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I've been thinking about books which made a deep impression on me as a child. Narnia is still a real place in my mind. I also loved The Borrowers. Perhaps the fact that I always lived in creaky old houses with secret spaces made the worlds in these books seem so possible.

 

What do other bookgrouponliners remember reading as kids?

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The books that really made a deep impression when I was a kid were the ones that my mum loved as a little girl, and then read out loud to me, as soon as I was old enough to appreciate them.

 

"Little Women" and "What Katie Did", and their sequels.

And a few Noel Stretfield ones - "Wintle's Wonders" and "Party Frock" and "Ballet Shoes"

 

Definitely Narnia, although I read those for myself, because my mum wasn't really into fantasy, and my dad did annoying "voices" for the characters when he read it to me - and I got really cross!!

 

And plenty of Enid Blyton - the Famous Five, and the Twins at St Clares. (But never the Secret Seven or Mallory towers, for some reason :confused: It was like Sindy and Barbie when I was growing up - you had to be loyal to one or the other - you couldn't possibly like both! ;) )

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I must admit, Narnia was a big deal for me as a kid. It set my imagination racing and I spent probably an abnormal amount of time looking for secret passages behind furniture.

 

I also loved Alan Garner - The Weirdstone of Brisingamen, probably anything with a fantasy twist. Heavily interspersed with Asterix and Tintin! Now I think about it, Penelope Lively - The Driftway, Tom's Midnight Garden.... I must resist just writing a long list here!

 

I think as a child you really LOVE books in a way that perhaps you lose as you get older... well, love them in a different way at least.

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Oh yes - I read and loved Alan Garner as well. I'm scared to re-read them in case they aren't as magical as I remember. Did you also read Susan Cooper - she had a similar effect on me. Silver on the Tree was the first of the series she wrote I think.

 

In fact now I think about it - the one lead to the other for me! I was a Brownie when I was about 9 - and took my Reader badge - and the badge tester saw all the Susan Cooper and other fantasy on the list of what I'd read in the last few weeks, and scribbled Alan Garner on the bottom of the list before giving it back to me!

 

Thank You - Brownie Badge Tester, whoever you were :)

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I adored Susan Cooper! So much so that my Dad, a committed book lover, threatened to burn them if I read them again one more time!

 

In recent years I had somehow forgotten what they were called and the author's name so I am very grateful to you for reminding me! I can now re-read them in secret hopefully without my dad finding out!

 

Hooray!

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Another Narnia addict here, although the allegorical nature of Dawn Treader and the Last Battle was a bit nauseating for me even at ten.

 

Other great loves, Elidor, Tom's Midnight Garden, most Rosemary Sutcliffe, all of the Swallows & Amazons, Molly Hunter, Andre Norton and some of Heinlein's YA books. I still have most of the books I had as a child, albeit sadly battered, but that's because they've been well read.

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Have to agree with the Narnia books and the Borrowers! Those books probably set me on the course to becoming a fantasy / sc-fi fanatic.

 

Then there were those books abot Happenings (see another thread) - I wish I knew what they were!

 

I also read a few lowbrow children's classics (oxymoron?) such as Billy Bunter and Just William. And I loved the Jennings books by Anthony Burridge.

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My Friend Jack - I loved 'Jennings' as well - they made me laugh out loud. I think the author was Anthony Buckeridge, who sadly died recently at a grand old age.

 

Also enjoyed Noel Streatfield's stories (Ballet Shoes, White Boots etc.)

 

Not much of a famous five fan though, Enid Blyton wasn't my cup of tea.

 

One of my favourite books was 'The Family from One End Street' by Eve Garnett.

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Thanks for reminding me! I'd forgotten all about The Family from One End Street. Did you read The Wind on the Moon by Eric Linklater?

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The Wind in the Willows (by Kenneth Graham, I think). Somehow the tv program Tales of the River Bank gets mixed with the memory of the book. And Johnny Morris' narration.

 

But I can still quote lots of Pooh, is that sad?

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I too was a huge Narnia fan, and although I still have them I have resisted reading them since, due to the massive amount of religious allegorys in them. Isn't it amazing what you see when you're older. I just used to think that they were a darn good magical read. Still it didn't switch me onto religion.

 

Others were Blyton's St Claire's and Mallory Towers, Magic Faraway Tree and Famous Five but not Secret Seven for some reason.

 

Richard Scary's picture books were my favourites when I was tiny tiny.

 

I was also passed down via a cousin (long route) all my mum's Lorna Hill ballet books, A Dream of Sadlers Wells, Veronica at the Wells etc.

 

I loved the Secret Garden and The Little Princess, Wind in the Willows and Winnie the Pooh, also Judy Bloom and Betsy Byers. I had some real favourite compilations of fairy stories that I got out again and again and again from the library like 'witches, wizards and warlocks', 'Princes and Princesses' The cartoon stories I liked were Asterix, Tintin and Lucky Luke.

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Mixed feelings about the Christian allegorical bits in Narnia - given that I'm a Christian, I do find them genuinely moving and helpful on that level. (I would shamelessly and unrepentantly use them as a sermon illustration, if the opportunity arose, I'm afraid :D )

 

But it's a massive shame if it spoils such great books, and makes people not want to reread them :mad: Because they are fantastic books in their own right, without all that.

 

Oddly, I'm aware of Christian parallels in The Lion, The Witch and The Wardrobe, and in The Last Battle and in the Magicians Nephew - but I can't think of much at all in the Dawn Treader, nor any of the others :confused: It always makes me cry when Reepicheep sails off in his coracle, though, but that's not a religious thing, just me being soppy :rolleyes:

 

=============

 

Does anyone remember an Enid Blyton series about some kids solving mysteries, (sounds familiar so far, yes??) - one was called Fatty, and there was a boy called Sid who ate loads of toffee and said garn a lot - and his uncle who was a policeman. Can't remember anything more about them, though, and it's bugging me. Anyone know what they were called?

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Does anyone remember an Enid Blyton series about some kids solving mysteries, (sounds familiar so far, yes??) - one was called Fatty, and there was a boy called Sid who ate loads of toffee and said garn a lot - and his uncle who was a policeman. Can't remember anything more about them, though, and it's bugging me. Anyone know what they were called?

 

 

I think those were the 'Mystery' series that she wrote about the 'five finder-outers' ooh catchy group name! They were Fatty, Larry, Daisy, Pip and Bets and I'm sure there was a dog too.

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That's the one, well done!

 

The Five Finder Outers - classic name, as you say :rolleyes: And there always seemed to be a circus just come to the town...

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Oddly, I'm aware of Christian parallels in The Lion, The Witch and The Wardrobe, and in The Last Battle and in the Magicians Nephew - but I can't think of much at all in the Dawn Treader,

 

It's the bit right at the end of Dawn Treader, when Aslan turns into a lamb.

 

I also had a whole load of Lorna Hill's ballet books - very dated now. I also really liked my mum's Violet Needham books. Anyone ever read The Black Riders? (or even heard of it?)

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Ooh yes - Anne of Green Gables was wonderful. Anne and Gilbert was probably the earliest romance story that really caught me up in it. (That and Jo and her professor from Little Women, I guess)

 

It's the bit right at the end of Dawn Treader, when Aslan turns into a lamb.

 

Bizarre, but I don't remember that bit, even now you mention it :confused: Must have passed me by completely - oh well.

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I think those were the 'Mystery' series that she wrote about the 'five finder-outers' ooh catchy group name! They were Fatty, Larry, Daisy, Pip and Bets and I'm sure there was a dog too.

 

I LIKED the Famous Five! :(

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I liked the Famous Five too.... :) We're not taking the micky out of them, I promise, though I can kind of see how it might read that way, if you hadn't come across the Mystery books.

 

The Five Finder Outers were a genuine different series - (which I also enjoyed) - but with striking parallels to the Famous Five. They were a bit lighter and a bit more comic, I seem to remember, the peril never seemed quite so serious.

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I LIKED the Famous Five! :(

Sorry Harriet I am definately not maligning the Famous Five. I loved those stories even if they aren't considered PC now. I grew up reading all of Enid Blyton's books and still have an awful lot of them sitting on my bookshelves.

 

The Five Finder Outers were a genuine different series - (which I also enjoyed) - but with striking parallels to the Famous Five. They were a bit lighter and a bit more comic, I seem to remember, the peril never seemed quite so serious.

They laughed in the face of danger armed with lashings of ginger beer!

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I think I only ever read one of the Narnia series.

 

I too read Jennings, Billy Bunter, Famous Five, Secret Seven, Arthur Ransome, Just William, and here's a couple not previously mentioned; Malcolm Saville, the Lone Pine Adventures (or was it Lone Pine 5?) including the only one I can remember, "Saucers Over The Moor", and (very early reading) Noddy and Big Ears and Moomin books. (Moomin Mama is one I seem to recall).

 

I ought to have done some research first as some of this sounds a bit vague, but it's all from memory!

 

Definitely my favourite books were the Arthur Ransome ones though.

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