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Just RY

My first "Growed up" book

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One of the first 'grown-up' books was also by Alistair Maclean - I think it was When Eight Bells Toll. (I hated it.) Maybe it was a generational thing, or maybe it's something to do with growing up near Reading! :confused:

 

However, the first grown-up book I read was actually The Island Of Dr Moreau by H.G. Wells. I was about 11.

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I'm really not sure on this.... there are a few I remember reading when I was just starting secondary school though:

 

Jane Eyre - Charlotte Bronte (the first "classic")

 

Colour of Magic - Terry Pratchett (my first fantasy)

 

1984 - George Orwell (it was the year I was born... and I thought it would be fun!)

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I can't remember exactly what it was, but I remember reading the Chronicles of Narnia quite early on, as well as a few Roald Dahl books. I loved Roald Dahl, but I only read the first two Narnia books and stopped because I found them so boring.

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I can't remember exactly what it was, but I remember reading the Chronicles of Narnia quite early on, as well as a few Roald Dahl books. I loved Roald Dahl, but I only read the first two Narnia books and stopped because I found them so boring.

:confused::confused::confused:

 

Please forgive the wish to place them in little boxes, but aren't they children's books?

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The first grown up book I read was Jane Eyre at the age of 11 - school syllabus and what a mistake. What a weird book to give to a child. My own choice was Gone with the Wind - was that better - I doubt it but at least it had all the ingredients of the books I now like.

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The Narnia books are aimed at children, they have pictures and they are quite small.

 

I remember trying to read Arthur Ransome's Pigeon Post when I was about 8 - not an adult book, either, but at 8, it felt like it was.

 

However, after much thought, I reckon mine was Agatha Christie's Seven Dials Murder, when I was about 11.

 

I also remember someone at school lending me a copy of Mayfair, but it had pictures, so it doesn't count! ;)

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:confused::confused::confused:

 

Please forgive the wish to place them in little boxes, but aren't they children's books?

 

Oh......I though you meant the first novel book thing as opposed to those little books you read when you're learning to read....

 

Ok, well the first adult book I read was Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy.

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As a kid, I loved Enid Blyton's books, especially the Secret Seven. The first adult book I remember reading was probably Animal Farm, when at school. I still love this book today. At around the same time, we read Of mice and Men, and I cried at the end! I saw the stage version in the theatre last year and thoroughly enjoyed it. Do people think that the books you read at school are always among your favourites?

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The Illustrated Man by Ray Bradbury when I was ten. I remember reading a lot of my Dad's SF when I was around that age, and read Asimov, Poul Anderson, James Blish etc.

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At around the same time, we read Of mice and Men, and I cried at the end! I saw the stage version in the theatre last year and thoroughly enjoyed it. Do people think that the books you read at school are always among your favourites?

 

I'm sorry to say this, but I hated most of the books I read at school. Probably because I don't like being told what to read, and I really dislike having to analyse "the significance of" something or other. For GCSE I had to compare Wuthering Heights and To Kill A Mockingbird, in my opinion those books were just not made for being compared by 16 year olds! Saying that though, TKAMB was one of the best books I read at school, I really enjoyed it the first time I read it, but after "analysing" it I just can't bring myself to read it again. Even worse than that was the anthology of short stories and poems we had to read and be able to talk about in the exams. Anyone who has studied English Literature GCSE under the dreaded "Curriculum 2000" will know what I mean.

 

Anyway, rant over. What I was going to write when I clicked "reply", was actually to the reference of crying at the end of a book. I do this from time to time, usually if a character I liked is killed off unexpectedly, or if the book has an (unexpected) sad end. Needless to say I got through a lot of tissues at the end of Lord of the Rings. :o

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Rother, my second grown up book was Ice Station Zebra!

 

As for My Friend Jack, and Mayfair - it's OK, it counts as a grown up publication if you don't look at the pictures, but read the articles and "letters to the editor" so I am sure we can accept that. ;)

 

As a youngster, I loved The Secret Seven books - more so than the Famous Five series.

 

Fiona, I had to study To Kill a Mockingbird for O-levels, I detested it. However, immediately before my exams, I read the book one more time - no teacher, no studying, really just a final read in an effort to get a pass (I ended up with a "C" - perhaps due to that final reading). That time around, with less pressure and no teaching, and reading a book for the story alone, I thoroughly enjoyed it. "Significance of", is a phrase used all too often when studying for English literature. ("Significant irony" was the other expression used too frequently - to this day, I have no idea what it means, and doubt that authors while penning their latest creation think to themselves, "You know what, it's been three chapters since my last 'significant irony', I should drop one in right here.")

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I guess I was lucky at school - I really enjoyed our GCE O-level books - JD Salinger's "Catcher In The Rye," the JB Priestley play, "Time and the Conways," the prologue to Chaucer's "Canterbury Tales" and Shakespeare's "Richard III."

 

Like Fiona, though, I don't like being told what to read - much to my late Dad's disappointment. He virtually never did any shopping, it was all left to my Mum, but for some unaccountable reason, he did once venture into a shop and bought me Jules Verne's "Journey to the Centre of the Earth." For what seemed like years thereafter, whenever he saw me reading, he would ask why I wasn't reading JTTCOTE. I'm afraid I still haven't read it, and the copy my Dad bought has long since gone.

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Yet another one forced to read 'Mockingbird' for O Level. Completely ruined though by the numptiness of our English teacher who made us go round the class reading a paragraph each. This of course reduced the whole exercise to counting out where your next 'gig' would come, and playing / daydreaming / flicking stuff at boys in between. :rolleyes:

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the first 'adult' book I read was a Stephen King book - Carrie. It was the summer holidays between primary and secondary school. I have just realised why I always have nightmares, reading a book like Carrie so young!...........

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I don't remember my first grown-up book (as defined in the original question), as I was an avid reader from a young age...you know, sauce bottles, cereal packets; if it had text, I would read it!

BUT, I do remember the first book I borrowed from the 'adult' section of the public library. It was one of the 'Whiteoaks' series by Mazo de la Roche, and had some romping in the hay in it. I was sure the librarian was going to stop me borrowing it!

 

I never could figure out how 'Mazo' was pronounced, as I had been learning french for a couple of years and couldn't decide between the english version of z, or the french.

 

It was all so many years ago!

 

Have just looked Mazo de la Roche up on 'google'.

Name pronounced mA zO, is Canadian, and female (I'd always assumed male, but don't know why).

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I can't remember specifically which would be the first 'growed up' book but in my teenage years I was reading Lord of the Rings/ Turgenev & Dostoyevsky, James Herbert and Stephen King. The Rats by Herbert was a big favourite with my peers at the time. My parents read a lot of Agatha Christie so I will have been readin her as well. At school I remember we did Animal Farm but can't recall anything else.

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I worked my way through the few books my parents owned long before starting on the adult section of the library.

I have no idea which of these I read first, but I had been reading our two bound volumes of The Strand Magazine before I hit secondary school (and ignited an enthusiasm for Sherlock Holmes) - but those had pictures, lots of them. As did The Complete Home Doctor (very educational, that one!)

 

I also worked my way through The Complete Plays Of George Bernard Shaw, and a few adventures of Raffles by E.W. Hornung, The Toff by John Creasey and The Saint by Leslie Charteris.

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The Fog - James Herbert was THE very first adult book an old battered copy which was falling apart which I found in a bus station and I also read my dads set of Agatha Christie books.

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I must have been a pushy kid on the literary front. Inspired by the 1970s kids' TV series version, I tried to read Daniel Defoe's "Robinson Crusoe" when I was about 8.

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Angelique and the Sultan by Sergeanne Golan, a very popular series in the sixties. Angelique gets captured by pirates and is displayed naked in front of the Sultan, at 9 I had never read anything so shocking - or exciting.

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The Fog - James Herbert was THE very first adult book an old battered copy which was falling apart which I found in a bus station and I also read my dads set of Agatha Christie books.

 

Is that the one where the 'fog' sends people mad and the vicar starts peeing on his congregation? As teenagers this irreverence was welcomed with open minds and a lot of laughter.

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I remember the first grown up book I got from the library, it was "Peony" from Pearl S. Buck. I had no idea than that this was the word for my favourite flower. I might have read other adult books in school before.

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