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Currently trying to motivate myself to start: White Darkness by Geraldine McCaughrean

 

I've given up - although I have been assured it is a great book (and highly likely that it will end up on out shortlist) I cannot seem to get myself past the cover.

 

Hopefully will have better luck with Seeker - William Nicholson

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Having just finished We Wish to Inform You...by Philip Gourevitch, after a glowing recommendation here and have to say it was an astounding book, I started Jekyll & Hyde last night. However, this morning my lovely postie delivered My Friend Leonard by James Frey so J&H will be put to one side today while I attempt to read this book in one sitting. BGOers will know how much I loved his first A Million Little Pieces and how I excited I am today!!!

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(Well done, Bernadette - I think I've only read about half of them in my life - let alone all in one year!)

 

I finished Seeker (Nicholson), and have also read Framed by Frank Cotrell Boyce.

 

Have just started: Operation Red Jericho by Joshua Mowll. This will be the last children's read for the mo, I think (see my latest "I have just bought/borrowed post" for more info!).

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(Well done, Bernadette - I think I've only read about half of them in my life - let alone all in one year!)

 

Thank you, though, "Sense and Sensibility" is by far the most difficult Austen I've read yet. And I'm not sure why!

 

I breezed through "Pride and Prejudice, Persuasion, Emma and Northanger Abbey" but I find myself having to go back and reread pages of S+S because I'm not getting it the first time. Maybe my brain is experiencing an Austen overload! :)

 

Best regards!

Bernadette

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Ditto with me last night - read about half of Salem Falls (Jodi Picoult) and realised it was 2.30am!

 

Salem Falls is very near the top of my TBR list, sounds like it could be moving up a bit further up if it kept you reading until that time.

 

I am engrossed in "We need to talk about Kevin" by Lionel Shriver. I found it a bit slow to start, but I am really enjoying it now.

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donnae - please add your comments about Salem Falls (here) when you've read it, and add your comments to Kevin (here) when you have finished.

 

I'm going to start the other Tess Gerritsen series tonight - starting with Bloodstream - another author I can lose sleep over!!!

 

Where is the Zombie smilie?

 

(Any chance this thread can be stickied as it keeps us up to date about what we are all up to, and there is always a flurry of responses when someone adds to it and it's bumped up to the top?)

(Also could be stiched with Abbynormals Current Reading as part of the tidy up?)

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Fantastic - ta muchly, Meg!

 

Have finished Bloodstream already - off to start a thread on it in the Crime board.

 

Will be starting Under the Duvet (written or compiled?) by Marian Keyes next for some light-hearted relief from these gory and draining crime novels!

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Hi everyone,

Am new to this! I have just finished Archangel by Robert Harris which I quite enjoyed. Am about to start Case Histories by Kate Atkinson, has anyone read it?

 

 

Hi Rebecca,

 

Enjoyed Archangle when I read it a few years ago. It's a good thriller. As for "Case Histories", I read it during the summer and really liked it a lot. You have a treat in store - enjoy! By the way, there are some other posts about it around somewhere if you are interested. Let us know what you think.

 

I am reading "The Buffalo Soldier "by ChrisBohjalian at the moment. It's not bad but I am expecting it to get better.

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Hi everyone,

Am new to this! I have just finished Archangel by Robert Harris which I quite enjoyed. Am about to start Case Histories by Kate Atkinson, has anyone read it?

 

Rebecca, a huge welcome to you. I hope you enjoy it here. We're all very friendly!

 

As gerbooks says, there is a thread of Case Histories, which inspired me to read it. It was the most enjoyable book I've read this year. The thread, which is in the forum 21st Century Books, can be found by clicking this link.

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Currently reading:

Brideshead Revisited, by Evelyn Waugh.

Our Hidden Lives, edited by Simon Garfield

and Transforming Priesthood by Robin Greenwood

 

It's not quite working somehow, I can't settle properly to any of them :rolleyes:

 

 

(Good to see you back, Colinj :) )

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I am doing something I have never done in my life before reading two books at the same time!

 

As well as Keyes' - "Under the Duvet", I am also reading "Elsewhere" by Gabrielle Zevin. You can dip in and out of the Keyes - it is in lots of distinct sections (being a collection of her articles and short stories and journal entries) so it's not too confusing! I needed a slim paperback to take on the train with me yesterday - so the Zevin fit the bill. Only read a few chapters but very moved so far!

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Lady Chatterley's Lover - DH Lawrence, just because i never got around to reading it before, and wanted to see what all the fuss was about. Guess it was racy at the time then......

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I've found some of the missing pages, and will try to slot them in here in chronological order.

 

17th December 2005

Phoebus

Subscriber

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Cosmestic of the Enemy by Amélie Nothomb.

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Stewart

Resident

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Oranges Are Not The Only Fruit, Jeanette Winterson

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*Flingo

Subscriber and Permanent Resident

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Over the festive season so far I have read:

 

Boy A - Jonathan Triggell

Vanishing Acts - Jodi Picoult

 

and am now reading:

 

Driving Over Lemons - Chris Stewart

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#60 *

28th December 2005, 11:29 PM

 

Momo 28th December 2005

Subscriber and Permanent Resident

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Flingo,

I liked that story, one of the nicer ones of people buying a house in Southern Europe and trying to make a living there.

I'm just reading "Once in a house on fire" by Andrea Ashworth, a story about the author's life growing up in the seventies in a poor family in Manchester. Very gripping.

 

MLei-Lei Jayenne

Founder Member

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Persian Fire by Tom Holland

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Bill

Admin

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My bedtime reading is currently Eve Green by Susan Fletcher, and in between times it's Set Up Joke, Set Up Joke by Rob Long, which is the other book I got for Christmas which I forgot to list in the Christmas Presents thread. Long is a former Cheers writer who's been trying to create a hit sitcom ever since. Most of them have only lasted one season, and this is his very funny inside account of the US TV system. Makes the British one seem relatively sane - on second thoughts, nothing could do that.

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Adrian

Subscriber

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Bill, I just finished Conversations With My Agent, by Rob Long. It's about his time writing Pig Sty, for the US cable channel UPN.

 

I didn't find it intriguing enough to start a thread about. Good read from the library, but not to buy. As a successful writer (and also, producer, and don't you forget it!) I couldn't feel sorry for him. Since then, with Men, Women and Dogs, what more does he want?

 

I'm now going to watch the documentary "Action".

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Phoebus

Subscriber

:Originally Posted by Bill

My bedtime reading is currently Eve Green by Susan Fletcher...

I bought this just before it won the Whitbread First Novel Award for 2004 but it did little for me. There were a few good passages such as when Eve is lifted over the style which put a shiver down my spine but I still don't understand what all the fuss was about.

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Phoebus

Subscriber

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Saga by Tonino Benacquista

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Momo

Subscriber and Permanent Resident

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Dust to Dust by Timothy Findley

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Flingo

Subscriber and Permanent Resident

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Possession has been put to one side for the long weekend, while I read Inkspell by Cornelia Funke (a christmas pressie).

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Momo

Subscriber and Permanent Resident

 

Just started "Dust to Dust" by Canadian author Timothy Findley, a collection of short stories. A present from a friend who knows I'm not too keen on short stories. She thought I might like these - and I do, so far.

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Phoebus

Subscriber

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White City Blue by Tim Lott

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* #70 *

Grammath

Subscriber and Founder Member

:Originally Posted by Phoebus

White City Blue by Tim Lott

 

Ooh, what a fab book, let me know what you think.

 

I finally finished "Wolves of the Calla", Volume 5 of Stephen King's "The Dark Tower", yesterday after having taken a long break from the saga, and cruised straight into Volume 6 "Song of Susannah".

 

My current audiobooks is Matthew Kneale's "English Passengers". Its one of those multiple narrator jobbies a la "Cloud Atlas", partly set in Tasmania in the 1820s and 1830s (or Van Diemen's Land as it was at the time), but also on a later (1850s) voyage there from Britain. I'm about half way through and at the moment each element it seems very disconnected. Sure it'll come together

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Momo

Subscriber and Permanent Resident

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:Originally Posted by Grammath

My current audiobooks is Matthew Kneale's "English Passengers". Its one of those multiple narrator jobbies a la "Cloud Atlas", partly set in Tasmania in the 1820s and 1830s (or Van Diemen's Land as it was at the time), but also on a later (1850s) voyage there from Britain. I'm about half way through and at the moment each element it seems very disconnected. Sure it'll come together.

 

I read this book when it first received the Whitbread Award. I had the same feeling you did and, to be honest, it didn't come together, at least not for me. I usually like these kind of books although this was a book club read but I might have picked it up myself. The only thing I did afterwards? I just asked myself the big question: why did this book get the award, what are their reasons for choosing this one?

I am reading a German book right now, has not been translated, but for those of you who do read German, it is called "Brennholz fuer Kartoffelschalen" by Horst Bosetzky who normally writes crime stories. This one is a story about a boy growing up in Berlin after WWII, based on his own life. Quite interesting because he manages to give the boy's point of view on everything, school, other children, adults, the bombings during the war, his father being a prisoner of war in Russia though his whole family had opposed the Nazis etc. Very good language, too, I often cannot get into German books that well (despite being German) because I read more English books. But I like this one - so far.

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?th January 2006, 06:20 PM

 

Phoebus

Subscriber

 

I'm also listening to an unnabridged version of Jonathan Strange & Mr Norrell by Susanna Clarke on CD. 26 CDs in fact !

 

It's not a book I would have read or listened to but I saw on another site that the price of the pack was only £5 on Amazon. Probably a mitake because the price went up to £70 the following day. I'm enjoying it, though, and whilst I don't generally like fantasy stories, her pace and descriptions are really very good.

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#73 *

9th January 2006, 07:07 PM

 

Kats

Member

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Currently finishing off The Dark Is Rising by Susan Cooper.

 

And trying to get through Guns, Germs and Steel by Jared Diamond for a book group.

 

Then I can start on The Eyre Affair by Jasper Fforde, which I am really looking forward to.

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* #74 *

9th January 2006, 09:46 PM

 

Stewart

Resident

 

That's a shame. Oracle Night has been my introduction to Paul Auster and I really enjoyed it.

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* #75 *

 

Hazel

Subscriber and Resident

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:Originally Posted by Stewart

That's a shame. Oracle Night has been my introduction to Paul Auster and I really enjoyed it

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Oddly my introduction to Paul Auster was True Tales of American Life which he didn't write but edited. It was a fab collection of tales of ordinary people across America, in their own words and was initially a radio project for Auster if memory serves. I then went on to read alot of his actual novels and Oracle Night is one of my favourites. The Book of Illusions is good also.

 

Currently reading The Republic of Trees by Sam Taylor. It's about 4 adolescent children who run away from their families to live in the forest in order to create a kind of utopia based on The Social Contract by Jean Jacques Rousseau. So far so good though I suspect a few Lord of the Flies moments.

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Hazel

Subscriber and Resident

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:Originally Posted by Leese

 

Hazel, I see you've got the Stephen Fry listed in your sig - any good? He's one of those people that I love to watch and listen to, but I've been unable to get into his writing so far.

 

Oh it's nothing like his fiction novels, which can be a bit blah, but it explains poetry very well and I think I have learnt more from his book than 3 years at the OU! I wish he wrote the course materials for the OU poetry sections. He writes with enthusiasm and really does break alot of technical stuff down to everyday terms and basic diagrams so that you understand.

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