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The Lost Tribes Of Pop: Goths, Folkies, iPod Twits And Other Musical Stereotypes

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Hubby was reading this book on a flight to London yesterday and he says that he laughed so hard at one part that an attendant asked him to be quiet. Now, hubby is the biggest wallflower I know and had levels of etiquette that even the Queen would balk at so I take this anecdote as a huge recommendation to read this book.

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Hubby was reading this book on a flight to London yesterday and he says that he laughed so hard at one part that an attendant asked him to be quiet. Now, hubby is the biggest wallflower I know and had levels of etiquette that even the Queen would balk at so I take this anecdote as a huge recommendation to read this book.

 

Thanks for letting me know, Hazel. That's brightened up my day!

 

I've just done a Q and A about the book with Jessica Ruston at the very fine <a href="http://visit.thebookbar.com/blog">Book Bar</a> site...

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Hubby was reading this book on a flight to London yesterday and he says that he laughed so hard at one part that an attendant asked him to be quiet. Now, hubby is the biggest wallflower I know and had levels of etiquette that even the Queen would balk at so I take this anecdote as a huge recommendation to read this book.

I can identify with that.

 

I only came across the book when we had the crash. I was trying to find out what had happened and found a plug for the book on the BGO MySpace.

 

Well done and thank you Top Cat. I love it - Bitesize chunks of humour that just fit with coffee and satisfy and endorse my need to observe and analyse others. . . . . and myself of course. I did the laughing out loud bit too, but sometimes had to be careful when my daughter's friends were round - image building can be a serious thing in the young.

 

Every chapter brought friends and acquaintances to mind and am still picking it up to re-dip.

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I read this book recently and really enjoyed it! Was reminded of the 'one man woman' last night when on the tube heading away from Shepherds Bush, obviously not long after The Manic Street Preachers gig had let out of the empire. There were middle aged women a plenty giggleing and reminiscing about various other manics gigs they had devotedly attended and generally talking about the band like they were good mates! Clearly not a Cliff/ Daniel O'Donnell exclusive phenomenon! Made me smile.

 

(I also realise this mildly judgmental remark puts me into a whole musical snob type category of my own. ah well.)

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Thanks for your comments! Glad you enjoyed it, Laura and Angel.

 

Nicky Wire as the new Cliff/Daniel O'D? It's not as far fetched as some people might think. I can see the future for those Manic Street Preachers fans right now: the hot water bottle, the foot spa, the signed photo of Richey above the bed to be kissed last thing at night....

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Whilst I have to say I didn't find this book laugh out loud funny, as an ardent music fan there were definitely moments where I winced with recognition as I saw elements of my own lifestyle being parodied.

 

I wouldn't align myself with any one of the profiles contained within, but then one probably ought to worry about oneself a little bit if one is exactly like any of these pen portraits. The profiles of those with wilder pasts such as Rave Mom certainly struck a chord, and I've met plenty of Audiophiles, iPod Twits and Old School Goths on my journey through life. I guess the closest is The Indie Kid, only about 20 years older.

 

An entertaining read, suitable for if you need a book ideal for when you only have an odd few minutes here and there to read.

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