giles Foden last night. Good start. If I can't get to the flicks then I can certainly read the book. Though that means missing out on the lovely James McAvoy...and an Oscar nominated performance from Forest blah blah blah...

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Yesterday, 01:00 PM

FirelightSpirit

Member

 

Finished Bleak House last Saturday and boy will it be a hard act to follow.

 

I'm reading House of Leaves at home because it's way too big to bring on the train. It's very intellectual, but interesting.

 

For the commute I've got Hardy's Far From the Madding Crowd, which is completely different.

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Yesterday, 09:12 PM

 

minxminnie

Subscriber

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Slow progress, but I'm enjoying Frankie and Stankie by Barbara Trapido.

It gives an insight into the history of 20th C South Africa, largely from the viewpoint of two children of white liberals. It's interesting from that point of view, and the characterisation of the vast range of characters is excellent.

What annoys me a bit is the 3rd person present tense style. It is carefully crafted, but something about the present tense sounds like telling rather than showing. Don't know if it has this effect on anyone else - maybe I've just read too many bad stories by pupils which use this device badly, but it grates.

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chuntzy

Subscriber

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Join Date: Oct 2006

Location: South Yorkshire

Posts: 673

Originally Posted by Hazel

Oh, I just bought that - love the idea that 'Death' is the narrator. Let me know what you think and I may bump it up a few places!

I'm half way through. It's the U.S hardback edition. On the flyleaf with the ISBN no. I noticed before I started "1. Germany-History-1933-1945- Juvenile fiction." First barrier for me to overcome- 'juvenile'. I don't do 'juvenile'.

Then it says "2. Books and reading-Fiction" then "3. Storytelling-Fiction" followed by "4. Death-Fiction" then "5. Jews-Germany-History-1933-1945-Fiction" and finally "6. World War,1939-1945-Jews-Rescue-Fiction."

 

For goodness sake!

 

If I finish it, Hazel. I'll report.

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Today, 01:31 PM

 

Lady Lazarus

Founder Member

 

I'm reading Arthur & George by Julian Barnes. After about 30 pages, I quite like it. Not read anything else by him so wil be interested to see how it goes.

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This is the nearest post to the crash date that I can find! I will now start adding the post-crash posts, to get one (almost) continuous thread.

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