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I read Killing Floor six years ago now and then I read all Lee Child's books. I enjoy both Lee Child’s writing and his imaginative stories. I think he’s a remarkable man and I’ve found some really interesting interviews on this new web-site: http://www.jackreacher.co.uk. So how Jack Reacher are you? I’m pretty close to the real thing – just did a test on this new web-site. Quite cool! :)

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I'm 80% Jack, not bad, eh? I haven't read the most recent three novels but I think I haved a feel for the man.

 

Jbradley, you'll find that Reacher/Child have many fans here, many of us introduced to him by Hazel on this site. She has an unhealthy (?) fixation with the man. :D

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Here is last year's discussion regarding the wandering detective: Part 1

 

Claire 21st January 2006, 07:53 PM

Anyone out there want to join me in confessing that they love these books!? (Hazel, I know you're out there )

 

I love the way they gallop along, and drag me breathlessly along with them - and I have a soft spot for Jack Reacher. In some ways I envy his complete lack of ties and the way he just goes as he wishes.

 

I've only read about 4 or 5 of them, though, and I wonder if his character will continue to develop, as it has done so far, or whether Lee Childs will fall into a rut and just keep re-doing the same thing. Anyone read more than me and like to comment?

 

Anyone want to provoke a bit of heat and excitement and denounce them as worthless trash

Mungus 22nd January 2006, 12:40 PM

I've seen these mentioned by various people on BGO and I'm very tempted. I'm always up for a well written trashy page turner (you know what I mean!). Should I start at the beginning and work through the titles or can I just see what the library has in stock?

Claire 22nd January 2006, 12:56 PM

Ooh, don't know, (she said, helpfully )

 

The stories are self-contained, rather than deliberate sequels, or an on-going saga, so any of them would make sense without the others. There is a bit of a background story that develops over time, as you learn a bit more about the central character and what makes him the way he is. But it's only a relatively minor part of each book. I guess it depends on how much you like that side of things. They'll certainly still make complete sense and be a good read, if you just dive in.

 

Does that help? Anyone got a second opinion?

Hazel 22nd January 2006, 10:38 PM

Okay, Okay thank you Claire for this thread as I am the number one fan of Jack Reacher novels! I love them and buy them immediately when they come out in hardback - in fact I own all the books and they are all first editions. I know they aren't high end literature, but they are well written thrillers and keep you completely on the edge of your seat. You can easily devour one in a few hours and be completely satisfied - they are just fantastic. Jack Reacher is a fantastic anti-hero - he's not altogether good, and just seems so remarkable. I love the way he roams the land with no home, money, ties, reponsibilities and manages to just do his thing whatever. It is escapist fiction in the purest form. My only complaint is that you have to wait a while in between novels to get your next fix.

 

With regards to where to start, it is probably best to start with Killing Floor the first one and go from there. Even though each is a self contained story, there is a fundamental plot line, well rather time line, that runs through them and some features of one book carries onto the next and some stories are resolved in subseqent books. The last one actually went back in time, to Jack's time in the Army. We meet him in Killing Floor having left the army - well Military Police.

 

The books are really formulaic - Jack pulls up in a new place, meets someone in distress, hangs round to help out, beds a woman, is doubted by the males around hims, climaxes in dramatic rescue scene allowing Jack to show off his skills and prove everyone wrong, and ultimately stupid. This sounds rather off putting but you know exactly what you are going to get with a Jack Reacher novel and they are so well written and exciting that it really doesn't matter.

 

Long Live Jack Reacher - and Lee Child for that matter!

Claire 23rd January 2006, 07:41 AM

Originally Posted by Hazel

The last one actually went back in time, to Jack's time in the Army. We meet him in Killing Floor having left the army - well Military Police.

 

What's this one called? I've always been very intrigued about his time in the army. Whenever he's asked, he's always very cagey and tight lipped about why he left.

 

Hazel 23rd January 2006, 10:45 AM

That one is The Enemy, it was the second last book, sorry. The last one was called One Shot. The new one The Hard Way is out on the 13th of July and yes, I already have it on pre-order at Amazon. Lee Child's website is very good at keeping the fans up to date - http://www.leechild.com

 

Royal Rother23rd January 2006, 11:37 AM

Sounds right up my street. I will go and buy a 3 in one bumper paperback shortly. (Sure I've seen one in Methuens recently.)

 

Sounds to me like you would love Michael Connelly's Harry Bosch novels. My favourite thriller writer of the moment. Top cop novels, proper police work, flawed character (aren't they all?), unlucky in love (aren't they all?), excellent stories very well written.

Hazel 23rd January 2006, 12:25 PM

I did like Harry Bosch books a lot too, especially The Poet and The Concrete Blonde, but after Lost Light which I though was really poor, I went right off them and realised I was still only buying Connelly books because of the earlier books. The newer ones weren't good enough to sustain my loyalty which is a pity as The Poet is an amazing crime thriller.

 

Jack Reacher/Lee Child hasn't let me down yet, though Echo Burning wasn't up to the usual standard, but still better than others of the same genre.

Claire 23rd January 2006, 01:22 PM

I haven't tried, (or even heard of) Harry Bosch, Royal Rother. I'll have to see what I can find, they sound well worth a shot. Thanks.

 

The only Jack Reacher book I haven't liked so far is "The Visitor" which I've just finished.

 

I didn't like the fact that it relied on hynotism for the plot to work It seemed more like a cheap gimmick than a proper plot, really. Plus I guessed that was probably the answer by about a third of the way in, and that always spoils a novel, because I want to be kept guessing right to the end.

 

 

Royal Rother 23rd January 2006, 01:48 PM

Hazel, I agree "Lost Light" was the weakest yet. It seemed to be written as a simpler plot more suited to a screenplay, much like some of Grisham's more recent offerings.

 

Connelly's back on form with "The Narrows" which also features another of his characters, Terry McCaleb and a couple of others who have appeared in previous books. Hopefully it'll whet your appetite all the more when I tell you the Poet is back.

 

Haven't read "The Closers" yet or his new one "The Lincoln Lawyer" which features a new character. I've only seen excellent reviews for that.

 

Definitely worth continuing with his output.

 

Hazel 23rd January 2006, 06:58 PM

Originally Posted by Claire

I haven't tried, (or even heard of) Harry Bosch, Royal Rother. I'll have to see what I can find, they sound well worth a shot. Thanks.

 

The only Jack Reacher book I haven't liked so far is "The Visitor" which I've just finished.

 

 

I didn't like the fact that it relied on hynotism for the plot to work It seemed more like a cheap gimmick than a proper plot, really. Plus I guessed that was probably the answer by about a third of the way in, and that always spoils a novel, because I want to be kept guessing right to the end.

 

 

Start with the earlier Bosch novels; The Last Coyote, The Concrete Blonde The Poet, The Black Echo, Bloodwork - they are all really fab books.

 

I agree with you about The Visitor, but for some reason I still enjoyed it - it was pretty fast paced.

 

Hazel 23rd January 2006, 07:01 PM

 

Originally Posted by Royal Rother

Connelly's back on form with "The Narrows" which also features another of his characters, Terry McCaleb and a couple of others who have appeared in previous books. Hopefully it'll whet your appetite all the more when I tell you the Poet is back.

 

I think I read The Narrows last year - about the water run offs in LA and some old guy in a house? THAT'S why I am keeping a log now...! I think it was quite good but still not enough to keep me with the series. It was the same with James Patterson - the books just got too dull and I got the feeling when I was reading that money was the incentive for continuing the output.

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Part 2

 

Claire 5th February 2006, 12:26 PM

Just finished The Enemy. It was very good in its own right as a novel, but also very satisfying to fill in some of the background and history of a familiar character. I expected it to end with Reacher leaving the army, but it didn't, so I'm wondering (and hoping!) that there's more novels to come from his army days.

 

This novel was in the first person, which was a little wierd, as I don't think any of the other ones have been. The Visitor was certainly in the third person at least. I wonder what's behind the change, it was disconcerting at first.

 

A very minor detail made me curious....Jack Reacher referred to a house he was visiting as looking rather "Victorian" in style. Do Americans really refer to architecture in terms of English Monarchs?? I guess they might, but it would seem a bit odd. Or is this a reflection of Lee Childs Britishness poking its nose in!?

Hazel 5th February 2006, 01:20 PM

 

Originally Posted by Claire

A very minor detail made me curious....Jack Reacher referred to a house he was visiting as looking rather "Victorian" in style. Do Americans really refer to architecture in terms of English Monarchs?? I guess they might, but it would seem a bit odd. Or is this a reflection of Lee Childs Britishness poking its nose in!?

From memory, I think Reacher's parents were English and he certainly did a stint while in the Army in England - so he would have some knowledge of the culture/history. But yes, I think alot of Child's Englishness comes through and thats why he made Reacher's bloodline the way it is to cover all bases. I thinkt he next one due out in July is previous to Killing Floor as well - not to sure. Are you going to keep up with them now Claire?

 

Claire 5th February 2006, 04:44 PM

 

Originally Posted by Hazel

From memory, I think Reacher's parents were English and he certainly did a stint while in the Army in England - so he would have some knowledge of the culture/history. But yes, I think alot of Child's Englishness comes through and thats why he made Reacher's bloodline the way it is to cover all bases. I thinkt he next one due out in July is previous to Killing Floor as well - not to sure. Are you going to keep up with them now Claire?

 

I do know that his mother was French, because that was in the one I've just read - her activities in WW2. I'm not sure about his father. I had the impression he was American, but that's based on nothing at all other than that he was in the US Army.

 

Much as I enjoy these, they're not the sort of books I would buy new. (Very few qualify for that), so I'll do my best to keep up with them, via libraries, charity shops and other assorted cheap sources of books!

 

Page 2 missing - some posts from it

 

Mungus 12th February 2006, 06:11 PM #15

I've just finished my first Jack Racher book, appropriately enough, the first in the series, 'Killing Floor'. To remind you seasoned fans, it's the one where he just happens to mosey into a town he's never been to before on the day after his brother gets killed there.

 

I have to say, I thoroughly enjoyed this book, to the point where at 1am I gave up the struggle to get to sleep and got up to read another half an hour! The writing style is terse and pacey, short sentences and sketchy descriptions, which helps been the tension and drama. I don't think I've ever read a book with such a high body count or with such gruesome details. That said, you do have to suspend belief and go with some of the coincidences and deductions that help to move the story along. But that's fine, he's not trying to win the Booker Prize. And I loved the fact that one of the clues was based on the position of an apostrophe!!!

 

So I will be reading some more, but like Cathy, I am seeking out the second hand and the library copies at the moment. We'll see if I get drawn further in as the series develops. Thanks for the tip guys.

 

Hazel 13th February 2006, 07:19 PM #21

Originally Posted by Mungus

In my mind, Russell Crowe would be to bulky. Need someone tall, lean and sinewy with a touch of menace and a twinkle. Films and actors aren't my thing, but if you find anyone who fits the bill, give them my number!

 

I agree, Clint Eastwood would have been very good in his younger days, but now regretfully he is a little too old. I think they will ahve to search for a new talent, because that person would become 'Jack Reacher', anyone else will just be 'Colin Farrell as Jack Reacher'.

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[color=red]Page 3[/color]

[B]Royal Rother 26th June 2006 11:19 PM[/B]
I've only read the one Jack Reacher novel but I agree totally with both of your comments.

That picture is plain daft as it doesn't fit the detailed descriptions given of him. It's just classic Superman from DC comics.

[B]Mungus 27th June 2006 08:14 PM[/B]
I've been trying to think of what cartoon character it reminds me of and I have an image of three tough guys leaning against a wall flipping coins, but can't place them in any cartoon. I'll probably wake up in the middle of the night with the answer.
[B]
cummycummins 27th June 2006 11:48 PM[/B]
First and third person

I agree to an extent but I think the facial features are spot on. Just look at how cool the guy looks.

I'm also just wondering about the first and third person thing in these books. I read Die trying first which was in the third person. I then read Killing Floor which was better but in the first person. I am now on "Tripwire". It is back to the third person. This was annoying at the start but then I just forgot all about the first person experiece. I checked "persuader" which I have not read yet and noticed it was in the first person again. I really prefer the first person although the third person is equally enjoyable. How many of his books are in the first person and how many in the third person. Also which do you Prefer. The first or the third peron because for me it's definately first. I think it makes Reacher seem more familiar and personal as a character and the story is always told from the same perspective. I think this makes it easier to understand. Like in "Tripwire" you are constantly told about Hobie and Chester and then Reacher again! It is kind of hard to follow. Any thoughts? :thinking:
[B]
Hazel 28th June 2006 08:32 AM[/B]
Lee Child said himself on his site that he changes narrator sometimes to suit the book, sometimes as a writing exercise and sometimes just for the hell of it. I don't think there is any profound reason for doing so. To be honest I don't really prefer one over the other, and in this genre I don't think it is significant. I just devour them all the same, and roll on July when the new one is out!!

[B]Hazel 28th June 2006 08:38 AM[/B]
[QUOTE]
Originally Posted by cummycummins
I agree to an extent but I think the facial features are spot on. Just look at how cool the guy looks[/QUOTE].

Nah, he looks too cocky - I see Reacher as more morose, and pretty much expressionless. God, that sounds as if I hate him!

[B]cummycummins 28th June 2006 01:30 PM[/B]
[QUOTE]
Originally Posted by Hazel
Nah, he looks too cocky - I see Reacher as more morose, and pretty much expressionless. God, that sounds as if I hate him![/QUOTE]

What do you think of the first person third person thing?

[B]Hazel 28th June 2006 03:55 PM[/B]

[QUOTE]Originally Posted by cummycummins
What do you think of the first person third person thing?[/QUOTE]

Well, as I said in my previous post - in this genre I don't think it is significant and certainly doesn't make me think very much - but then these kinds of books aren't really designed for displays of literariness. I don't prefer one over the other and just devour these books as total candy. Certainly, Lee Child doesn't assign any significance - so I guess it just comes down to personal preference.
[B]
Hazel 28th June 2006 03:58 PM[/B]
Here's what Child actually says on his site now about the narration -

(from leechild.com)

"Why are some Reacher novels in first person narrative and others in third person narrative?

Lee says writing in first person is more natural for him. But writing in third person gives him more freedom when building suspense. With third person narrative, the suspense builds easily as the reader can essentially see around corners and anticipate events about which Reacher has no knowledge. With the first person narrative, the reader can only know what Reacher knows. That's it in a nutshell. The storyline dictates what narrative voice would suit best. Certainly, with first person the story is more graphic and intimate as we're inside Jack's head. So far in the series, Killing Floor, Persuader, and The Enemy are in first person narrative. Die Trying, Tripwire, Running Blind/The Visitor, Echo Burning, Without Fail, One Shot, The Hard Way, and 2007's Bad Luck and Trouble are in third person."
[B]
Mungus 28th June 2006 08:49 PM[/B]
I was embarrassed that I hadn't noticed that, but from Hazel's post I see that I've only read one that was in the first person (Killing Floor) and as that was the first that I read, I'm using that as an excuse. As for preference, I think I'd like the third person better, as I like to think that we're sitting back watching what a cool customer Reacher is. It wouldn't influence my decision whether to read a book or not though.

[B]Flingo 28th June 2006 09:00 PM[/B]
I'm now thinking it would be interesting to read a third person one, as I have only read The Killing Floor. I struggled to get into Reacher's mind at first. It hadn't occurred to me that that might be because of the 1st person, I shall compare at some point!

[B]cummycummins 29th June 2006 03:18 PM[/B]
Try "Die Trying". It's not the best of his books but it is next in the series.

[B]Mungus 29th June 2006 06:51 PM[/B]
Crikey, that's a big wotsit you've got there cummycummins!

[B]cummycummins 29th June 2006 09:52 PM[/B]
[QUOTE]
Originally Posted by Mungus
Crikey, that's a big wotsit you've got there cummycummins![/QUOTE]

Yes it didn't quite come out as I planned. It does not work on this style of Forum I guess. It works with vBulletin.

Anyway. I was in my local Waterstones today(in Drogheda In Ireland) and they have the hardest way out for sale. Is this not supposed to be put on sale at a later date.
[B]
megustaleer 29th June 2006 10:02 PM[/B]
Is this: [url]http://www.tickers@TickerFactory.co.../388d/event.png[/url] what you were trying to do?

[B]Hazel 30th June 2006 08:20 AM[/B]
[QUOTE]
Originally Posted by cummycummins

Anyway. I was in my local Waterstones today(in Drogheda In Ireland) and they have the hardest way out for sale. Is this not supposed to be put on sale at a later date.[/QUOTE]

It comes out in the UK on the 6 July, but came out in the USA earlier, and if you are in Southern Ireland (my geography is awful - I had to ask my hubby last night if Hong Kong was in Japan - he laughed for an hour), it may have come out at the same time as the US edition. Lucky you though!

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Page 4

cummycummins 30th June 2006, 01:15 PM

Yes I'm in Southern Ireland! lol. hong kong in Japan !!!!!!

 

Anyway. Still I ain't going to read it yet because I'm only on tripwire. lol!

 

Mungus 30th June 2006, 02:13 PM

Originally Posted by Hazel

It comes out in the UK on the 6 July

 

I think I saw a copy in Tesco yesterday for £8.something...

 

Hazel 30th June 2006, 03:07 PM

Originally Posted by Mungus

I think I saw a copy in Tesco yesterday for £8.something...

 

 

Noooooooooo! Really? I am going to Tesco tonight...fingers crossed!

Hazel 30th June 2006, 08:29 PM

GOT IT!!!!!!! I will now stop reading the A M Homes, and delve straight into Jack (ooer) tonight. I am one happy, happy bunny tonight.

 

megustaleer 30th June 2006, 10:24 PM

You didn't think to buy an atlas while you were out, did you?

 

Hazel 1st July 2006, 09:26 AM

Originally Posted by megustaleer

You didn't think to buy an atlas while you were out, did you?

 

Funnily enough Meg, I have a globe in my living room that sits on a wee table next to my spot on the sofas, and I use it to look up places whenever they pop up on the TV. My husband bought is especially to make me improve my geography and therefore stop being embarrassing. It helps a little - but I have a real mental block when it comes to geography - it is really awful. Just last night I embarrassed myself discussing the countries around the Mediterrean - i wont go into details. Hubby always says I would do well on Who Wants To Be A Millionaire, but if there were any geography questions - I would be subject to public ridicule. It's an affliction.

 

cummycummins 2nd July 2006, 11:33 PM

On a side note books in Ireland always have the same release date as in the UK so there is no real reason we have it here and not in the UK. I don't think this is true.

 

Claire 10th July 2006, 07:39 PM

Going back to the first person/third person thing, if it hasn't already been discussed to death....I've just finished reading my first Patricia Cornwell novel, "The Last Precinct", which was told in the first person. This morning I picked up "Blow Fly" in the library, which picks up exactly where The Last Precinct leaves off, and it's in the third person. Maybe it's quite common for crime writers to swap, even within a series, according to what effect they are after. It was a bit disconcerting at first, but if I hadn't only just finished the previous one, I suspect I wouldn't have noticed at all.

cummycummins 13th July 2006, 10:29 PM

You are not the first person to say that you would not notice it. maybe it's just me but I like books I am really really enjoying to be the exact same. Improvments are good but I often fear they ruin my enjoyment. For this reason a change in narration hits me like the stench in the toilet after my dad uses it. Anyway I got used to it and it does not annoy me anymore!

Mungus 21st August 2006, 10:01 PM

Just finished reading 'Without Fail' and I think it's the best yet. Jack is approached by an ex-girlfriend of his (dead) brother and asked to audit the security arrangements in place to protect the Vice President of the USA. Needless to say, Jack finds a weakness or two and gets involved. I thought this book differed slightly from its predecessors by being slightly more complex and intelligent, which is a good thing in my book.

cummycummins 26th August 2006, 02:53 PM

I've about 80 pages of "The Visitor" as it is known here left and I think it is brilliant. I think in every lee child book their are very intelligent plots and Reacher is very logical. I think that is the key to why these books are so enjoyable.

 

r3nu4l 28th August 2006, 09:01 PM

I didn't have any problem with the switch in narration and thought that Lee Child was brave to do it as some readers can't stand first-person narratives. He must have some clout with his editors as generally speaking these people follow the 'if it ain't broke...' rule. For me it was a welcome and refreshing change

 

I'm reading One Shot right now and while I've found the book to be excellent (as all Reacher novels, so far) I did find that Reacher was able to identify a medical (acronym) term that a he is highly unlikely to have come across during his time in the Army*. I feel that while Reacher is an intelligent guy and excellent investigator this was attributing slightly too much knowledge to his character. It knocked me slightly off balance but I've no other bad complaints so far.

 

*I don't want to give too much away for anyone who hasn't read the book.

Hazel 29th August 2006, 10:32 AM

Originally Posted by r3nu4l

II did find that Reacher was able to identify a medical (acronym) term that a he is highly unlikely to have come across during his time in the Army*. I feel that while Reacher is an intelligent guy and excellent investigator this was attributing slightly too much knowledge to his character. It knocked me slightly off balance but I've no other bad complaints so far.

 

*I don't want to give too much away for anyone who hasn't read the book.

 

Can you 'spoiler' it?

 

Just type

then what you want to say, then (and I have to spell this out or the message will go into a spoiler) [backslashSPOILER].

 

 

r3nu4l 29th August 2006, 11:00 AM

 

Ha, thanks Hazel, I do know how to spoiler but I know that for some people (me for example) spoiler tags are just too inviting and they view them anyway

 

But if you insist...be warned if you have not read One Shot don't view the spoiler it really does give a central part of the plot away!!

 

 

'because he has Parkinson's Disease, Reacher said to her.'PA means Paralysis Agitans, and Paralysis Agitans is what doctors call Parkinson's Disease'

 

 

Now unless Reacher has direct experience of this he is not going to know what this term means. My father-in-law suffers from this and I am a Medical Writer with a PhD in Medical Biology and I had not come across this term before so it is highly unlikely that Reacher would know this. There is no explanation of how Reacher has this knowledge either and so I got a little put off.

 

Maybe there was an explanation but it was removed during Editing! It's just something I noticed and it stuck with me. Almost finished the book and I have really enjoyed it so far

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  • 2 months later...

Just read Die Trying and really enjoyed it - more so than Killing Floor.

 

There was one thing that slightly troubled me which was that in the situation he found himself in, in the real world Reacher would have taken out Borken at the first available opportunity as he was the absolute leader on whom the whole group was completely dependent. He had opportunities to do so when armed with long distance rifles but the thought never went through his head (because the story needed stretching out a bit more of course).

 

I am more than happy to suspend belief when reading novels but this just seemed like a bit of weak plotting to me.

 

Still, that's a very minor gripe because it was definitely a gripping thriller.

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  • 2 weeks later...

I've just noticed one of my old posts above :) Having read that post I've just realised that I haven't read a reacher novel since then! Part of my reason for this is that I feel that Reacher has become too formulaic and is almost a cliche of himself and super-hero-like in nature.

 

Don't get me wrong, I loved the intensity of the books and the pace of the action, I just got a little tired I think. I will pick up some of the newer stuff just to see if anything has changed.

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Part of my reason for this is that I feel that Reacher has become too formulaic and is almost a cliche of himself and super-hero-like in nature.

I recently read The Enemy and didn't enjoy it as much as previous books because it was all starting to feel over-familiar. In fact the only thing that surprised me was that Reacher didn't get to bed the lawyer lady (or did he... :rolleyes: ). I think that this is a problem common to many series of novels and I'm going to take a long break before reading the next one, then I hope to come back to it fresh and able to enjoy it for what it is, a fine read.

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I have to agree with you Jen. I'm not in any way annoyed with the writing style, the plotting or pace of the books at all. Individually, each book is great and anyone picking up their first Jack Reacher novel will be blown away.

 

It took me a long time to come to the conclusion that I have reached (pardon the pun :)) about the Reacher books and that may ahve been because I read three in a row at one point but it seems that Reacher, gets in a fist-fight, rescues a damsel (physically or emotionally), beds said damsel, gets into another fight, gets his hand on some weapons, kills people without ever going to trial... in every book.

 

They are fantastic, well written, brilliantly put together and paced and just great books overall but a little part of my brain isn't ready to go back to Reacher just yet.

 

I know there used to be a thread on cliched detectives (gin-soaked, divorced, emotionally crippled, anger-ridden...) here but I feel that crime authrs can get away with this because these are mostly repetitive character flaws (and we all have those).

 

Reachers repetitive actions are all big events in the books (fights, killing, being a male slut :D) and therefore our eyes are more drawn to them or they register with greater impact so they are more noticeable. It sounds like I'm tearing the character to shreds but I'm not. As I say, on a standalone basis, the plot and the character holds well.

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  • 1 month later...

Just finished Tripwire. My 3rd Reacher novel and the most enjoyable so far for me. The love interest was slightly more interesting than the others because it was a lady he had known (and fancied like mad) when she was underage, and the plot seemed a little less obvious.

 

As with Die Trying there was one aspect of the plot that slightly troubled me however (setting aside the normal levels of beliefs of course) which was that nobody ever, during the whole course of the novel, thought to look up the name Hobie and trace their whereabouts / activities. If they had done that they would surely have traced him in a nanosecond...

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  • 5 weeks later...
  • 7 months later...

While this Andy Martin sounds like a stand-up guy, and possibly the most intelligent person I have ever encountered...he is no competition for me. I could take him on...

 

Thanks for that Jen - made my day!

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  • 3 weeks later...

Ha ha, despite my protestations I'm back reading Reacher :) I've just finished "Bad luck and trouble" and really, really enjoyed it.

 

Yes, it's still incredibly formulaic but Lee Child obviously knows he's onto a winner because he hasn't changed Reacher significantly. It was nice to see Reacher back with some of his buddies but I actually felt saddened by the loss of others. We never really met these characters but Child's description of their appearance in photographs and tell-tale characteristics displayed by the characters in these photos, along with Reachers reactions to them, made these characters feel real. Good Job, Lee Child!!

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  • 1 month later...

Just read The Visitor and enjoyed it up to a point.

 

Having just come from reading 3 James Lee Burke Dave Robicheaux novels, which are beautifully written, but not entirely suited to late night reading due to the level of detail in the text, I found Lee Child's writing comfortable page-turning escapist fiction but very very undemanding and having finished it a bit like waking up after a Chinese meal.

 

At times I felt like the plot twists and revelations were rather reminiscent of James Patterson, which is not meant to be a compliment.

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Well I approach the books with a 'take it as it is meant' attitude. I'm sure Lee Child is not expecting to be awarded a Nobel Prize for Literature in the coming year so he's happy selling page-turners.

 

I've commented previously on some crucial pieces of plot revelation that I really disliked in one of the books and it did put me off but on the whole I really like the series.

 

It's a bit like watching an Indiana Jones movie, if you go in expecting a fascinating tale of historical archaeology you'll be disappointed but if you are looking for some action and adventure with slight fantasy thrown in then you'll enjoy yourself.

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After reading The Visitor, fancying another quick light read, I went straight onto Echo Burning which I enjoyed more than the former and was one of the best Reacher novels IMHO.

 

Unpredictable in that he didn't bed the girl, even though she offered / asked on more than one occasion...!

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Lee Child is profiled in today's Observer.

 

Tom Cruise's production company has bought the movie rights, although Child says he would want a Lawrence Dallaglio lookalike in the lead role
I don't know what's more laughable about this, the idea that Cruise might be considering playing the 6'5" Reacher or that Lawrence Dallaglio fulfills Hazel's fantasies!;)
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I don't know what's more laughable about this, the idea that Cruise might be considering playing the 6'5" Reacher or that Lawrence Dallaglio fulfills Hazel's fantasies!;)

I didn't see the profile in the paper today, although I have only read the Review so far. Thanks though Jen.

 

Cruise as Reacher? - absolutely no bleeding way!! I'll start a petition against that.

 

Dallaglio? Is he a rugby player? I think I know what he looks like and...nah!

 

I don't know who I'd like to see in the role actually. Have to have a think about that.

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