Jump to content
Sideshow Meg

what is everyone doing?

Recommended Posts

About to go to an amazing second-hand bookshop to look for the elusive book 5 of the Asimov "Foundation" series.

 

One hour later ... no luck :(

Edited by Ting Mikyunyu

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Last night I carved a pumpkin, lit tealights inside and sat it on the windowsill of my front room.  Despite having a box chocolates ready, I got no trick-or-treaters at all :(

 

On my way home from work I passed a herd of about 30 children dressed up and being shepherded by various adults (in high-vis jackets) around a different part of the village.  I guess all the local children had been rounded up into some kind of "official" activity (seems to go slightly against the grain for Samhain, but maybe that's just me) so there were none left by the time I was ready for them.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

We had very few children last night apart from a bunch of teenagers who had arrived from another area about 2 miles away - had never seen any of them before.  It was rainy and windy and not at all pleasant so maybe people with younger children just stayed home.  Consequently we have a lot of little chocolate bars which need to be removed from our house so that they don't end up being gobbled up by us.  

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

No-one here either, although I heard some go past. the neighbours grandchildren caught me on the hop a couple of times in the past, but they didn't come this year, or last, leaving me with goodies I could do very well without.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Ours was not well attended, either.  I had a lot of extra candy, which I put in the breakroom at my office, so as to avoid having it constantly available at home. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Our daughter took the leftover goodies down to work and the young part-timers will have it eaten in short order.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The children round here seemed to be carefully shepherded to 'welcoming' houses.  Didn't stop us going to the pub to get out of the way though - it's our tradition!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

We took the batteries out of the doorbell and were unavailable as usual. No Halloween treats for us and, for the second year in a row, no guisers. Makes us sound miserable, doesn't it? Let's just say that opening our door on All Hallows' Eve doesn't guarantee a neighbour's child and something fun so we don't do it.

Edited by lunababymoonchild

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

We took the batteries out of the doorbell and were unavailable as usual. No Halloween treats for us and, for the second year in a row, no guisers. Makes us sound miserable, doesn't it? Let's just say that opening our door on All Hallows' Eve doesn't guarantee a neighbour's child and something fun so we don't do it.

 

Have you had problems in the past with people coming to the door who are threatening?  I don't think I'd want to open the door if there was someone who could cause problems.  

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Have you had problems in the past with people coming to the door who are threatening?  I don't think I'd want to open the door if there was someone who could cause problems.

 

Yes we have. The area in which we live is a good area but - because of the way the boundaries lie - across the street is a very deprived area and we sometimes experience anti-social behaviour. As a result of which we don't answer the door on Hallowe'en. Soon we'll be dodging fireworks.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Yes we have. The area in which we live is a good area but - because of the way the boundaries lie - across the street is a very deprived area and we sometimes experience anti-social behaviour. As a result of which we don't answer the door on Hallowe'en. Soon we'll be dodging fireworks.

 

 

That must make you feel a bit nervous - not pleasant.  :(

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

That must make you feel a bit nervous - not pleasant.   :(

 

 

We got past nervous years ago and we are lucky in that my brother's van (work) sits in the driveway and remains undamaged so it's not Fort Apache but precautions do need to be made.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Packing up, ready to go home. Holiday over. :( Have "A Study in Scarlet" to keep me company on the 14 hour flight.

 

Ting, you must be feeling sad but you've had a good long holiday with your sister, lots of great times and good memories.  And maybe some books to add to your collection?  Best wishes for your journey.  :)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Safe journey,  Ting.

 

I've been out in the gaden, doing a bit of tidying. I was going to pull up the garden canes and get them  under cover, but eneded up leaving them as I picked another handful of beans - and there are still some tiny ones that might develop further if this fine weather continues.

I pulled up the dead courgette plants instead, and cut back some clematis that had blown down in last week's storm.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

We had our first serious frost this morning.  The lawns were a pale green and the car windscreens were frozen over.  Came as quite a shock.  Wonderful bright sunshine but very cold - 3c the highest temperature today.  After the October warmth it was dramatic to say the least.

 

If only we had the sunshine over the weekend when we had a family get-together - a very wet Friday in Manchester and a showery Saturday in Blackburn.  Decided not to go to the firework display in the park as it was teeming down by then and very windy so we had a few fireworks in the back garden for the grandaughters (3 and 1).  It reminded me of all the years we did that for our sons.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Fireworks are going off everywhere, as is usual on the fifth.  It's bitterly cold so not as noisy as is usual and I'm really appreciating the fairly new law we have here in Scotland of not selling fireworks until 2 weeks beforehand.  This means we don't get fireworks for three months.  One year, it started at the beginning of September and stopped just before Christmas.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Fortunately we don't celebrate Guy Fawkes day here - but they have fireworks for many other occasions and it drives a couple of dogs crazy.  So peaceful night for us tonight.  

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Holiday over. :(

 

 

Laughter is the shortest distance between two people.      Victor Borge 1909 - 2000

 

It can't be easy for either of you, returning to normality, but I hope you have had many memorable times in the last few weeks and will be able to smile and laugh across the miles.

 

 

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

 

It can't be easy for either of you, returning to normality, but I hope you have had many memorable times in the last few weeks and will be able to smile and laugh across the miles.

 

Thank you Angel, we have certainly had good fun, a great many laughs (often involving outrageously ridiculous Tom Swifty sentences) and have many happy memories. 

 

The last time Ting  came to Canberra the hills and parts of the city were bare and black after the firestorm of 2003, but a competition had been announced to design a 250 hectare National Arboretum to be planted and replace part of the burned forest.  We went together and looked at about 10 final designs and for fun picked which we liked best.  Eventually in fact the design we liked was the one actually chosen, called 100 Trees 100 Forests, each forest formed by planting 100 each of various threatened or scarce species that could grow in our particular climate.   Despite the drought it was gradually planted up and officially opened this year which is Canberra's Centenary.  It was a very special day when Ting and I went  over it together, as although most of the trees are still very small you can imagine how it will be in about 20 years  or more.    Here are some views as it is too hard to describe adequately.

 

 I know Ting  will be back on BGO as soon as she can and depending on her unreliable internet. It is hard to imagine being pleased to get just an unbroken hour of connection.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Absolutely marvellous pictures Grasshopper, what an accomplishment!  It will be wonderful to see the young trees grow and mature - and all the different exhibits are great.  You could spend a lot of time there to marvel at the scope of what has been done.  Thanks for posting the photos.  

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Wonderful collection of photographs Grasshopper - thanks for that.  How good to see people getting on with life and replanting such a terrific place for the future.  Lifts the heart to see it.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Last night, my mother and I went to hear Wally Lamb read from his new book, "We are Water."  The reading was great and I can't wait to read the book.  Lamb seems to be a kind, gentle soul.  He says that he never does an outline or really even knows where he's going with his books--the characters just start talking.  As a result, he never has a schedule for his books that he can really promise because he has to wait for the characters.  This book, though, came in early because everyone wanted to talk.  He acknowledges that it sounds crazy, but that's just how inspiration hits him.  He also says he can't force the process at all.  When he does, he's not happy with the results.  His publisher must have the patience of Job.  This current book has 8 different "speakers."  One tidbit from the talk: the first character to speak in the book is named "Wally Lamb" in Italian.  

 

But we got something extra, too.  The book deals (fictionally) with a flood that ripped through Lamb's hometown in the early 1960s. One casualty of the flood was a young mother, Honey Moody, who managed to hand her 3 young sons (4, 2, and an infant) to safety before being swept away to her death.  The oldest son, with Lamb's help, has researched and written a book on the flood.  He now lives in Texas and he came to do a reading from his book.  The book is good, very descriptive, and he read from the part describing the moment of loss.  It was very touching because even as he read, it was clear that he was still affected by the loss.  Lamb said that at one point this man, his two brothers, and the then-teenaged boy who helped his father met and walked from the location of the dam that burst down the street and found the tree where they ultimately found refuge.  

 

That book is called A Swift and Deadly Maelstrom by Thomas Moody, Jr.  I plan to read it, too.   I just have to decide which one I should read first.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Loading...

×
×
  • Create New...