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What films have you seen recently?

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What did people find in this film?

 

It was, quite truthfully, a magical experience for me.

 

I walked out of the cinema dark with both my head and my heart spinning.

 

There were so many surrealistic and beautiful words and sounds and ideas that came out of that interpretation of his life.. in its stages.

 

I wondered if anyone felt the same?

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Hi, Lerida.

 

I went to the cinema to see "I'm Not There" at the beginning of the year. My thoughts on it are further back in this thread. To save you hunting it down, here's a link to my post.

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Watched All The Boys Love Mandy Lane last night, it sounds like a teen romp, but actually not a bad little slasher/horror flick. Teen are involved - it's a sort of Friday 13th for the modern age with more than a goodly dose of Carrie influencing the music, cinematography and plot. Don't worry though - it's a subtle nod.

 

Mandy Lane, orphan and hot babe, is the most desirable girl at school. All the boys want to 'get' her. But maybe because she is an orphan, or maybe because she has been raised by her aunt well, she isn't interested and doesn't kiss, doesn't...y'know. Her best friend, Emmet, is a cool, geeky, kind of emo kid, and the two of them become estranged after a pool party ends in tragedy. Mandy eventually joins the cool set and off they go to an isolated ranch for some fun and frolics. 3 boys and 3 girls - 2 of the girls being completely superfluous as far as the 3 boys are concerned. Of course, there is a odd ranch-hand hanging about that Mandy also 'clicks' with.

 

You can guess the rest, mostly. One by one the teens meet sticky ends, and unusually you find out who the perpetrator is halfway through. It won't spoil your enjoyment of the film though. The denouement makes up for plot predictability throughout.

 

It's a satisfying slasher flick, the first half though doesn't quite know if it is a film or a pop video, and that really irritated me - long posed montages of beautiful kids and sun, with too-loud musical accompaniment. But once the action kicks in, that thankfully disappears.

 

I think with horror flicks there has to be a more complex rating system, so,

1 star for scares (there isn't any really), 3 stars for the gore factor, and 3 stars overall.

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yesterday i saw swing vote in the cinema. this stars kevin costner. one guy just trying to raise his daughter, find a job and pick the next president of the usa. it was actually quite good. it showed how the press people where willing to sell out the core beliefs of a candidate to try to get them elected. the democrat (dennis hooper) was portrayed as being out of touch while the republican (kelsey grammar) was portrayed as being dumb. all in all, i thought it was excellent

 

the previous week, i saw in the cinema: hellboy II the story of a boy from hell trying to save the world. nice, light hearted and good

 

and then on dvd the day before i saw hellboy II, i watch dreams that money can buy. this is an avant-garde film from the 1940's which recently had it's soundtrack revamped by the real tuesday weld. an excellent, an excellent film soundtrack

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Last night, I stuck on Knocked Up to make my mind of my looming exam today. Hubby put this on the rental list, not my choice at all, which is ironic as I loved it.

 

Ben Stone (Seth Rogen) and Allison Scott (Katherine Heigl) meet in a club and get very drunk. They end up having, what is intended as, a one night stand, however Allison falls pregnant and these two very different people end up having to have some sort of relationship. Ben like his name suggests is a stoner: high all the time, a slacker, unemployed and currently working on a website that lists the nude scenes of actresses in films. Ben appears to live with a whole clutch of his slacker mates - all social outcasts of one type or another. Allison, works at E!, a T.V. channel, and has just been promoted to conduct interviews with celebs on air. She lives in the poolhouse of her married-with-kids sister.

 

Most of the humour is very typical of the male slacker type movie, and they try to get in as many

bushes, boobs, cock, and f**k

words as possible. I'll admit that I laughed at most of their jokes. One line of jokes in particular that centre around taking the mickey of their mate that they bet won't shave or cut his hair for a year are particularly amusing.

 

But when these jokes and male camaraderie fall away, we are actually left with a really touching tale of a couple coming to terms with the impending parenthood. There are a lot of truisms in both the fledging relationship and in the more mature marriage of Allison's sister. The film really examines what marriage and kids do to a couple and how the gender divide affects how each perceive the marriage. Predictably, hubby and I argued about certain points "whose side are you on? do you think she's right?".

 

I enjoyed this film very much, and surprisingly so. Apatow is clearly a gifted writer, though we may only get to see his true talent in the down-times. Rogen and Heigl too, I thought were very good and had a very sweet on-screen chemistry. I can only give 4 stars as the film dipped a little during the latter stages of the pregnancy - but overall, a film I enjoyed immensely.

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On the plane going on holiday, they showed the (now not so) new Indiana Jones movie. A little far-fetched, but an enjoyable way to kill a couple of hours 37000 feet about sea level.

 

On the way back, we had an overnight flight (taking off at 2 am local time, and landing at 5.10 am local time) so had the pleasure of 2 films - "Married in Las Vegas" and "Prince Caspian". I can't confess I took in much of either, though at least they were different enough that I didn't get confused as to what I was watching between naps!

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I watched "It's a Wonderful Life" this weekend, for the first time. I've had warm and enthusiastic reviews from all sorts of friends about what a life-enhancing experience it would be....

 

If I didn't enjoy it that much, does that mean I must be a bad and deeply cynical person????

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For the first time in years (and thanks to Opal and Paula) I watched P'Tang Yang Kipperbang last week. This was the first in Channel Four's "First Love" series more than a quarter of a century ago.

 

The story is set in 1948 and the basic plot concerns a 14-year-old boy called Alan who has a crush on Ann, a girl in his class. What amazes me is that (and I write as someone who has watched this film with 2 wives over the years!), despite being the slushy / sloppy sort of story that is generally reckoned to appeal to females rather than males, somehow it's us men who find the story so interesting. There are 2 obvious reasons for this, I suppose - firstly, the use of cricketing analogies throughout (complete with commentaries by John Arlott), secondly the fact that the story is told from the male teenager's perspective.

 

As I so often do after watching a film from years ago, I found myself wondering what happened to the 2 young stars. John Albasini (Alan) seems to have almost disappeared from the large and small screens, but Abigail Cruttenden (Ann) has had a number of roles including that of Sean Bean's wife in both Sharpe and in real life.

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I had a salutory lesson yesterday in the perils of seeing the film versions of books you've loved.

 

Toby Young's "How to Lose Friends and Alienate People", his memoir of his time working for "Vanity Fair" magazine, is one of the few books ever to make me laugh out loud in public. On that basis, I was keen to see the film version even allowing for some of the changes I was aware of that I'd assumed were for legal reasons e.g. not using the names "Vanity Fair" or Graydon Carter, the publication's Editor-in-Chief, here played by Jeff Bridges under the soubriquet Clayton Harding, a scene stealing turn.

 

However, the book does have a somewhat downbeat ending, with a chastened Young leaving "Vanity Fair" with his tail between his legs, although he did get the girl. Not good enough for Hollywood, where it is required bumbling characters like Simon Pegg's Sidney Young, the fictionalised version of the author, live happily ever after. Thus, after a few false starts, he rises up the ranks and gets the girl, in this case fellow journalist and aspiring novelist Alison Olsen (Kirsten Dunst). All very heartwarming, but it rather makes a mockery of the title.

 

There's none of the insight Young provides in the book into the differences London and New York City or between being a big fish and enfant terrible in the small pond of the UK media and his magazine "The Modern Review" and a tiny cog in the corporate publicity machine of Condé Nast, the publishers of "Vanity Fair".

 

Apart from Bridges, the acting's pretty weak, Gillian Anderson wasting a possibly vampish turn as a PR, for example, and Dunst is as blandly blonde as ever. It is left to Pegg's charisma to hold up the film. He almost carries the day, but the damage is too much for him to repair.

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I watched "It's a Wonderful Life" this weekend, for the first time. I've had warm and enthusiastic reviews from all sorts of friends about what a life-enhancing experience it would be....

 

If I didn't enjoy it that much, does that mean I must be a bad and deeply cynical person????

 

yes

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I watched "It's a Wonderful Life" this weekend, for the first time. I've had warm and enthusiastic reviews from all sorts of friends about what a life-enhancing experience it would be....

 

If I didn't enjoy it that much, does that mean I must be a bad and deeply cynical person????

 

No. I'm a deeply cynical person and I enjoyed it.

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Toby Young's "How to Lose Friends and Alienate People", his memoir of his time working for "Vanity Fair" magazine, is one of the few books ever to make me laugh out loud in public.

 

I saw Toby Young on ITV's Loose Women 2 or 3 weeks ago. He didn't seem anywhere near as repulsive a character as he is supposed to be. Mind you, if I found myself sitting between Colleen Nolan and Carol McGiffin, I'd behave myself as well. He certainly seemed conscious of the differences between his book and the film and I'd say he was a little uncomfortable about them.

 

The film did get a fair old panning from the several reviews that I read.

 

On Grammath's recommendation, though, I shall be adding the book to my TBR pile in the near future.

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On Grammath's recommendation, though, I shall be adding the book to my TBR pile in the near future.

Snap.

 

I watched Iron Man last night, actually, I watched it twice. Already a huge fan of Robert Downey Jnr, since his Weird Science days, this film didn't really have to work very hard to entertain me and entertaining it most certainly is.

 

RDJ plays Tony Stark, the hot-shot, drinking, womanizing CEO of Stark Industries - a weapons manufacturer. On a promotional trip to Afghanistan to sell his new missile launcher, the Jericho, his army cortege is attacked by insurgents and all are left dead bar Tony. He is captured and forced to build the Jericho for his captors. In the attack, shrapnel lodged near his heart and a fellow captive, a doctor, created a huge magnet to be attached to Tony's chest to keep the shrapnel from entering his heart. Instead of making the missile launcher, Tony and the doctor create an iron man suit which enables escape.

 

Back in the USofA, (Tony asks only for a cheeseburger on his return - good American values at work there), Tony announces that Stark Industries will no longer manufacture weapons and will pursue more humanitarian ends. Nobody is terribly happy about that, not least Tony's CEO partner. Nor are the insurgents happy at Tony's escape.

 

This is a hugely enjoyable slice of comic book hero. RDJ is excellent as always, embodying a dark comedy to the what could have been a cheesy-as-hell role. Gywneth Paltrow plays his PA, Pepper Pots, rather woodenly, but Jeff Bridges is a fiercesome parallel to Tony. I loved it.

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I watch the horror movie Mirrors today at the cinema. Was a really good film. Gory in places but it had an incredible storyline. Enough jumps to keep you going aswell. :P

Great film.

A good watch for any horror fan :)

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I watched Iron Man last night

 

Having just finished Volume 8 of Marvel's Essential Spider-Man (yes, I've read 1 to 7), I'm thinking of starting on the Iron Man saga. I remember reading these stories way back in the late '60s, when Marvel launched itself in the UK via a comic called POW!

 

I really ought to find time to watch the Spider-Man 2 and 3 movies which my boys have seen a number of times.

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I'm thinking of starting on the Iron Man saga.
I heartily recommend the film...

 

I really ought to find time to watch...Spider-Man...3
but not that one.

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I went to the flicks today, taking the boys to see Igor. Igor is apprentice to an evil scientist in Malaria. Malaria used to be such a nice place: countryside, farming, sun, then a hideous storm blew in and didn't leave. Malaria was plunged into darkness. To make money, evils scientists are encouraged to create evil weapons/inventions with which to blackmail the world with. All the evil scientists have an 'Igor' to help, but out particular Igor (voiced by John Cusack) has aspirations of being an evil scientist himself. Following the death of his evil scientist, Igor steps up to create an evil weapon, win the evil invention competition and thus be loved and adored by all.

 

This is an awful film. Quite apart from the fact that it is boring as hell, it is also utterly lacking in any charm. It is Burton-by-numbers, Disneyfied and forced. The makers have taken the basics of Burton and royally fouled it up. None of the characters are very engaging, except maybe by one of Igor's creations, Scamper who is voiced by Steve Buscemi. The story is tired and dull and quite frankly the setting has sod all to do with the story - it doesn't enhance it in any way. The animation itself is fine, but the set pieces and landscapes are overcrowded and far too bright and colourful to suit the tale. If you want a scary kids' film - make it scary, keep it simple, keep the colours muted. Better choices to give your kids some Halloween fare would be Monster's House or the classic Nightmare Before Christmas.

 

As for my boys: the 7 year old liked it but forgot the film the minute we left the cinema and hasn't mentioned it since. The 3 year old fell asleep.

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In bed with a cold and unable to concentrate even on The White Tiger, I've watche the recent US remake of the Hong Kong thriller The Eye and it's very, very ho hum. Spells out things that the original lets you work out for yourself. Just one scene where the heroine looks at a photo (if you've seen the original, you'llknow what men, but I won't spoil it for anyone else) and suddenly screams was brilliant in the first - a completely freaky surprise that had the guts torn out of it in the remake. I don't know why the US insists on doing this. I mean, I canunderstand remakes. But if something works, why not work out why it works, and work with it, instead of changing it to some Holywood formula tht we're all completely familiar with and no longer really intereste in?

 

And for something completely different, I also watched Charlie Wlison's War. This is a weird film. Tom Hanks is entirely believable as a womanising congressmen (of his buxom all-female staff, he says 'you can teach them to type but you can't teach them to grow tits') who turns out to have some values after all, and who works with a renegade CIA agent (Philip Seymour Hoffman, who has to be one of the finest character actors around at the moment) and socialite Julia Roberts (stretching herself and almost pulling it off) in providing weaponry to Afghan rebels during the Russian invasion. The film manages the Americans-can-do-anything cliche with so much charm that it's almost inoffensive, assisted by being so politically astute, having such clever dialogue and such fine actors. I'd recommend it.

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Went to see Boy in the Striped Pyjamas on Thursday. While it was quite honest to the book, it seemed to lose a lot of it's impact. The ending was unfortunate - his lordship found part of it amusing, which wasn't really the idea!

 

It was also quite confusing in places - as the actors all had such clipped "English" accents it was easy to forget it was set in Germany / Berlin.

 

An ok film, but I'd recommend the book more!

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After the uber-feminine Sex and the City I've just watched the uber-masculine There Will Be Blood. It's not really fair to compare them, though. In There Will Be Blood Paul Thomas Anderson (Magnolia) directs Daniel Day-Lewis in peak form in a fascinating story about early twentieth century oilfields, everything from the lighting to the soundtrack perfectly brilliant.

 

It's an abolute masterpiece, about so much more than oil - about fathers who aren't fathers, brothers who aren't brothers, even gods that aren't gods. The sort of film that seizes your attention for 2 1/2 hours and doesn't let up, doesn't let you go, exposes something of human life that you feel you didnt quite understand before you saw it. It's stunning, it's ferocious, I'm going to be recommending it to everyone I know.

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Twelve Monkeys.

 

I've not seen it before and it kept me guessing right up till the end, which is always satisfying. The predictable can be very boring :P .

 

I remain mystified about the voice Bruce Willis heard a couple of times in the future, who seemed to be the same as the old tramp with teeth removed who he met in 1996. Was that ever explained? Did I miss something?

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Just watched three quarters of The Edukators at my German class. I had to leave, but I've seen it before and will watch the end before I have to discuss it next week!

Has anyone seen it? 2 idealistic young would-be revolutionaries break into the homes of the wealthy and mess up their homes, without stealing or destroying anything, and leave a message - Your days of plenty are numbered (the title of the film in German). They claim they just want to make the super-rich think about their wealth. Of course, a girl enters their circle and things take a nasty turn, and they end up having to confront their ideals. I really enjoyed seeing it for a second time.

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