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Salman Rushdie Knighted


SlowRain
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but wonder if the quality of his writing really justifies a knighthood...or did the imposition of the fatwah magnify the value of his work?

 

I think his writing is beautiful. There have been many times I've been reading and have had to re-read sentences because they were that good. I'm a bit anti-titles but if we are doing them then I definitely think he deserves one. To my mind he's one of the writers of today that people will be reading and studying in 50 or 100 years' time.

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Salman Rushdie is one of my favourite authors - and I like the magical realism stuff better than stuff like Fury.

My favorites are The Moor's Last Sigh and Midnight's Children. I also loved The Satanic Verses and couldn't understand why everyone went on at the time about how unreadable it was. If you like Gabriel Garcia Marquez and other similar stuff, you would enjoy Midnight's Children I should say.

In fact, going on hoildays next week and the Satanic Verses is in the possible holiday book bag for a re-read.

 

How many books do you pack into your holiday bags - I take more books than clothes mostly and then infuriate my husband by never being ready to go anywhere as I've always got my nose in one. But what else are hols for???? ;)

 

ZebraMc

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I have Sir Salman to thank for the development of my taste in books beyond pot-boiler mysteries, but wonder if the quality of his writing really justifies a knighthood...or did the imposition of the fatwah magnify the value of his work?
Is knighthood only for people who are generally to be top in their job or isn't it more who has done a lot for their country. Salman Rushdie surely has brought a lot of positive views to Britain (well, certainly also negative ones but from different positions). And if you look a t the number of prizes people get for bad books ...

I haven't read any of his books (shame on me! :notworthy) so I wouldn't be able to say whether he's a great writer or just can draw a lot of attention.

How many books do you pack into your holiday bags - I take more books than clothes mostly and then infuriate my husband by never being ready to go anywhere as I've always got my nose in one. But what else are hols for???? ;)

ZebraMc

We have a thread about this

hereIt's probably the right time of the year to bring it up again. ;)

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I haven't read any of Salman Rushdie's work. I think I was put off due to all the political hype so I didn't even realise what type of writing he did until I read the BBC article. I am now intrigued, so I think I will add some of the books suggested here on my list to get out of the library.

 

Could somebody who has read The Satanic Verses please explain what all the controversy is about.

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Could somebody who has read The Satanic Verses please explain what all the controversy is about.

 

I don't know that I can fully explain the controversy as a non-Muslim. It is also a good while since I read it (guessing 10 or 12 years) I suppose the problem is that some of the references don't have the same connotations to someone who hasn't been brought up with the Qu'ran.

 

Two Indians living in Britain are in a plane crash - magically saved and reborn as angel and devil. The "angel" could easily be read as schizophrenic (sp?) and has dreams which, amongst other things, involve "the Messenger" (for which presumably a Muslim would read the Prophet) and a telling of his life which distorts the Qu'ran.

I read and enjoyed it at the time as a good story and I enjoy the magical realism thing, as I mentioned in a previous post. It is floating its way into my holiday reading bag (read it on holiday last time too) so I will let you know more if I get any better understanding. I am looking forward to refreshing my memory!!

 

ZebraMc

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I've never read any Rushdie, so I can't comment on his literary merits, but I can't help feeling he would not have been quite so high up the list to receive a knighthood if it had not been for the fatwa issued against him.

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  • 2 years later...

I know this thread is a little dated now and probably no one is looking at it any more, but...I have to say that I believe that Salman Rushdie thoroughly deserves his knighthood; the Moor's Last Sigh is the most engaging, vivid, enriching reading experience I have ever had.

 

It would be nice to think that now, years after that atrocious fatwa has been lifted, we are able to view Salman Rushdie once again simply as a writer - and a writer of genius at that.

 

LV

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