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Hilary

Jane Eyre

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Hi all,

 

I found it interesting in the closing pages of Jane Eyre, that Rochester gradually regains some of his sight. Although the married life that they led together is only very briefly described, it does seem to have been a life lived on a rather more equitable basis than the norms of the times might dictate. To revert momentarily to a psychoanalytic position, one might regard the restoration of his sight, albeit partial, as a regaining of his masculine potential, or potency if you will, but rather more on Jane's terms than wholly on Rochester's, the man's. For the ordinary Victorian reader I suspect this would have been cause for considerable thought.

 

In common with others here, I certainly feel that the change in Jane's finances, although the reader had been forewarned about it, changes her relationships with the men in her life. Her economic empowerment seems to go hand-in-hand with her sexual empowerment and her emancipation from the dominance of male power-relations. Compare Jane Austen's female characters' relations to male power; they need marriage to achieve emancipation, on patriararchal terms, not so Jane Eyre!

 

Sam.

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I've recently listened to an abridged audiobook read by Juliet Stephenson. It was only 3 CDs long and, although well read, was a travesty. :rant:

I must read the full novel now. :yup:

 

I've just started this on unabridged audiobook (16 CDs), also read by Juliet Stevenson. On the evidence of the first half disc, it does seem a fine marriage of novel and reader.

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Well I feel a bit thick because I never picked up on the symbolism apart from obvious things such as the tree being struck by lightening. In the conclusion I was just thinking "finally they're together."

 

Did anyone find all the Jane playing hard to get annoying in a way? I'm surprised Rochester didn't just say forget it, yet again she realised that that's the sort of thing he liked and would keep him interested. I'm surprised Jane didn't point out to Rochester that he wasn't being fair to Adele, he often refered to her as a "brat" and moaned about taking her in and Jane said nothing. He was the one who decided to take her in so there's no point keep moaning about it! I also think Jane should have told St John where to go :confused: he was being a bit ridiculous.

 

I found the ending really typical, it's always the same with classical books many many obsticals all suddenly out of the way: the man turns out not to have been engaged already, he broke off the engagement or in this case the wife's now dead and they can marry. :rolleyes: Also the theme of finding out your related to strangers who've taken you in.

 

I did enjoy it though, took a while to read because I've been revising for my exams and read in breaks of revision.

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This is one of my favourite books. I had to read it for a course and started reluctantly but my word I was instantly hooked. What a deceptively captivating and exciting book! The title seems so dull in comparison to the content.

Powerful and very very romantic. Spooky too I thought.

 

I was very slightly annoyed with Jane for always coming across so morally upright etc.

 

Loved Bertha!

 

Loved the voices echoing to each other etc etc.

 

A rare book in that it's one I will probably re read and many times too.

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I'm surprised Jane didn't point out to Rochester that he wasn't being fair to Adele, he often refered to her as a "brat" and moaned about taking her in and Jane said nothing. He was the one who decided to take her in so there's no point keep moaning about it!
Have you ever listening to a conversation between parents. Most of us nowadays decided to have children and yet we moan about them. Because life is hard and we have to let of steam from time to time. I thought it was quite normal that he moaned. Especially since he wasn't used to having a child around.

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Especially since he wasn't used to having a child around.

On top of which, he was twice Jane's age, and in those days young women didn't 'answer back', or offer unasked for opinions on their elders behaviour.

 

Then there is the fact that he was her employer - and perhaps she wanted to keep her job., not be sacked for impertinence.

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Odd that we still love Jane - she's so straight and morally upright and CB never sees her with any irony. The dialogue is awfully wooden, too, for modern readers. As fo St John he's just a walkin' talkin' livin' doll.

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Brilliant Novel!! I read this back in the 80's at School and did it for my GCE O Level English Lit, thankfully it came up in the exam and i got a B grade..

I have also read it again recently following the TV adaptation last year, its just one of those stories that won't ever lose its class i think.

 

My eldest daughter has read it and loved it so it think that is proof enough :D

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One of my absolutely favourite novels by anyone in any period.

 

Re the apostrophisation of 'Its', as debated in the first few posts: It's is short for it is or it has; its means 'belonging to it'. Therefore, in the opening post, its is correct, and yes, strictly speaking it should be its, not it (and all the its's in this sentence should have quotes round them, but that would have confused the issue, so I left them out).

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This morning the subject of In Our Time, Melvyn Bragg's "history of ideas" discussion programme on Radio 4 was Jane Eyre.

It was a most interesting discussion, and would be well worth 45minutes of any reader's time to listen to it while it is still available on iPlayer, or when it is added to their list of  indefinitely available podcasts

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This morning the subject of In Our Time, Melvyn Bragg's "history of ideas" discussion programme on Radio 4 was Jane Eyre.

It was a most interesting discussion, and would be well worth 45minutes of any reader's time to listen to it while it is still available on iPlayer, or when it is added to their list of  indefinitely available podcasts

 

Yes, I listened to it this morning and it's certainly worth catching up on for those who've missed it.

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