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Minxminnie

Twilight (1)

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Hi let me start i have seen the film and was dissapointed one the main scenes was missed out.(Blood typing scene)Also this is the first time i have been to the cinema and would not get up to go to the loo incase i missed something. i loved it that much.

However i did go and see the film first which then prompted me to read the book.

His Lordship and myself went to see the film last night. A fair adaptation, though I too was disappointed at the lack of blood typing.

 

Himself has also asked if he ought to read the books, as he has seen that New Moon is going to happen, and living with a librarian teaches you that you should always read the book first!

 

It was an ok film, my major problem was the casting of Charlie (about 30 pounds too thin) and the amount of cutural diversity in an American town with only 3100 residents in the middle of nowhere!!!

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I've not read any of these but still had a good old chuckle at the material on this page. If you're a committed fan I suggest you don't click...

 

(Is it really that bad?)

 

Brilliant, hilarious!

 

(Yes it is, but it is also brilliant just for being able to appeal to teens as much as it does so I can't slate it entirely!)

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hey, ya i read that but i didn't really finish it for two reasons

1 it seemed like it was for kids

2 it talked about such an awsome love story that gets you all exited and then after youd put the book down and go through your day youd start to relies that thats something that would never realy happen so youd feel all crappy :( in short words it gives false hope that somthing like that might happen to you. does any one agree? pleas reply

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I've been a fan of this serioes since shortly after Twilight first came out. I hope I don't sound like a snob when I say the fangirls are kind of ruining it for me, I have never really been caught up in the Edward obsession. I am a big fan of the series, even though I find Bella really frustrating sometimes. My main complaint is that this books seems to attract only two kinds of people, those who are rabidly in love with it and those who hate it completely. I will admit it's not the best written book, But I still think the story is amazing.

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Apart from Harry Potter, a few shortish historical diary / novels and Jacqueline Wilson, my 15yo daughter has (to my eyes) read very little, despite opportunity and encouragement.

 

Having seen the film Twilight recently she decided to buy the book and has now read the 1st 2 in the series in just a few days, and is well into the 3rd.

 

I love to see her reading, but it's amazing how quickly I have moved from wishing she would read more to wishing she would, just for 5 minutes, take her nose out of the bl***y book! ;)

 

After she has finished this series, what recommendations can I put before her to keep up this sudden enthusiasm for reading? (Any recommendations coming direct from me would be dismissed without hesitation so any thoughts may be cut and paste for her attention...!!)

 

(I guess there maybe specific threads for these recommendations so please feel free to point me in the right diretion, if that's easier.)

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After she has finished this series, what recommendations can I put before her to keep up this sudden enthusiasm for reading?
One suggestion I would make is The Red Necklace (there is a thread for this).

 

I too have come late to this book. A friend lent me a copy of Twilight weeks ago and only this week did I pick it up. Since that moment I have not been able to put it down.

 

I think Hazel sums the book up very well; it's a great read, you connect with the characters, but the writing is not wonderful. Nevertheless, I for one will be looking for the next in the series.

 

Not sure whether I will get the DVD (now out I am told) because I want to hold on to my view of the characters until I read the other three books in the series.

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'The Mediator' series by Meg Cabot

'Vampire Beach' series by Alex Duval

'Blood and Chocolate' by Annette Curtis Clause

'Blood Sinister' by Celia Rees

'Petshop of Horrors' by Matsuri Akino (Manga series).

'Vampire Diaries' series by LJ Smith

 

Then there's plenty other directions from there, like other romances, other horror/supernatural stuff. Meg Cabot has written a stack of very good books that go from teen up to adult, most of them not supernatural! Celia Rees has written lots of other good (i.e. quality) scary stories. Manga would open up another avenue.

 

Good luck!

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I watched the Twilight film last night, much to my hubby's annoyance. I must admit, I expected to enjoy it and I did - no qualms from me. Though Carlisle didn't seem 'old' enough to feasibly be thought of as the Cullens adoptive father - he seemed almost the same age as them. It is beautifully shot, bleached like Catherine Hardwicke's other work, Lords of Dogtown. Most of the characters were played by the right actors, especially Stewart and Pattinson as Bella and Edward. Bella could have been a little more fiesty but I love Stewart's voice and that more than made up for lack of fiestiness.

 

And Pattinson as Edward? Well, when I first saw the promos and posters for the film, I didn't think he was right - he looks too...odd in photos. But actually he was very good, I thought he had Edward down quite well. Very swoonsome. Maybe not as aloof and aged as Edward appears in the books - he doesn't speak as if from another period as much as he does in the book - but still, I was quite...engaged with his portrayal.

 

Admittedly, I did cringe a couple of times, and looked round at hubby in embarassment. Once, when Bella and Edward were climbing up trees. And when they were in the forest declaring undying love "I've waited so long to meet you." Shudder.

 

But all in all - it was a pretty good film. My boys both enjoyed it very much - except when Bella and Edward were kissing...yeuch! And guess what - hubby updated his Facebook status to say that he is slightly worried that he enjoyed Twilight.

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I finished reading this book a couple of month ago. At first I was a little confused as to whether this book was aimed at teenagers or adults. I did consider giving up (although I was enjoying it!) on this basis but decided that since I had paid for it I might as well finish it. And I'm so pleased I did!

 

'Twilight' is a basic love story (I found myself finding comparisons to 'Romeo and Juliet'...don't shout! I think is actually brought up in the text). It is not a new concept: girl loves boy, boy loves girl, both families are against their relationship, etc. The vampire aspect adds a bit of adventure, I thought, and I found it enjoyable having been a fan of the 'Buffy' novels in my teen years. I found myself struggling to put it down at the end of the day, anxious to see what would happen next. It's a nice novel to escape into if you've had a bad day!

 

Interestingly, I have read the second novel in the series and didn't find it as captivating as the first. It took me much longer to get through - I had to stop reading it for a time as I had no interest in it at all. Needless to say, I haven't hurried to read the third, but I will do to see how the series pans out (plus I've already bought it and the fourth novel as they were on special offer at the supermarket!).

 

Helen.

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Interestingly, I have read the second novel in the series and didn't find it as captivating as the first. It took me much longer to get through - I had to stop reading it for a time as I had no interest in it at all

 

Helen....IMHO the second book is by far the weakest in the series. The biggest problem for me was that the character that I found most captivating- Edward, played a very small role and is too absorbed in Bella - who regardless of my love of the books, I find very grating!

Now that you have trudged through New Moon you can get back to the indulgence that is the rest of the Twilight series

 

 

(P.S, I'm not sure if the quoting was done correctly - so if it isn't right, I'm sorry!)

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'Twilight' is a basic love story (I found myself finding comparisons to 'Romeo and Juliet'...don't shout! I think is actually brought up in the text). It is not a new concept: girl loves boy, boy loves girl, both families are against their relationship, etc.

 

I think you're very right there, and where skypumpkin said earlier Edward is the perfect man, it reminded me of how Mr Darcy in Pride & Prejudice is also often cited as a perfect man, but in fact we learn very little of the specifics of what he is like, so everyone can imagine their perfect man and the story works for everyone.

 

Not for me I must add, i was captivated but the whole fancying a girl because you like the smell of her blood thing made me more than anything worried about why do teenage girls find this guy attractive? and what does it say about what girls *think* they want, that they'd go for a guy who is constantly having to overcome an urge to kill you......

 

I couldn't get into New Moon either.

 

Oh and on similar books there is now a glut of books with very similar covers leaping on the Twilight bandwagon...

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I think Edward is fascinating. He's very charismatic and I can see why teenage girls are so attracted to him: I would be too. Yes, the fact that Bella is his own particular brand of heroin and that's why he's so attracted to her is disturbing, but I'm intrigued by their relationship and the fact that he can't get too involved physically is interesting. I also get why he doesn't want to make her a vampire - if he does, it might alter his attraction to her: something might be lost between them. She wants to lose her innocence and he doesn't want her too. I think that's quite nice.

 

Bella's awkwardness is a bit grating, as are the descriptions of her life away from Edward. I kept wanting the real story to get going. I think she's very noble, though.

 

It's true that it's not brilliantly written, but the love story is compelling, probably more complex than a lot of writers manage. Certainly Edward is the best character and if he wasn't there to hold the story together it would be much, much less interesting.

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It's just preaching morals, which are stupid.
Preaching morals is stupid? Or preaching morals that are stupid? And what is stupid about the morals then?

 

And I didn't believe Edward was a vampire for one second. He just seems like a weird human.
He is a vampire though, Meyer tells you that almost immediately - do you mean that you didn't believe in the vampire characterization? What didn't you believe about it? What wasn't authentic for you?

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And I didn't believe Edward was a vampire for one second. He just seems like a weird human.

 

I'm surprised you feel that Edward is unbelievable as a vampire- I think that his complete deviation from all vampire characters before him only strengthens the depth and sincerity of the character by moving away from the sexual, unnatural and self assured behaviour of Twilight's predecessors.

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He just seems like a weird human.

 

Not like any weird humans I've ever met!

Are any vampires "believable"?

I knew this was a vampire story so didn't have any real difficulty accepting Edward as a vampire, he was certainly no ordinary teenage boy. The werewolves were a step too far for me, but that's another thread!

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Preaching morals is stupid? Or preaching morals that are stupid? And what is stupid about the morals then?

 

He is a vampire though, Meyer tells you that almost immediately - do you mean that you didn't believe in the vampire characterization? What didn't you believe about it? What wasn't authentic for you?

 

SPOILER FOR BREAKING DAWN:

 

 

No sex before marriage- so just get married early! Get yourself knocked up while you're at it! Heaven forbid anyone should question you.

 

 

Edward basically behaves like a drug addict, and not in a good way. He just acts like someone out of an emo band, which is probably the point. And it was kind of off-putting the way Meyer is blatantly in love with him.

 

New Moon was okay because it was completely melodramatic and Edward was a bit more standable but it's all ridiculous.

 

We all know he won't bite her- he just munches on deer.

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Golly, what to say about the book that has trillions of teen girls foaming at the mouth? What to say about Mormon Meyer who has written a pretty sexy teen book? Nothing really, other than add my thoughts on this book.

 

I really didn't expect too much from Twilight, but thought I should give it a go considering its huge popularity among teens and the fact that it is about vampires. I love vampire stories - even the fairly bad ones. And I freely confess to romanticizing them - there's nothing sexier than a 'good' vampire: Dracula, Lestat, Spike, Angel...But I just didn't think that Twilight would grab me.

 

Isabella Swan, Bella to everyone, moves from her home in Phoenix with her mother to Forks, to live with her father. She is feisty, different, and strong. At her new school, she finds it easy to make friends and unlike her life in Phoenix where you gather she was a bit of an outsider, she seems to fit right in. Practically from the off, she notices a group of beautiful, mysterious, ethereal kids, and one in particular keeps staring then takes an obvious dislike to her. These are the Cullens - a group of adopted kids belonging to Esme and Carlisle Cullen. No one else in the school seems to fraternise with them.

 

Soon, Edward Cullen - the stare-y one - has to rescue Bella in a car accident. And she notices that he got to her far too quickly to make a resuce possible. Edward, da-da dah!, is a vampire as is his family. And he and Bella fall in love.

 

There more than a few niggles with this book. It's not wonderfully written really - the writing has no depth, and bearing in mind Minxminnie's previous questions about the academic suitability of the book, I'd have to say there's none. There's nothing to uncover, play with language, or sparkling dialogue. It's a pretty straightforward narrative. Nothing special. Meyer ain't no Blume.

 

Also, Bella spends far too much time initially telling us how different she is from other girls, how different from everyone at her old school, how 'special' she is...it's was annoying - we could have grasped a little of that ourselves from the narrative. Then suddenly, she moves to Forks and godammit, if every boy isn't after her! Remarkable.

 

That all said...I couldn't put the blooming thing down. Seriously - I stayed up till 2am on Saturday night reading the damn thing. The Sunday came, and I rushed over to Borders to buy the next 2 in the sequence: New Moon and Eclipse. I started New Moon last night. It's completely inexplicable. Well, not really, I can tell what I liked about the book. Edward is completely arresting as is his family - all very interesting characters. The difficult relationship between Bella and Edward is gripping. And Meyer is a bit novel in her approach. Edward loves Bella - everything about her, and doesn't want her to come to harm. However, he loves her so much that it is very difficult for him not to feast upon her. So bodily contact between them has to be very controlled. A morality lesson for our teens you think? Not so - he kisses her but she isn't allowed to do anything back to him, she can't respond because to do so would get him so aroused that he might just eat her. This is some kind of S&M schtick! They can't have sex either...Edward's strength and speed is such that in the raptures of sex, he might...eat, kill, maim, feast upon her. Good lord, it was frustrating.

 

By the end of the book, I was internally screaming "make Bella a vampire too! Make Bella a vampire!!" Which, of course, is exactly what Bella asks Edward to do. He adamantly refuses - such a gent. But his sister Alice, who has the power to foresee the future has envisioned such a scenario and that's what spurs on the next book.

 

I can't quite believe how gripped I was by this book. I can tell you that if I was a teen again, I would be re-reading it nightly. And dreaming of Edward. Absolute nonsense.

 

I'm with Hazel on this. Finished it a couple of days ago and, even though I'm not a teenage girl, I still loved it.

 

I'm not going to be snobbish and complain about its lack of literary merits: it was enjoyable to read and a good story which is exactly what a book should be!

 

I'd love to be Edward Cullen.

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Golly, what to say about the book that has trillions of teen girls foaming at the mouth? What to say about Mormon Meyer who has written a pretty sexy teen book? Nothing really, other than add my thoughts on this book.

 

I really didn't expect too much from Twilight, but thought I should give it a go considering its huge popularity among teens and the fact that it is about vampires. I love vampire stories - even the fairly bad ones. And I freely confess to romanticizing them - there's nothing sexier than a 'good' vampire: Dracula, Lestat, Spike, Angel...But I just didn't think that Twilight would grab me.

 

Isabella Swan, Bella to everyone, moves from her home in Phoenix with her mother to Forks, to live with her father. She is feisty, different, and strong. At her new school, she finds it easy to make friends and unlike her life in Phoenix where you gather she was a bit of an outsider, she seems to fit right in. Practically from the off, she notices a group of beautiful, mysterious, ethereal kids, and one in particular keeps staring then takes an obvious dislike to her. These are the Cullens - a group of adopted kids belonging to Esme and Carlisle Cullen. No one else in the school seems to fraternise with them.

 

Soon, Edward Cullen - the stare-y one - has to rescue Bella in a car accident. And she notices that he got to her far too quickly to make a resuce possible. Edward, da-da dah!, is a vampire as is his family. And he and Bella fall in love.

 

There more than a few niggles with this book. It's not wonderfully written really - the writing has no depth, and bearing in mind Minxminnie's previous questions about the academic suitability of the book, I'd have to say there's none. There's nothing to uncover, play with language, or sparkling dialogue. It's a pretty straightforward narrative. Nothing special. Meyer ain't no Blume.

 

Also, Bella spends far too much time initially telling us how different she is from other girls, how different from everyone at her old school, how 'special' she is...it's was annoying - we could have grasped a little of that ourselves from the narrative. Then suddenly, she moves to Forks and godammit, if every boy isn't after her! Remarkable.

 

That all said...I couldn't put the blooming thing down. Seriously - I stayed up till 2am on Saturday night reading the damn thing. The Sunday came, and I rushed over to Borders to buy the next 2 in the sequence: New Moon and Eclipse. I started New Moon last night. It's completely inexplicable. Well, not really, I can tell what I liked about the book. Edward is completely arresting as is his family - all very interesting characters. The difficult relationship between Bella and Edward is gripping. And Meyer is a bit novel in her approach. Edward loves Bella - everything about her, and doesn't want her to come to harm. However, he loves her so much that it is very difficult for him not to feast upon her. So bodily contact between them has to be very controlled. A morality lesson for our teens you think? Not so - he kisses her but she isn't allowed to do anything back to him, she can't respond because to do so would get him so aroused that he might just eat her. This is some kind of S&M schtick! They can't have sex either...Edward's strength and speed is such that in the raptures of sex, he might...eat, kill, maim, feast upon her. Good lord, it was frustrating.

 

By the end of the book, I was internally screaming "make Bella a vampire too! Make Bella a vampire!!" Which, of course, is exactly what Bella asks Edward to do. He adamantly refuses - such a gent. But his sister Alice, who has the power to foresee the future has envisioned such a scenario and that's what spurs on the next book.

 

I can't quite believe how gripped I was by this book. I can tell you that if I was a teen again, I would be re-reading it nightly. And dreaming of Edward. Absolute nonsense.

 

Couldn't have said it better Hazel - I read the first one at home as had finished the book I'd brought and my sister had it. I couldn't believe how gripped I was by what I was completely aware was absolute nonsense. My sister hinted that the suspense was to come, but really I didn't care if Bella became a vampire or not! I knew she couldn't die as that would be a rubbish ending and that there were 2 more books. Found Bella very annoying though - too much the teen heroine, absolutely perfect, everyone fancies her - hmm. I felt like I was reading a Sweet Valley High Halloween special.

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Found Bella very annoying though - too much the teen heroine, absolutely perfect, everyone fancies her - hmm. I felt like I was reading a Sweet Valley High Halloween special.

 

I found Bella annoying, but saw her as far from perfect!

 

I hated Bella's doormat tendencies! I know she was supposedly presented as being independent, self-sufficient and even a bit of a loner, but that just didn't fit in at all with her neediness with Edward and later, Jacob.

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I am currently on the third book of the Twilight saga and am totally in love with them. No, I'm not a teenage girl although I was around 20 years ago.

As JdE says, there's no need to discuss the literary merit because nothing will take away the fact that the books are great. The second one perhaps not so good as the others as Edward played a very small part and I found myself just reading it for when he came back into the story.

 

For the first time I have preferred to listen to an audiobook over reading a book. I also think the choice of narrator for the series works very well as you can really imagine her being Bella - she's an American female called Ilyana Kadushin. I don't want to see the films until I have finished the entire saga as I have my own picture of each of them in my head and I don't want that to change.

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My middle/high school girl students adore these books, of course. I finally managed to borrow a copy from a 40-something woman in my office (several of my coworkers, my age, are hooked and were raving on about getting their advance New Moon tickets), thinking "ok, this is going to be a bit silly." I had a hard time putting it down...just a fun read. Everyone needs a little brain candy at times.

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I'm sorry but I have to say I found Twilight the biggest load of crap I have ever had the misfortune to watch or read! (I recently read the book to find out what all the fuss was about and my daughter borrowed the DVD from a friend) I know I am in a minority on this one but but good god its rubbish!!

 

The plot is paper thin the characters are not likable at all the girl is so needy and totally without any backbone whatsoever its pathetic I was also quite shocked as to how simular the basic plot was to the Sookie Stackhouse series of books which I have read, loved and and raved about, so if you want a good vampire story I would go for the Sookie Stackhouse series instead. They are by Charlaine Harris. They have much more umph and a more adult theme running through them (they are downright steamy in places), the characters are more engaging especially the lead female character, she is an interesting gutsy character unlike Bella, and the way they are written you actually end up caring what happens next, I got half way through Twlight and was ready to stake both Edward and Bella myself! The Sookie Stackhouse books are far superior to the insepid crap Ms Meyer has churned out, and oh yes I do believe they were written first! (but don't quote me on that one!)

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I read the first two books, skimmed most of the third book, and could hardly read the fourth book. I read these because my son liked the first and second books and both kids liked the movie.

 

My son liked all the powers of the vampires and werewolves and when it veered ever more into the love story without any fighting, he lost interest. He asked me to read the last two and tell him the interesting parts, but I couldn't really do it. I just told him not to bother reading them.

 

We have now also seen the movie of the second book. And I had the same problem with the movie as I had with the book.

Why would anyone prefer cold, skinny, pasty-pale Edward to hot, hot, hot Jacob? This is a disgusting sentence for me to write, since I'm WAY older than Jacob, but it has to be said. Plus, Edward hurts and abandons Bella in this book--for noble reasons, I know--and Jacob is endlessly loyal and in love with her. This is the same problem I have with Gone with the Wind. Why would Scarlett O'Hara prefer Ashley Wilkes to Rhett Butler? Inexplicable.

 

 

All that being said, I enjoyed the first two books, but not the last two. For all her writing flaws, Stephanie Meyer does seem to have created a world with well-defined characters. By the way, I'm pretty sure that she has a cameo in the first movie. She's the woman sitting at the counter in the diner where Bella and her father eat together. When you see the movie, you think "who is that and why is she so prominent in this scene?" I think that's why.

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      The Host is set in a dystopian American world, which has been taken over by these small creatures which are implanted into the necks of humans. The host body and mind is then controlled by these friendly altruistic creatures, who are trying to rescue our world from our violence and destruction.
      Wanda is implanted into Melanie, but Melanie (unlike most humans) fights back, she battles to gain control of her body and fights to stop the others from seeking out her family and implanting them. As the novel progresses Wanda and Melanie travel to find Melanie's family, with many unexpected outcomes.
       
      The book is cheesey in places, but its 600 pages most of which I read in one day, so it obviously has its good points. The characters battle against what it means to be human and humane. Worth checking out if you liked Meyer's previous books (of which I have 3 more to read).
    • By anneliesscott
      Picked this up at the weekend and read it in half a day - a must for Twilight fans, but don't bother if you haven't read Eclipse!
       
      Because I enjoyed it so much as a Twilight fan, I can't tell if it was actually a good book or not - my feeling about the whole Twilight series is that Meyer's writing improves hugely as we get to book 4, and I loved the Host. I have a feeling this is not her best work, but as I say, still loved it for the links to Eclipse and extra insights it gave.
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