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Sideshow Meg

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I'm not sure it's got anything to do with Dolby as such, more the volume control.  Dolby just removes hiss, IIRC.

 

You are correct MFJ. It is the volume that concerns me. Very painful at times. It rather spoiled "Les Miserables" for me.

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Oddly we are the only people I know who have/had a pulley.

We have on in our utility room luna.  Could not cope with laundry-life without it.  It's situated over the boiler so it dries almost everything hung there overnight - if not sooner.  When we moved in it was an older wooden one.  We managed to replace it a few years ago with a modern plastic covered metal one (measurements to pullies on the ceiling matched).

 

Just back from a week's dancing holiday.  Stayed in a hotel just south of Worksop.  Torrential rain most of the week, but managed to visit two National Trust properties, Mr. Straw's House and The Workhouse, both of which were fascinating.  Met some lovely like-minded people and did lots and lots of dancing.  Home for a rest before our visitors next week!

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We have on in our utility room luna.  Could not cope with laundry-life without it.  It's situated over the boiler so it dries almost everything hung there overnight - if not sooner.  When we moved in it was an older wooden one.  We managed to replace it a few years ago with a modern plastic covered metal one (measurements to pullies on the ceiling matched).

 

Just back from a week's dancing holiday.  Stayed in a hotel just south of Worksop.  Torrential rain most of the week, but managed to visit two National Trust properties, Mr. Straw's House and The Workhouse, both of which were fascinating.  Met some lovely like-minded people and did lots and lots of dancing.  Home for a rest before our visitors next week!

Your dancing holiday sounds lovely. :)

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We have on in our utility room luna.  Could not cope with laundry-life without it.  It's situated over the boiler so it dries almost everything hung there overnight - if not sooner.  When we moved in it was an older wooden one.  We managed to replace it a few years ago with a modern plastic covered metal one (measurements to pullies on the ceiling matched).

 

 

Impressive.  We need to replace what the website called laths - one of them is very bent out of shape - and we need some pulley rope.  Toying with the idea of just replacing the whole thing but it would be with a newer version of what we have.  Sorely missing it at the moment and it can't go back up until our ceiling has the second coat and ................

 

I was a the Hobbycrafts/Crafts for Christmas exhibitions today.  Such fun and such a lot to look at.

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I managed to sort out whatever was stopping me download books from Project Gutenberg, thanks to a series of step-by-step emails from my DiL who, luckily, has one of the Kobo range of e-readers. I now have four strangely random C19 books in my library, plus Frankenstein, which is what I was after in the first place, and Orlando.

I am slowly working my way through Frankenstein, usually on buses or in waiting rooms, but with the mini being precisely that, and with me liking a large font I don't get much book to the page :D  My eyes are being a bit of a bother atm, so I don't read for long.

 

I haven't tried to download any more books since, and haven't really explored the various things I could do with the Kobo, other than turn the pages.

I know there are other things, because sometimes unexpected things happen when I swipe the wrong bit of the screen, but I will explore them at some future time, when I'm not actually trying to read something. I quite like the actual e-reading experience so far and once I've got the hang of operating the thing might get a bigger one

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I managed to sort out whatever was stopping me download books from Project Gutenberg, thanks to a series of step-by-step emails from my DiL who, luckily, has one of the Kobo range of e-readers. I now have four strangely random C19 books in my library, plus Frankenstein, which is what I was after in the first place, and Orlando.

I am slowly working my way through Frankenstein, usually on buses or in waiting rooms, but with the mini being precisely that, and with me liking a large font I don't get much book to the page :D  My eyes are being a bit of a bother atm, so I don't read for long.

 

I haven't tried to download any more books since, and haven't really explored the various things I could do with the Kobo, other than turn the pages.

I know there are other things, because sometimes unexpected things happen when I swipe the wrong bit of the screen, but I will explore them at some future time, when I'm not actually trying to read something. I quite like the actual e-reading experience so far and once I've got the hang of operating the thing might get a bigger one

So would you recommend Kobo?

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I would probably recommend it as an inexpensive 'first buy' for someone who is doubtful about the whole e-reader thing, but wants to give it a try without spending too much money - which is why I bought mine.

I couldn't recommend it as the best one to start with as it's the only one I've tried.

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In the last couple of weeks, I have:

 

Taken off from work (something I never do) to attend the State Fair of Texas with a good friend, a visitor from Uganda (Solomon) and a woman from Rwanda (Clemence)  who now lives in the U.S.  Solomon and Clemence didn't know each other before the Fair.  They went along with everything enthusiastically, even some things that I think would appear odd (Big Tex) or oddly out of place (ostrich races).  Here is the link to Big Tex's Wikipedia entry.  You'll notice that he burst into flames and burned about a year ago, which was deeply upsetting to all Texans and which I personally considered a sign of the apocalypse. I had intended to go from 3 until 6 and got home at 11 instead.  I had a great time.  http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Big_Tex#cite_note-13

 

The very next night I attended, with my mother and husband and just about everyone else I knew in Dallas, the Aurora Illuminations in the Arts District of Dallas.  There were 90 works of art that all involved light of some kind.  Some were better than others, but there were several that were jaw-dropping plus I saw a friend of mine who apparently works in this medium and I didn't know it.  We had a lot of fun.

 

The very next night, my son and his special friend (not quite a girlfriend, but more than just a friend friend) went out to dinner and to the Homecoming Dance at his school.  They looked very nice and we went out with the parents to a different restaurant.  We had to spend the day getting ready, including driving the route with my son several times since he was driving from the girl's house to dinner, dinner to the dance, and then back home to the girl's house.  Nothing was really far, but he felt better having done it a couple of times.

 

Tonight is the homecoming football game.   In Texas, this is celebrated by the boy giving the girl a large mum and the girl giving the boy a slightly smaller one.  "Mum" sounds like just a flower and probably originated that way, but of course they have become enormous and festooned.  The one we bought through my son's school for his date is enormous--he thinks it's taller than she is.  The one she gave him last year was pretty good-sized, too, but not that big.  Neither my husband nor I nor his date's parents are from Texas and so we find this custom to be odd, but enjoyable.  This is a link to one on-line article, which just touches the surface of Mum weirdness.  My secretary (a native Texan) said that it wasn't unusual for the girl to need a counterweight down her back to hold the mum on her front.  Good grief.    http://yestotexas.com/12-things-non-texans-need-to-know-about-homecoming-mums/  (the article says mums can cost between $60-$300.  I don't think we even paid $60, so now I feel better about buying something so silly).

 

While he's at the game, I'm going to be catching up on my TV-watching, including watching the first episode of Dracula, which I think means I will see it as the same time as everyone else.

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I In Texas, this is celebrated by the boy giving the girl a large mum and the girl giving the boy a slightly smaller one.  "Mum" sounds like just a flower and probably originated that way, but of course they have become enormous and festooned.  The one we bought through my son's school for his date is enormous--he thinks it's taller than she is.  The one she gave him last year was pretty good-sized, too, but not that big.  Neither my husband nor I nor his date's parents are from Texas and so we find this custom to be odd, but enjoyable.  This is a link to one on-line article, which just touches the surface of Mum weirdness.  My secretary (a native Texan) said that it wasn't unusual for the girl to need a counterweight down her back to hold the mum on her front.

:yikes::lmao: :lmao: :lmao::yikes:

 

Over here a girl's "Mum" is her mother - I can't imagine any girl would want her mum hanging on her at a dance - and neither would her date.

I suppose the advantage of these enormous embellishments is that the girl wouldn't need to buy a posh frock, as it can't be seen!

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So, what do you call chrysanthemums?  They are commonly called "mums" here, but I can see the confusion over there.  Plus, how awful to tell a girl, "Your mum is perfectly enormous!"

 

They are worn to a football game, so no one dresses up.  That's why his dance (which includes dressing up) is the weekend before.  

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I guess everything is bigger and better in Texas as they say!  Sounds like lots of fun Binker.    :D

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So, what do you call chrysanthemums?  They are commonly called "mums" here, but I can see the confusion over there.  Plus, how awful to tell a girl, "Your mum is perfectly enormous!"

 

They are worn to a football game, so no one dresses up.  That's why his dance (which includes dressing up) is the weekend before.

 

We call our Chrysanthemums mums so we would know what you were talking about, here in Scotland, when you said they were pinned on Binker. It sounds like lots of fun. Did you make your own?

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No, I didn't make it. I'm not very crafty and the school sells them as a fund-raiser (I think crafty moms make them). The mums he and his friend exchange are not as big as the ones in the article, although still big to my eyes. The public school kids are the ones with the huge mums and they often do make the mums themselves, which means they are a lot more personalied. When I first read an article about them in the paper, it was like reading about foreign customs. I asked someone if people really did this. Now I think it's a great custom, but am relieved that I don't have to make one.

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I'm winding up my wind-up torch and lamp "just in case".

It's been pretty blustery today, and the forecast for overnight is for much worse, with the possibility of uprooted trees, damage to property and possible power-cuts (hence the winding up of torches). I spent this morning trying to tidy away all the odds and ends lying around the patio and garden, and weighing things down that might go flying across the village - not that anything I've done will help if it's as bad as the gloom-merchants are predicting, but it'll hold out against a fairly strong blow.

Ever since being caught out by the Great Storm of '87 the forecasters have gone OTT with the Severe Weather Warnings, so I'm hoping it won't be that bad, or will have blown itself out a bit by the time it reaches us.

Not much fun for those in the West Country, 'though.

 

I remember lying in bed in '87, feeling the house rock, and hoping the chimneys don't fall through the roof. I'll still be worrying about them this time.

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Stay warm and batten down the hatches Meg - hope the predictions are not as bad as they sound.  I like the sound of the wind but not when it gets to the howling stage.  Stay safe.  

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So, what do you call chrysanthemums?  They are commonly called "mums" here, but I can see the confusion over there.  Plus, how awful to tell a girl, "Your mum is perfectly enormous!"

 

They are worn to a football game, so no one dresses up.  That's why his dance (which includes dressing up) is the weekend before.  

 

We always called them 'Mums" when I worked at my very first school holiday job in a flower nursery near Bath. I had to work  in the "Mum Houses"- glasshouses where they grew the chrysanthemums for florists. They had to have long straight stems and only one large perfect flower, so we spent all day disbudding all the tiny side shoots on the stems by hand, it waxs pretty back breaking and never ending.   I think I earned about 15/- a week, starting at 6.00 am and ending at 5.00pm with 30 minutes for sandwich lunch. But it was wonderful - a job, my own earnings - so adult all of a sudden. :)

 

I love the idea of your dress up mums, Binker, what a lovely souvenir to keep for ever for the girls and what fun to make, although the huge ones are a bit OTT. 

 

To everyone in the UK storm area which looks enormous, good luck and do let us know how you get on and hope you all keep safe. We have many friends and family there too.

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The night was quiet, but the winds reached us at about 6am, and peaking at about 8am. We lost power at 7.30 am, and it came back on half an hour ago. The 'storm' had calmed down considerably by 10am, although it is still a bit wild & windy.

This is the third time in just a couple of months that we've had a power cut - and I still haven't bought batteries for my radio/CD player. :dunce:  I can keep warm, and feed us for a day or so without electricity, but I can't manage without the radio or an audiobook :banghead: .

Mr meg says there are trees down all over the village, causing traffic chaos, and of course the shops weren't open because the cash registers don't work. The surgery couldn't take appointments, either (and I presume the doctors couldn't access patient files for those who had appointments). Technology, eh?

We had one shrub, a viburnum opulus, uprooted and lying across the veg patch. It has been dead for several years, but had its uses as a supply of pea sticks so we hadn't taken it down. Cutting that up kept me warm this morning, and Mr meg is having a turn this afternoon.

I'm glad we didn't have to worry about the big flowering cherry we had felled last autumn.

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Your weather made the news report here, so it must've been quite a storm.  I'm glad you are all doing well.  

 

We used to lose power every time it rained, so much so that I went a bought alarm clocks that reset themselves with a battery when they lost power.  Eventually, the power company figured out where the problem was and fixed it, but it was very tiresome.  

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There was a picture on Google yesterday of a train which runs right along the sea front and waves splashing over. Probably from another time but it must have given the passengers a jolt.

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Apparently there were over 200 trees down across railway lines yesterday morning, which was why most of the train operators did not start services until after 9am.  I chose a different route to work, avoiding roads I knew could flood, fortunately with it being half term the traffic was a lot lighter.

 

Our office building, which was originally the stables for the pub over the road when it was an inn and post office, suffered a bit with the rain.  There was rain water running down the wall next to me in the morning.  The inside wall, over the wallpaper!

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Hope all came through the big storm without too much harm done to property etc.  That would be weird having rain running down the wall MarkC - hope it's dried out now. Sounds like your office is located in a bit of history, stables into offices!  Interesting.  

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I went to Brighton for the weekend and the sea was fantastic on Sunday.  Trying to run along the promenade wasn't so great, at least not on the way out when I was running in to the wind.  We got the train home before the rain really got going and here in Wiltshire it was bad but not too dramatic.  I do like a bit of weather...

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Am just home from the dentist - one of my least favourite places. Filling that disappeared has been fixed - very quick visit and the freezing hasn't lasted very long. So glad for all the modern improvements. Day is much brighter now. :)

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